Interview: Fiona

Today we’re joined by Fiona. Fiona is a wonderful visual artist and writer. For writing, Fiona is working on a number of stories at the moment and enjoys writing a variety of genres. She’s no less versatile when it comes to visual art, doing both traditional and digital art. Her work demonstrates a keen eye and an amazing attention to detail, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I both write and do visual art. Both vary quite a bit as I am currently working on 3 extended stories/novels and all three are vastly different genres. As for visual art, I used to do a lot of traditional art in varying media (acrylics, graphite, pen, etc.) and most of it was as realistic as I could get it. Now I do mainly digital art mainly because it’s hard to get materials for other forms and Photoshop has an undo button… My style in digital art is still fairly realistic but more comic book like with lines and kind of soft cell shading.

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What inspires you?

I have never been able to give this question a good answer. I guess I’ll do ‘who’ inspires me because I’m honestly coming up with a blank for ‘what’ inspires me. Currently I am working on a Sci Fi story/novel and that was really inspired by The Martian by Andy Weir because I really like the more realistic type of Sci Fi where it could conceivably happen. In my digital art, my style was inspired a lot by Fiona Staples’ art (Fionas are generally gr8) though my style has evolved a bit and is far from just copying what she does. (Hopefully.)

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was a little kid I drew so much it was ridiculous. Whales mainly for some reason. I kind of lived in the middle of nowhere and the only thing to do was draw or read so I did that 24/7. I blame that for why I like to write, read, and draw to this day. I never really wanted to do art as a job, I’m more science minded, but since I could remember I’ve loved to draw and I started writing extended stories in probably 6th grade.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not particularly… my stuff is way too all over the place to have a connected symbol of some sort.

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What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I know young artists have heard this time and time again but Practice. When I was younger I always was told I was good at art and it was just because that’s all I did. I never really took any formal art classes that would teach me how to draw (I did take some classes but they were more ‘studio time’ kind of things where the teacher didn’t actually teach anything.) I only started digital art the summer before last and already my stuff has vastly improved as I’ve gotten used to the media and practiced with it. Scrolling through my art blog you can see my improvement in digital stuff from my early posts to my more recent ones. Other than that I would just have advice for people who want to improve with anatomy which is take a life drawing class. If you can’t do that, watch a dance video or something and pause at different times to do drawings of different lengths. (10 seconds, 30 seconds, 5 minutes etc.) it really helped me a lot.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am sex repulsed and bi romantic (if you really want to get into it, demi romantic as well) basically I’m a massive amalgam of ‘hard to explain’ so I usually don’t go into it lol.

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Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, as far as my art goes, I just work in my room and post stuff online so I haven’t experienced much in that regards. I’ve encountered it a bit with just people I tell I’m ace (which honestly, hasn’t been that many people) but mainly it’s just along the lines of ‘wait that’s a thing?’. Ignorance as opposed to being outright mean basically.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Mitosis? Lol. No seriously I’d say the most common is that ace people are just people who ‘can’t get any’. Like, honey no. I just don’t want any.

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What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I’m really bad at giving advice like this lol but maybe just that a lot of people feel the same way you do and those who say it’s fake are just as ignorant as someone who looks at some characters in a language they don’t speak and insist that therefor, it isn’t a language. (Basically, those people are just ignorant and you should ignore them). Don’t ask me advice about coming out because I am just as lost about that.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My main blog is kvothe-kingkiller, my art blog is cork-run and I’m uploading one of my stories chapter by chapter as I finish them, both on my fictionpress account (cork-run) and AO3 (cork_run)

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Thank you, Fiona, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alex

Today we’re joined by Alex. Alex is a wonderful young  visual artist who does both digital and traditional art. They mainly do fanart and character design. Alex does a lot of drawing and painting, taking inspiration from the world around them. They are clearly a dedicated and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

bandit on the couch
Bandit on the Couch

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do a lot of digital and traditional art, mainly fan art or character design, though I’ve been trying to branch out a little more. I’m a big fan of taking things like animals, plants, or even songs, and turning them into characters. I really like picking out little details from whatever I studying and adding them into the design, even if no one but me notices them.

cd cover
CD Cover

What inspires you?

