Interview: Micah

Today we’re joined by Micah. Micah is an awesome poet who specializes in dark and depressing poetry. They take inspiration from a variety of sources, including nature and relationships. They’re clearly a very dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a poet. Most of it is kind of depressing but it brings a spark of truth, or a place you can relate to a world where you are judged for everything.

What inspires you?

I am inspired by nature and relationships. I write about toxicity in relationships and missing the past. I write about life changing events.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My grandparents got me into poetry. My grandma is a jeweler and writer and my grandpa is a sketch artist and a welder. My family is full of creative people so i grew up reading and writing.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I use lots of metaphors that are special to me.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep it up! You might not get it right away, but all artists need time to find their style.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am demisexual and demiromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have not yet met anyone who did not agree with my sexuality…it was more gender related.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“So you’re like…a plant?”

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There is nothing wrong with you. You aren’t broken, you aren’t messed up. Keep on exploring yourself. You know yourself better than anyone else.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Wattpad. I have a book called ‘why wait’ on my account wait-a-minute-what. Check it out!

Thank you, Micah, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Olivia

Today we’re joined by Olivia, who also writes as Staronet. Olivia is a wonderful fanartist who loves writing fanfiction. She loves writing stories about the anime she enjoys. Her current love is Yuri on Ice. Olivia has also written some poetry, but fanfiction is where her passion lies. She’s a dedicated writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a fan-fiction writer, for the anime that has taken my soul, ‘Yuri on Ice!!!” but I also write my own content as well. I guess I could count this by saying I am a published poet, and I hate writing poetry.

What inspires you?

I think it first started out as something just cause but now I am inspired to keep writing after getting comments asking for me. As well as aspiring to write like one of my favorite fan-fiction authors, Authormagrant.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I actually didn’t ever set out to write fan-fiction ever. I use to think it was weird, no offence but that was how younger me felt until my friend admitted she read it. Then my curiosity was peaked and I had to read some and whelp here I am now, I don’t regret it one bit as I have met so many people through it.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Sadly I am not that cool to have anything special.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just go for it, don’t hesitate and stop yourself from doing something you want to. You want to write a novel, do it. Create art or join a dance group. Do it. I jumped in on mine and have not only had a wonderful time doing it, it’s also helped me with my writing because I can get feedback. Don’t see yourself short, you’ve got the talent to do it.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am just ace straight.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I thankfully have not as I have not really come out to a lot of people but I have with one of my friends who accepts me for who I am. The only thing I think would count would be my friends making a couple jokes about it a few months back, I sat there in silence and basically prayed they’d stop.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I don’t understand or can’t make sexual jokes. I am the queen of sexual jokes here.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You don’t have to rush things, it’s okay to not be for sure right now. You have your whole life ahead of you to help you figure it out and if it never happens that is okay as well. Just know that you are loved and will supported in the LBTQA community. I love you all and my Tumblr is always open to anyone who needs to vent.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I am so bad at updating my Tumblr but at sassy-potato-of-wonder is where I tend to try and link my new chapters or fics. My AO3 account is ‘Staronet,’ as for the poem well sorry that poem will never see the light of day again.

Thank you, Olivia, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jessica

Today we’re joined by Jessica, who also goes by stormleviosa online. Jessica is a wonderful up and coming writer who recently had a short story published in an anthology. She’s currently a student studying English and writes in her free time. Jessica hopes to write longer narrative forms, such as novels and novellas, in the future. She’s clearly a dedicated artist with an incredibly bright future ahead of her as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer when I have time but mostly I’m a student because education is important. I’ve written a few short stories and I’m currently working on longer pieces (novellas or eventually a full-length novel). I also write a lot for my college newspaper which I am also an editor of.

What inspires you?

