Interview: Jai M. King

Today we’re joined by Jai M. King, who was interviewed quite a while ago. Their company has since evolved into something almost completely new. Jai is a fascinating and unique artist that has a style that’s entirely their own. They’re behind Madjaw Dolls, a brand gearing toward multimedia arts. They do a lot of illustrations but also quite a lot of writing as well. Jai is currently working on a science fiction series, which is part of the Madjaw Dolls universe. Based on their interview, Jai is a fascinating and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

(WARNING: Some images contain nudity and are risque)

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King watercolor

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Madjaw Dolls is brand gearing towards the multimedia arts. There is one main universe in which all products and creations stem from. The stories under MJD combine influences of retro-fantasy, raypunk and Grimm’s fairytales to create a distinct branch of dark tales that are both innovative in terms of character and world design but also blunt in terms of political and social commentary.

My work ranges from traditional illustration to digital most recently with working on the IPad Pro. I am also going into producing for multimedia to expand MJD so I am also a creative director in collaborative projects.

Currently I’ve been in the process of producing a science fiction series called “Sector M.I.” which takes you through a multi-world war. The world design is very distinct to the universe in which a multitude of my stories derive from. Most of what will be seen at Madjaw Dolls exists within that universe.

What inspires you?

My inspirations range from the array of media I grew up on to naturally being attracted to retro-media such as anime/manga from the 1970s-1990s to western influences such as Ralph Bakshi’s “Cool World” to much of the bizarre fantasy works from the 1970s and also the strange futuristic narrative of 1970s funk music. I also grew up loving the Grimm Brothers which has influenced my work and story process quite a bit. I love creating words that feel at least a little uncomfortable. A lot of my work has a warped quality that I’ve developed purposefully for the stories. I’m not so much about supplying reality as I’m about creating something entirely new.

Since my last interview with Asexual Artists I do think I’ve returned to my roots a little more with my influences. Every project I take on entails a good amount of research which I personally love as I often find that people tend to overlook just how much time and research it takes to develop a well-crafted creative process. I think my influences change the more I grow and learn.

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Kingfin

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been illustrating since I was little though around 17 was when I landed my first job illustrating a children’s book, though I didn’t know very much about illustrating at the time and taking on the process of illustrating a book was hard, I learned a lot about what to do and what not to do when illustrating books. I went back and forth for a while as I was potentially good at so many things, ultimately illustration is where my roots have always been, I’ve been looking into multimedia producing for the very reason that I can expand in the future through different platforms and ways to tell the stories, starting with graphic novels; which the graphic novels under MJD will be a combination of written and illustrative narrative, a format I’ve been working on to be a little more unique to MJD.

I learned quite a bit in the last year after interning for another comic artist and developing sound connections with illustrators and comic artists who’ve helped me a lot with both communications and not to let the mainstream dictate my vision.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

At the moment, I’m working on the first installation under “Sector M.I.” Which is currently titled “The Hanged Man’s Plan” though changes are always possible in editing. I’ve been quiet about much of the story, in previous experiences I’ve had, I’ve learned to do so, haha. What I will say is that HMP occurs 200 years prior to the main events of “Sector M.I.” It was a story I started last year, nixed, and then decided that it had more potential as it establishes the birth of a lineage with one of the main characters of SMI, King. At least right now, all of the stories will be told in relatively short books, similar to a children’s book, but with a more mature story. HMP is relatively benign compared to what I have lined up for the future editions in the series. All of the stories cover particularly controversial subjects, one of the mains in HMP suffers through a smear campaign within his own workplace, and there’s a huge focus on the destruction and outcome of jealousy as well as laying the groundwork for the world seen in “Sector M.I”

The story has undergone rights and registration along with the entirety of the Sector M.I. series so it’s a matter of completely the first story. I’ve been experiencing the ever-so-lovely world of publishing but I’ll be happy when it’s done.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Take pride in the effort you put into your work, but always be open to learn more. It’s a process first and foremost, there is no golden finish line where you’ve made it as an artist. The moment you close yourself off to growth, you’ve basically cheated yourself from the next level of your journey. It takes time, and at times it really sucks. Also, if you have an idea you believe in, don’t bend to please other people. I’ve learned that the hard way throughout my journey so far, there are literally thousands of ways to be an artist, if one idea doesn’t work, keep pushing and don’t take no for an answer when you know what you have to offer. Also process the rights to your work, haha I also learned that the hard way after experiencing content theft!