There are a lot of different things that inspire me. A lot of times it’s a song, or a bit from a song, a piece of conversation with a friend, a particular color or color palette, or even just a landscape or a small thought. For my fanart, a lot of times I get inspiration from other works, other people, or the other things I mentioned. A lot of time it’s music though. I listen to music a lot, both when I draw, and much of the other time. It really sets the mood for my day, and for what I draw

chasm
Chasm

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I started drawing when I was really little, and have always been interested in art, though I never really wanted to be an artist seriously until I started drawing more and more seriously (I wanted to be a geneticist when I was little, how funny is that). I started doodling whenever I could, and developed a consistent style, which ended up changing a lot over a short time. They were all doodles, but I really enjoyed it. I’ve begun drawing even more seriously, building up more materials, and expanding my horizons

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Northern Downpour

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I like to do little swirlies on my characters cheeks, shoulders, elbows, and knees, as well as highlights in the hair. I think that adds to part of my aesthetic around my art. this, as well as the highlight in the eyes, which, while usually a star, can also help me express the characters mood. These are some of the more recognizable stylistic things that I use in my drawings that I really enjoy.

drawing prompts book 1
Drawing Prompts Book 1

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing! I know I sound like a broken record, because this what everyone says, but it’s really true! Only through practice will you be able to find your own style, and then be able to develop it! It’s really quite amazing how much improvement your art can go through if you just draw something every day! You can also try expanding your horizons by challenging yourself. There are many different artist challenges that can really help, with either coloring, or just to help develop your style as well! You can study other artists’ art, and through that, improve your own art. You can also identify what you need to work on with your art, and challenge yourself to improve on that. For me, it’s things like posing and backgrounds, and challenging myself to work on them is both really interesting and fun, but also really beneficial for your art

flower cat
Flower Cat

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m more towards the sex repulsed side of the ace spectrum. I’m still trying to figure out the romantic stuff, but I’m pretty sure I’m panromantic. I think having a partner would be nice, but I don’t want to do anything more than cuddle and stuff.

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Jellyfish Ocean Contest

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I don’t really know about prejudice, per say. When I came out to my parents, they told me that I should keep an open mind when it came to everything that I told them. It was kind of a mental shove, and kind of led for me to tumble down a mental set of stairs. For a week or two I laid at the bottom of that flight of stairs. It wasn’t their fault at all, but it really set me back. I haven’t come out to many people, only about 6 or 7 outside my immediate family. my friends have been really supportive though, and that has really been helpful. Because of that, my sexuality has really become cemented, and has become a constant, which I’m immensely grateful for (though I still am open to any changes, I don’t think they’ll happen)

light witch
Light Witch

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I said earlier, I really haven’t come out to many people, and so the only misconceptions I’ve really seen are online. I haven’t really seen much hate either, the only misconceptions I’ve seen are In posts from aesexual people about aesexuality, and defending aesexuality against those misconceptions, if that makes any sense. I’ve been really lucky to have people support me, I know this, and I’m so grateful.

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Personified Phonix

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I’m not really too good with advice, or with advice about identity and that sort of thing, but I guess that they should take a break from thinking about it. This is coming from me, a hypocrite, who can’t go one minute without thinking about it, and who, before they came out to people, was constantly questioning everything. You shouldn’t let thinking and questioning things consume you. Take a walk, draw a picture, read a book, listen to music. Do something. Let your mind take a break. Take a mental deep breath. As I said, I’m not too good with advice, and freak out whenever someone says they look up to me, but I hope that some of this can help!