I don’t really have a specific inspiration for my work. Some of what I write is heavily based on current affairs, particularly those I have an invested interest in such as the refugee crisis. I also write from prompts or based on other author’s works which includes dabbling in fanfiction. For my most recent piece of coursework, I wrote a short story based on 1984 with heavily implied connections to the Brexit situation in the UK.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

It sounds cliché but I’ve been writing since I was a young child. I read a lot of books (and still do) which helped develop my skills and it escalated from there. I’m also useless at art so being able to express myself with words rather than images was important.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I like to write about things I am passionate about and problems that need to be resolved. Often, I try to include characters that are marginalized or misrepresented by the media to spread the issue to a wider range of people. It is something that challenges my writing but is very rewarding for me.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t stop writing! If you truly feel passionate about it, write about it and don’t let anyone convince you it’s worthless. If you hit a writer’s block, work around it by writing something else. But at the same time, it’s OK to take a break if you need to. Your writing will only suffer if you work yourself into the ground.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m an aromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t encountered any yet although this may be because I’m not out to many people. My sexuality does make it difficult to write romantic subplots between characters because I don’t experience those kinds of feelings.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Mainly that asexuality is something you will grow out of. My parents don’t know I’m asexual but whenever I mention that I don’t want a relationship they tell me I’ll change my mind. It’s not a phase to grow out of and that’s perfectly alright.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t worry about figuring it all out right this second. You have all the time in the world to sort out what you feel and if you never find a label that fits that fine too. Any feeling you have is valid so don’t worry about categorizing them all right away.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I don’t have much published work but my most recent is in the DoveTales anthology (published later this year) which is compiled by Writing for Peace. There is more information on their website or you can ask me questions directly via my blog (stormleviosa.tumblr.com). I sometimes write fan fiction on AO3 under an account with the same name (StormLeviosa).

Thank you, Jessica, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Mady O.

Today we’re joined by Mady O. Mady is a wonderful aspiring author who specializes in writing short stories, short novels, and plays. Occasionally she dabbles in poetry, but narrative forms are where her heart lies. When she’s not writing, Mady enjoys doing a number of other creative activities. It’s clear she’s a dedicated artist with a bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a currently unpublished writer. For the most part I like writing short novels / stories and sometimes fanfiction, but recently I’ve been writing plays (because my literature teacher really liked a play of mine and asked me to write more). Sometimes I write poetry, but I never put as much heart into my poems as I do my novels and plays.

I do dabble in other things like cosplay, doodling, and origami. Dancing is also fun, but I am in no way good at it.

What inspires you?

Oh man, a lot of different things, but usually songs and paintings. I love listening to music, and I think lyrics are an important part of the experience. At times I hear a line or two of a song and immediately start thinking of a scenario. The same goes for those beautiful painted fantasy posters. They’re always so intricate and busy, yet flowing and well balanced. It’s fun to think of what might of happened to create such a pretty scene. I also like to take my different scenarios and mix them together to make a story.

Most other things I get inspiration from are other arts like books, movies, shows, comics, podcasts, etc. But I also like to take a bit from real life. Like a couple of my characters are like a couple of my friends in some ways. Or, in one case, an event happened to a family member, which helped inspire me to write a story for them.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I don’t know what got me interested, but for as long as I can remember I loved to write.  I’ve been told (but I’m not sure how true it is) that I’ve been writing since I was two. Although those first stories were scribbles on a paper that I would show to my mom. I would then tell her the story by translating the scribbles. Since then I have been slowly improving, and I still have a lot to learn.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Ha ha yes I do. To honor my literature teacher, who has helped me rapidly improve my writing more than any other teacher, I have been putting an Easter egg in all my more professional works. It’s also a little in-joke with my friends.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Read good books and write! Write anything! Anywhere! Grab a notebook and describe your lawn. Or maybe write a poem about the silence of your home. Or the craziness of your grocery store. That one idea that’s been floating around in your head? Go write it! Then go read a good book and write it again. If the book is written well, then you will be learning from the author without fully knowing it. Some of my best teachers have been authors that lived long before I was born.

And never EVER stop writing.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a heteromatic asexual (with some currant suspicions that I could be demiromatic as well).