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m still asexual and aromantic, I don’t really know if that will ever change.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Yes and no. It’s not so much in my field as it has been coming out of art school. Oddly enough, most would think art school is particularly accepting of every type of person but I’ve learned the opposite. My art tends to trickle over into my daily outfits, I still work as a creative director for photo shoots from time to time, so I love to express through creating extravagant outfits, but I’ve found that with creating flamboyant outfits people tend to assume you’re an equally flamboyant person. Flamboyance has its own set of stereotypes as people assume I’m someone who goes out and dates a lot or dressing up to impress others. I’m a bit of a contradiction in that sense, how I dress is mostly because I love to create myself every day, it’s an extension of my art to me. I’ve faced the expectation to “stop being ace” because of what someone else expects or wants and it’s very uncomfortable. It’s disturbing that much of society doesn’t accept no as a valid answer when it comes to relationships (this is when “no” should be taken as an answer!).

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I would say for me that it’s a phase. Or that I’m waiting for some knight in shining armor to save me from asexuality as for me, it was never a choice. I can’t speak for every asexual but I have always been this way, though there were times in high school before I knew who I was, where I tried to date and be “normal” due to social pressures. In many communities, even in black/mixed communities, asexuality isn’t fully accepted due to the heavy stigmas black people still face. Black women tend to automatically be sexualized and stereotyped (and it’s even worse for non-binary folks, as I am as well) that it’s even harder to say I’m asexual without being laughed at or denied.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Definitely to speak up when you feel uncomfortable. If you feel like someone is pressuring you, speak up and leave the situation. You shouldn’t have to explain who you are to those who don’t get it.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

“The Hanged Man’s Plan” is still in production, so whenever all the cards are in place is when it will come out, there’s no telling how long it may take but I’ve recently be finishing the process for the rights and registration for “Sector M.I.” and Madjaw Dolls so it’s all in that awkward phase of planning to put out actual products and not just prints of works.

http://madjawdolls.com/
https://www.instagram.com/madjawdolls/
https://www.facebook.com/Madjawdollsmjd/
https://twitter.com/MadjawDolls

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Thank you, Jai, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Clara Quinion

Today we’re joined by Clara. Clara is a phenomenal science fiction writer who is quite prolific. To date, she has written three novels, a number of short stories, and some poetry as well. It is quite apparent that she has an incredibly bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write science fiction. Also bits of art, photography, and craft.

What inspires you?

Everything. I’m a highly sensitive introvert with synesthesia. I take in more sensory impressions than most people, spend a long time mulling them over, making connections, and come out with some interesting thought-experiments.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I used to draw all the time when I was a kid. During my teens I got more into photography, and thought that would be my career. That didn’t work out. I got into writing by serendipity: having failed to get into any arts courses at university, I applied for a bunch of other creative courses through clearing, and got into an English with Creative Writing degree.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I write in a multiverse called The Sustained World: all worlds capable of sustaining intelligent life lined up, separated by the Void, yet transversible. The denizens of The Sustained World are called Eltoids, which is a wider definition than humanoid, and means creatures capable of intelligence, communication, and manual dexterity, the symbol of which is a three-noded triangle. I’m also working a lot with black crow imagery: in The Sustained World, the Reapers who take the spirits of the deceased to the Void take the shape of crows.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Do your own thing. Not what’s popular. Not what you think will sell. Not what everyone else is doing. Your own thing. You don’t have to be the best at your medium. Being authentic is much more important.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual and biromantic/panromantic. And queer, as far as I think that gender roles are arbitrary rubbish.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Nothing comes to mind. In the past I haven’t actually spoken much about not wanting to have sex. Just kept quiet and nodded along when people bring such things up. I have a pretty filthy sense of humour and I don’t mind talking about sex at all, but I always get uncomfortable if I see sexual imagery.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Not directly, but I feel that it’s been indicated to me that being sexually active is like a further step in developing towards adulthood. Probably by the same sort of people who think getting drunk is a sign of maturity. Knowing yourself and what you like and don’t like is a great step in your development.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There is nothing wrong with you. Sex is not a fundamental need like eating and sleeping. It’s more like an interest. I have no interest in sex just as I have no interest in sports. We are all different, and that’s what makes us beautiful. Do your thing, and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re wrong because you don’t like what they like.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

http://thesustainedworldatransverse.tumblr.com/ and www.facebook.com/ClaraQuinionWriting