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Plant People

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m definitely most active on my Instagram, but anyone can find me pretty much anywhere with at screaming_pinepples (Tumblr, DeviantArt, RedBubble)

I hope you enjoy my art! And I hope that you like what I’ve had to say!

suzy
Suzy

Thank you, Alex, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Grace Schodel

Today we’re joined by Grace Schodel. Grace is a phenomenal visual artist who is currently studying in uni. She does both traditional and digital art, drawing a variety of subjects. Her art is remarkably beautiful, showing an incredible attention to detail and a masterful use of color, which draws the viewer in. She’s an incredibly passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My name’s Grace Schodel but I go by knittinganarchist online, I use the pronouns she/her, and I’m studying a bachelor in animation. My art is pretty all or nothing honestly! I use both traditional and digital mediums to either spend 3 months working on a series of conceptually similar drawings, or spend 3 minutes smashing out cute and stupid cartoony comics.

What inspires you?

Probably a mixture of a good colour palette, my drawings are all pretty heavily inspired by colour palettes that caught my imagination, and romanticizing everyday life. A lot of my drawings are about making mundane everyday things fun; my uni induced breakdowns are overdramatic and honest, forgotten gift cards are a cause for celebration, and messy hair can be a Look. I love positivity; at the moment I’m working on a series for an art show in February that focuses on the spacy disassociation I felt for most of my first year of uni, but instead of going over old wounds is supposed to represent me working through that feeling.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved art, but was never really allowed to think it was a viable option for my future. I did design after graduating school because I thought it was a good balance between creativity and responsibility. But I was miserable, and decided to just follow my heart instead and study animation.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t have hidden codes in my drawings, but now I kind of wish I did because that would be rad. The closest I have is that for a while now all my lineart is in two layers, one red one black and the black one is set to a lower opacity. I think it just makes the picture a little softer and adds something cool to the overall look.

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What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to use references. I spent so long feeling guilty for using reference photos or other artworks, that I tried to do everything from my head. In my opinion even tracing something is okay (as long as you don’t try to pass it off as your own original without giving credit) it helps immensely with anatomy, perspective, and developing your own “style”.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as a sex-neutral asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

In my field? No not really, everyone at my uni so far seems to be fairly open minded and accepting of everyone. But in my personal life I’ve been mostly met with confusion and disbelief, the classic “What happened to you?” and “But you wear short skirts and have dated before” get thrown around a bit. A few deeply uncomfortable conversations about sexual scenarios have happened where someone has said “Well, what if …. happened, would that make you normal?”, but I mostly just avoid that by only telling people who need to know, such as my boyfriend, and the close friends I trust.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Of course I can’t speak for everyone here, but personally its either been that I can’t be ace because I like dressing up nicely, and apparently people only do that to seem attractive so they can hook up? Or that aces are afraid of sex? Some aces may be, and that’s their choice to identify as ace, but its endlessly annoying so have to explain no I’m not afraid I’m just not interested.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s perfectly fine to have no interest in sex. It can seem the be all and end all of relationships and growing up, but honestly if it’s not for you, it’s not for you.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Either on my Facebook page where I offer commissions:
(https://www.facebook.com/knittinganarchist/)

Or my Instagram where I post a lot of my personal and uni work!
(https://www.instagram.com/knittinganarchist/)

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Thank you, Grace, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Aibne Hesarose

Today we’re joined by Aibne Hesarose. Aibne is a phenomenal visual artist who works mostly in traditional medium. They’re still developing their portfolio, but already demonstrate an extraordinary amount of talent. Their drawings are filled with detail and an incredible use of color. It’s clear Aibne has a very bright future ahead of them, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Friend

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m still very much in a developmental phase of my work. On the one hand I want to illustrate children’s books, and on the other I want to be a tattoo artist. There’s nothing stopping me from doing both, except maybe figuring out the logistics. In a sentence: my portfolio is in the teething stage.

What inspires you?

Sometimes I’ll be watching a noisy blockbuster or an indie horror film, or walking home and it will start raining, or I’ll be on a long drive, and I’ll start getting ideas. At the moment I’m doing the drawtober challenge run by vonn.art and gawki, and that has been a great push in learning to elaborate on a prompt which is something I normally struggle with.