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Thankfully no (but I wouldn’t be surprised if I did in the future). That’s probably because I am still in the slow process of coming out to those I’m close to. Also because I am just beginning to be known more professionally in my field.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I haven’t personally encountered much misconception. But a couple times I get the “you may not like it at first, but you’ll get used to it” idea. Which is a pretty dumb idea. It’s like trying to force you to like a color that you don’t like. It’s unnecessary and rude.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If you’re unsure, then take the time to think about it. There’s no rush, my fellow human. We’re all learning new things about ourselves every day. If you think you’re broken or too weird, you’re not. As you might have seen from this blog alone you are not the only one who feels this way. And if you feel nervous about coming out to everyone, then you and I are on the same boat. You’re not alone either.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Sadly I don’t have any official blog or website for my writing as of yet. But I do have a AO3 account for fanfiction. I’m a new member to the site so there’s not much at the moment, and I am still in the process of moving my older fics from the Fanfiction net account to the AO3 account. https://archiveofourown.org/users/JekkieFan/pseuds/JekkieFan

I also have a personal blog here on Tumblr were I reblog mostly a bunch of fandom things. Feel free to look at it if you’d like:  https://jekkiefan.tumblr.com/.

Thank you, Mady, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Harmony

Today we’re joined by Harmony. Harmony is an awesome up and coming author who is currently working on the first novel in a series. She prefers to write science fiction and fantasy stories. When she’s not writing, Harmony enjoys singing and dancing. It’s clear she’s a passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m primarily a fiction writer, although I do sing and dance. Most of my stories are fantasy, sci-fi, or have supernatural elements to them. Currently, I’m working on the first book in a series based on fairy tales. It’s been hard for me to find the time to write, but I’ve been making progress little by little.

What inspires you?

I like to ask myself a lot of “what if” questions, and see where my imagination takes me. I also use little bits and pieces that I like from other stories. Some ideas can come at random times, which is why I usually have my phone on hand to jot down ideas. One of my stories was inspired by a title that I randomly came up with while thinking about a cartoon character!

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a reader, and since I was little, I’ve made up stories. When I was younger, my mom swore I would be a writer, and even though I insisted she was wrong, here I am now! I really started writing in elementary school, when we had to write short stories for class. I came up with a book about a girl who adopted a dog that turns out to be a cursed human girl. I won a small writing contest with that story, and that inspired me to keep writing.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t have any common mark in my stories, but every writer has their own individual voice that you can sometimes identify. I like to be very descriptive in characters’ appearances and the background.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing and developing your art, no matter what other people say. There’s no one else who knows your art like you do. It might seem hard, but if you take a few minutes every day, you can create something beautiful.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual, though I use it as the umbrella term, since I’m not sure where I fall on the spectrum.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

There’s not really any prejudice so much as ignorance about asexuality. I’ve read a lot of books, and it’s been mentioned once or twice, at most. Most fiction books for anyone over thirteen have some sort of “oh, that person’s so hot” moment. I’ve heard of some books with a canon ace character, but I’ve never read any. Personally, I try to keep my characters diverse, but there’s barely any romance, and no sex in my stories, so their sexualities aren’t very important to the story.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I’ve only talked to a few close people about asexuality, and they’re accepting, but the most common misconception is that I’m too young to know. I live in a city, so more people do know a little about it, at least.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You know yourself better than anyone, and only you truly know what you’re feeling. Other people’s ignorance doesn’t change that. There’s nothing wrong with you, you’re not broken, and you are not alone.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I don’t have anything published … yet. But I occasionally post parts of stories based on writing prompts on my Tumblr, at demonfairyprincess. You can also find me on Wattpad, sgeheart24. (I named my account a while ago, when I had just gotten into the School for Good and Evil series. I’m a fan, so sue me.) I only have part of an old fanfic there, but I plan to eventually post some original stories.

Thank you, Harmony, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Bri Castellini

Today we’re joined by Bri Castellini. Bri is a phenomenal filmmaker who specializes in short films and webseries. She’s the creator of Sam and Pat are Depressed, a series that follows depressed roommates Sam and Pat as they help each other navigate the inherent awkwardness of therapy through profanity, humor, and take out. Bri has gotten a lot of attention from the ace community for the short film Ace and Anxious. Bri is very dedicated to own voices and in both these works, there are explicitly ace characters. It’s clear she is a dedicated and passionate filmmaker, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Bri

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer and filmmaker, based currently out of Brooklyn, New York. My first web series, Brains, has two seasons plus two extended universe projects (a miniseries and a short film), and is about a college student post-zombie apocalypse who’s obsessed with getting her 5 year plan back on track, starting with a boyfriend. I wrote, produced, and edited the series, as well as played the lead character Alison. You can find Brains at brainswebseries.com. My second web series, Sam and Pat are Depressed, is actually in the process of “airing” right now on SeekaTV (Seeka.TV/samandpat– free to view but you have to make an account). It’s about two roommates who deconstruct their therapy together in funny ways to find humor in their mental health journeys. I wrote, produced, and edited this series as well, and play the character Sam, a biromantic asexual woman. I also have a short film that’s made quite a few rounds on Tumblr- Ace and Anxious, about an asexual woman named Emma with generalized anxiety disorder who, in attempt to curb her anxiety without paying for medication, places a “free sex” ad on Craigslist, because she learned of the stress-relieving “powers” of sex and wanted to test that out. I wrote, produced, edited, and directed that film. You can watch the full film on the LGBT+ streaming service REVRY or for free on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/215587592. I’ve also produced half a dozen other web series and shorts for friends and fellow filmmakers.

What inspires you?

Tons of stuff! I’m a big fan of apocalypse fiction, people arguing, and characters put in situations at odds with their comfort zones. Sometimes a friend will make a joke and that’ll become a web series (as in the case of Sam and Pat, which is based on conversations I’ve had with my good friend Chris Cherry. He’s at truestoriesaboutme on Tumblr). In terms of people who I consider career inspirations, I really look up to multi-hyphenates like Mindy Kaling, Amy Sherman-Palladino, and the indie filmmaker Kate Hackett, all very funny women who do a little bit of everything.

Also, if I could ever direct something as snappy and stylized as Edgar Wright, I’d consider myself a success.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer, but up until my last year of college, I wanted to write prose. Novels, short stories, that sort of thing. It wasn’t until I listened to the podcast The Nerdist Writer’s Panel, a podcast of TV writers talking about making their shows, that I realized I wanted to get into screenwriting. I applied to exactly one grad school in New York (I was in college in Oregon at the time), got in, and moved across the country as soon as I graduated from undergrad. About eight months later we made the pilot episode for Brains for a class, and I loved independent producing so much we decided to keep going and make the whole first season. The rest is history. Indie filmmaking has made me very, very broke, but happier than ever before.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if I’d say I have a signature, but I like to think I have a very distinct writing voice. I’m a fan of when characters speak in really long, unnecessarily complicated sentences at very quick paces, and I love writing arguments, because I think they’re the most fun version of human conversation. So if you’re watching a Bri Castellini project, there’s likely at least two arguments and there’s definitely a long, anxiety-ridden rant by one character who speaks very quickly like they’re afraid they’ll burst otherwise.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t wait for permission or wait for the perfect conditions- the conditions are never perfect and the only person you need permission from is yourself. Figure out what you enjoy doing, and then do that as often as possible, trying to improve a little each time. And even though doing everything yourself seems easiest and most impressive at first, asking for help is the mark of a true artist, especially in film.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a heteroromantic ace, probably whatever the step right below gray ace is. There are a lot of differing opinions on what the spectrum is and what the different labels are, but in general my opinion on sex is between “shrug” and “oh, yeah, that’s a thing people do outside of movies.” I’m in a long term monogamous relationship with an allosexual man.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

My field is indie media right now, which is, as you can imagine, a much more progressive arena than mainstream Hollywood, so I’ve never experienced ignorance directly. I also didn’t realize I was asexual until about three years ago when I did some research and all the insecurities I had and confusion I was experiencing finally clicked. I’ve been remarkably lucky about the circles my work has ended up in, though, and I am aware of what a privilege that is.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexual people don’t have sex. I’ve been with my partner for five years now, which is the first thing people know about me in regards to my romantic life, and when they find out I’m asexual afterwards there are a lot of very awkward, personal questions I get asked as they puzzle out how to categorize me in their minds.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Do your research! When I was figuring out my own sexuality, I read every article I could find and watched every video available on asexuality, and eventually, I had enough information to confirm what I probably always knew, somehow. Research also helps when coming out to people closest to you, especially if you’re in a relationship (as I was when I came out). I’m a very pragmatic, analytical person though, so the takeaway for someone who doesn’t want to write themselves a sexuality dissertation (I wish this was a joke, but, well, here we are), labels aren’t written in stone. Just communicate with yourself and with your partner (if you have one) about how you’re feeling at different moments, and let the label evolve until you feel it expresses what you need it to.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Following me on Twitter and Tumblr (BrisOwnWorld on both) is a great place to start, because I’m very active on those sites, but you can get a complete look at what I’ve created on my website, BriCastellini.com. I’m always available if you need advice on a filmmaking or writing problem!