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Inktober2017 12

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have been drawing ever since I was really little, and writing too, and I have always wanted to do both. It was only really after starting my writing degree at university that I really began to appreciate how much hard work, sheer luck and entrepreneurship is required to pursue a career in a creative field. I still want to be an author/illustrator, though. Those two areas are separate for me because, as creative practices, writing and art are mutually exclusive. They each have their own process, and even when I’m drawing something relevant to my writing, it’s like working from separate parts of my brain.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Because my style is still growing and changing, I haven’t really had the time to develop a signature thing. I do tend towards blending creepy or eerie characters with a calm, reassuring theme or palette, because that sort of juxtaposition interests me. I like it when things aren’t as they seem. It that adds to the visual narrative, and storytelling through art is half the fun.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Work hard. Keep working. Even when you can’t see improvement, even when you don’t feel like it, even when it isn’t immediately rewarding. Keep going.

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Inktober2017 14

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m plain old ace cake.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve had the regular comments – you haven’t met the right person, you should see a doctor, it’s probably hormonal, you’re just frigid, you’re just trying to be label yourself, maybe you’re just closeted, maybe you were abused, maybe maybe maybe. When I think it will help, I engage the person and do my best to educate. When it’s obviously not worth the time, I tell them to keep their nose out of my business.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably that it’s either denial, or a manifestation of illness. Basically, that asexuality is something that needs to be fixed. In relationships earlier in life when I was still figuring myself out, I had more than one partner treat my disinterest in sex as if it were a personal betrayal of some kind. I still battle sometimes with the automatic link people draw between love and sex – for me, it is possible to be very much in love with someone and not ever want to bang them. But unfortunately, most of the people I’ve loved feel unfulfilled by that.

TL;DR: my asexuality should not be an obstacle for other people – it is simply an aspect of me, and now that I’m a self-aware adult, I hate that other people feel entitled enough to my body to get upset by it.

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Inktober2017 25

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There is nothing wrong with you.

The world we were raised in has an attitude to sex that is not healthy. Everything is both hypersexualized and infused with shame. Too much significance is placed on losing virginity, how people have sex, who they have sex with, and how many partners they have.

In a way, it’s a very good thing to be naturally excluded from that shit.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My art is on Tumblr at http://aibne-hesarose.tumblr.com/ and on Instagram at Instagram.com/Aibne.Hesarose

My writing blog is write-it-all-down.tumblr.com.

space unicorn derby
Space Unicorn Derby

Thank you, Aibne, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: SilverStarStrike

Today we’re joined by SilverStarStrike. SilverStarStrike is a phenomenal aspiring visual artist who works with both traditional and digital mediums. She’s currently experimenting with a variety of styles and does take commissions. SilverStarStrike is a dedicated and passionate artist with a very bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I have been drawing actively for about 4 years. I mostly draw digital art but I can work with traditional mediums. I am seeking to expand my horizons with realism, 3D art, and other styles. I also take commissions and don’t draw absolutely for free.

What inspires you?

Almost everything really, but I take inspiration mostly from music and video games. As of right now, the game “Hollow Knight” is a huge drive for inspiration. My previous biggest inspirations are “Wreck-It Ralph” and “Ori and the Blind Forest.”

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I haven’t always wanted to be an artist. I actually wanted to be a paleontologist and a chef, but my interests in those fields died. Then when I discovered “Wreck-It Ralph” it drove me to create characters and ever since then, I have been drawing more actively.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I’m not entirely sure what you mean, but I do sign most of my own works with my own signature. I also don’t have a logo, but I do have a pretty common style that’s somewhat unique to myself, at least in my eyes.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing, and don’t give up. You’ll definitely improve if you put a lot of effort, love, and care into your work. If you just want art to be just a hobby, that’s fine as well, but that doesn’t mean your art is worth less than anybody else’s. Your art is wonderful, beautiful, and just downright gorgeous.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I kinda personally lean on more of the asexual spectrum. I don’t experience a lot of sexual arousal to anything, and honestly I even find myself sex-repulsive and I don’t feel so good when I think about sex. Usually results include nausea and just disgusting feelings in general. I don’t even wish to have children in the future.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have not yet actually, since I’m somewhat closeted about it. I do post asexual relating posts that I honestly can relate to, and my sexuality and pronouns are shown on my Deviantart profile. So far, everybody seems pretty accepting of my orientation.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuals are “broken.” I don’t believe in that. If they don’t want to have sex or any of the sort, then that’s fine with me. They’re all human beings, just like us.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t try fretting over it, and take your time thinking about it. Remember, your orientation is only just a part of who you are, and doesn’t entirely define you. Whether you’re bi, het, homo, or even ace, you’re special and beautiful.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Outside of Tumblr, I have a Deviantart account with the same name, SilverStarStrike. I also have a YouTube channel named Starflight LunaSpirit.

Thank you, SilverStarStrike, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Cheshire

Today we’re joined by Cheshire. Cheshire is a phenomenal visual artist and an aspiring animator. They do both digital and traditional art, favoring messy materials for traditional art. They absolutely love to draw and doodle, whether on paper or on their iPad. Their work shows a remarkable amount of detail as well as a wonderful use of color. It’s clear they have an incredibly bright future ahead of them, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m an aspiring animator and generally fun-loving digital and traditional artist. I mainly doodle on my iPad (Due to my lack of a laptop), as well as in my sketchbooks (Three of them, lol). I enjoy working with pencils and watercolour paints, and because I tend to do a lot of self-referential and colourful artworks I usually go with the messiest materials (Hence, watercolour).

What inspires you?

Pop culture, Personal experiences, music and the world around me. I’ve been heavily into popular culture since my constant-cartoon watching as a child (Nothing’s changed.), which is why my art style tends to be a mix of both styles close to anime and western cartoons. In terms of personal experience, that all tends to be related to my darker artworks, and the ones inspired by things that have made me anxious or generally feel like crap emotionally. Music is because of my all-over-the-place music tastes, as for instance I could be drawing something completely cute when listening to a sweet love song, or something violent or angry when listening to metal (Which is most of my playlists), or something inspired by a musical. The world around me could just be someone’s outfit, an animal I saw, or the landscapes I come across on my adventures to and from home.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I never really had any role models for getting into art until I got into my junior year of high school. I had always like drawing, and have been doing so since I was five, but I never really wanted to pursue a career in it until I started looking into watercolour art at the start of eleventh grade, and then animation at the end of that year. I wanted to be a music teacher (I am terrible at music), a juvenile justice worker, a youth counsellor, but eventually settled into animation, as I felt that it was the best way to improve my art and share the stories I make up with people.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nope! It’s not that I have a simple trick I’m not willing to share, but more that I just… don’t have one? I tend to do whatever I want with my art and what people see is what they get. There’s no secret to it.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Your art is unique to you. Your style, your methods, your materials, they are yours. If you spend all your time comparing yourself to other artists you tend to be discouraged, and honestly, that’s the last thing you want. What you do what to do is look at other people’s art and their methods and be inspired, as in ‘Oh, I didn’t know I could do that’. Don’t compare yourself to someone who is probably also in the same boat as you. You’re doing your best, and even though that may not seem like much, it’s enough for you. And even if you don’t like that one piece you did, someone else will, and may even see it in a way that you didn’t.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m pan-romantic grey-ace. I don’t really know where I am on the spectrum. I mean, I’m not attracted to anyone in a sexual way, but I’m not totally against the idea of doing-the-do. I’m not sex-repulsed at all, but I’d only do it if I as completely sure I could trust the person I was with.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

More just ignorance than anything. No one really knows how to understand it and I’m terrible at explaining it. Even then, I don’t upfront say ‘Oh I’m ace”, but more let it out later as I know the person. I honestly find it easier to just say ‘Oh I wouldn’t do a one-night-stand with anyone, and generally just… don’t feel a need to do it at all?’ It’s hard to explain to people when I don’t really understand it myself.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’m celibate. Like no, sweetie, I’d do it, but I just don’t feel like it. That’s all it is. I’m not resigning myself to a vow of celibacy because boy howdy smooching people is a nice feeling and I’m lonely and would love an s/o, but I just… don’t care about sex?