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Thank you, Bri, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Rachel S.

Today we’re joined by Rachel S.. Rachel is a wonderful up and coming writer who is currently studying for a degree in English, journalism, and creative writing. She writes quite a bit of poetry but also writes long-form pieces. Rachel is a phenomenally talented and dedicated writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer currently living in Arizona and I am in the process of gaining degrees in English, journalism, and creative writing. After almost seven years of writing everything I could, I find that original, thoughtful pieces suit me more than anything else!

Right now I’ve been working on more ethereal themes in my writing along with more detailed scenes and dialogue.

What inspires you?

As cliché as it might sound, I find inspiration everywhere. Car rides and flowers will inspire poetry just as Tumblr posts and things my friends say can inspire full stories. Personally, I find that anything can be inspiring – it’s just a matter of how you look at it.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Oh, not at all! When I was younger I had wanted to be a singer, believe it or not. I got interested in writing in middle school because a friend of mine wanted to write our own Harry Potter fanfiction. It was absolutely horrible: our OCs were Mary Sues and I couldn’t take valid criticism. But if it wasn’t for that first and delightfully bad venture into writing, I don’t know where I’d be now.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if I’d call this a signature feature I do but I have been known for doubling up and my tone. I’m a very long, drawn out writer and when I give detail I love to give it two adjectives or just unneeded adjectives in general. (It drives my editor mad, let me tell you.)

As for my tone, I’m a very bittersweet writer. I don’t care for strictly happy things or continually horrible things. I’m very much “sad beginning, happy end” or “humorous beginning, sad end”.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Write whatever you want. Write what you know, write what you don’t – write with too many commas and spaces and ellipses and exclamation points. Write happy things and dark things and then write the one you like the most. Write fantasy and science fiction and mythology and about what happened last week in school. There is nothing you shouldn’t write. And don’t forget to read either! That is just as important as writing most days.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a sex-repulsed aromantic asexual … kind of. It’s really hard to explain exactly how I feel most of the time. I’ve learned to just say that I’m gay or bi if someone asks but I’ve been lucky enough to encounter people who genuinely take the time out of their day to listen to me talk about my orientation. I’ve learned to not limit myself to, in full, I consider myself a pan-aromantic asexual.

I have no romantic or sexual inclination but I’d be ecstatic to date any person should we be compatible. Orientations are fluid so why not put a prefix on your prefix?

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have never encountered prejudice but ignorance has definitely been a theme. I’ve been lucky enough to encounter well written asexual characters but misinformation is, sadly, a norm. Sometimes the character is hypersexualized and other times they’re a complete prude – which I understand to a degree. However, there was one non-ace writer who had called the asexuality their character portrayed as “their favorite type” of asexuality—which, you know, was a little creepy.

Other than these few instances, I don’t think people write about asexuality enough as is.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common is that the asexual will still be “like everyone else” and have sex. There are real asexuals like that but this also ignores all the sex-repulsed asexuals (like me and a good friend of mine). I wouldn’t call this a misconception but it is a fact that not all facets of asexuality is being represented.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There’s sex-repulsed asexuals, sex-positive asexuals, gray-asexuals, demisexuals – there are so many ways you can identify. Don’t feel ashamed to identify as one and then realize your something else. Take all the time in the world; only you can decide who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m here on Tumblr at miistical as well on DeviantArt and Twitter under the same name. I’m also on Instagram as miistical but that’s purely for everyday photos! If anyone is interested in my poetry, I’m on DeviantArt as hedonophobe (and will eventually get to making a poetry Tumblr account as well).

If anyone has any questions about me or my work/commissions or requests, feel free to email me at miisticalwrites@gmail.com!

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Thank you, Rachel, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.