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay if you’re confused. Your identity doesn’t have to be your defining point, so there’s no pressure to really understand it. It’s also okay to tell people. They may not explicitly understand what you’re dealing with, but telling someone can help you deal with what can be extremely stressful. And if people tell you that the A in the full LGBTQ+ acronym means ‘Ally’, tell them to fight you. The A can stand for Ally, Ace and Aro and no one can take your identity away from you.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Instagram, Art Amino, DA and Tumblr!

I don’t use my Tumblr much lately due to school stress, but it’s serpentine-jellyfish. Between all the memes I post, I sometimes post my art there.

My Insta is where I post a majority of my art, from doodles to fully-completed works. I should get an art account, but honestly? I completely content with posting everything on the one account. My Instagram is serpentine._.jellyfish (temporarily changed for Halloween: https://www.instagram.com/serpentine._.spookfish/)

Art Amino I don’t use too much as it takes up space on my iPad, and is Serpentine Jellyfish. I post a lot of stuff there when I do have it.

My DA is the different one, and is Thoughtful-Melonlord. I don’t post there very often at all, as I’m generally just too lazy to log back in and out, and when I do post, it’s using the iPad app, which has terrible interfacing by the way.

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Thank you, Cheshire, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Lyds

Today we’re joined by Lyds. Lyds is a fantastic visual artist who does both traditional art and digital art. She loves to draw and has a very unique style. Aside from drawing, Lyds also does a bit of writing. She has a phenomenal enthusiasm for her craft, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

With my art, I mainly do drawing both traditionally and digitally. I’m also trying to work on a story, which may be written out or put into more of a comic form.

What inspires you?

I mainly get inspired from my friends or other artists I see online. There’s quite a few artists I watch work on YouTube which gets me thinking about what I want to work on next.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I can’t quite think of anything too specific that got me into this field, I’ve kind of always been into drawing and writing.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t think I have too much of a unique signature besides some of my artwork I do is all done with dots.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

One main thing that I would advise is to keep practicing and working on your skill as much as possible. Also, don’t compare yourself to others because we all have different styles and are all at different points of our time as artists. The only time I’d say comparing is all right is when you compare your old work with your new work, it does help to see the progress that you’ve made and encourages you to continue making even more progress.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual, romance and gender are things I still have yet to fully figure out for myself.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

The only time I can really think of where I faced ignorance is when explaining my story idea to a teacher where no one has sex for fun or for reproduction and she couldn’t see how anyone would be able to form relationships with each other. She then told me to really consider how two people would get into a relationship and how that might look and to possibly do research on asexuality. In response, I kind of just said, “Oh, I kinda am asexual so…” Besides that I can’t think of any other specific situation.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That basically I just haven’t met the right person yet and once I do I’ll change my mind.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t worry too much about having a specific label that fits you, if for now asexual or a-spec is close enough to what you think you identify as, then that is perfectly fine. Labels change sometimes and we sometimes learn more about ourselves, which result in changing a label. Just be yourself, we’re all here to support each other.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

On Tumblr I have an art blog (though sometimes I forget to post) called liimiim-haywaas-art and then I also post my artwork on Instagram I’m liimiim.haywaas.art. I don’t have much of my writing posted anywhere, there’s a few poems that I’ve written on my other Tumblr lyds-likes-to-write but I don’t post there too often.

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Thank you, Lyds, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.