Thank you, Clara, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jen

Today we’re joined by Jen. Jen is a phenomenal painter who uses oil paints on canvas. She creates a wide variety of different images in various genres: science fiction, fantasy, and even some fanart. Her work demonstrates a keen imagination and a beautiful use of color and line. It’s very obvious that she loves painting and it shows in her work. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

portrait
Portrait

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a traditional painter — oils on canvas. The bigger the better, but I’m running out of room to store them all. I paint a lot of landscapes, mostly science fiction or fantasy, sometimes abstract or modern stuff, some fan art (Elder Scrolls, Dragon Age, Mass Effect, and Witcher fandoms), and I dabble in bit of fanfiction as well.

What inspires you?

So many other artists! The natural world, video games, books, colors or textures I’ve seen. Smells. Dramatic scenes. Music. Lighting. Inspiration can come from the most mundane and sometimes the funniest most unlooked for places. Never take it for granted.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I was never the kid with the sketchbook when I was young. I started collecting Star Wars comics and art books when I was in high school. I remember looking through one of the art books and seeing Ralph McQuarrie’s matte paintings for the original trilogy and realizing that people did this for a living. So I started drawing on my own. I went to two semesters of state college and then pleaded (I was splitting the cost w/ family) to transfer to art school. I had to take a painting course as part of my major. It was challenging but I ended up loving it and although I dropped out before completing the degree, I have now been painting for over fifteen years and am starting to work towards making a career out of it.

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Winter Medley

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Along with my signature, I add a thumbprint. I don’t know if that’s all that special.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Besides the obvious one of: practice, practice, practice? I’d add that it’s important to have as much variety in your education as possible: Sculpture, digital, drafting, even dance. It all helps your brain learn to translate light, movement, color, and form and perspective from two dimensions into three and back again. Diversity is key. Lots of different media, lots of different subject matter. That and learn some solid financial and organizational habits. Boring, but it will help keep you in food and work.

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Urdnot Wrex

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am demi/ace/autochorisexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Mostly, I don’t tell people. But even so I’ve encountered a bit when it’s come up as to why I’m single and not dating. Ignorance more than anything else. Many people have not heard of it. Those of an ‘old-fashioned’ mindset insist I’d be happier with a husband and children. As if I don’t know what I’m talking about. Some tend to think it’s a trend or an affect to gain some kind of reputation or attention like I’m putting on some kind of special snowflake act.

Then there is the preconception that artists are somehow more passionate than other people…so it follows that they should be more promiscuous, too, right?

I’ve also been told, mostly by men although I did hear it from at least one woman, that if I’m ‘not getting any’ that I’m somehow stifling my own artistic ability and creative process? Which is as ridiculous as it is manipulative crap and very annoying.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I’ve sought to learn more, I’ve noticed a lot of folks struggling to understand what asexual is and getting it confused with being bisexual or pansexual. They just take all these terms that they don’t understand and lump them together.  The gender preference (or lack thereof) regarding any potential partner is an entirely different aspect of human sexuality. A person can be asexual and bi, asexual and pan, asexual and gay, asexual and straight, etc. Asexuality deals with the lack of sex drive and/or sexual attraction and/or interest in having sex.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Take your time with it. You don’t have to meet anyone else’s expectations. Figuring yourself out is a lifelong process. You are allowed to learn and grow and change your mind as often as you need to about who/what you are. Society still places a lot of pressure on people to be in relationships. If a relationship makes you happier and healthier, then fine. If not, that’s fine too.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I post on Tumblr. http://caffeinatedmusing.tumblr.com/
My portfolio is http://jenniferward.foliohd.com/  and I have some prints and such available on Society6 https://society6.com/jwardart_2016

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The Ritual

Thank you, Jen, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Dragon Harris

Today we’re joined by Dragon Harris. Dragon is a wonderful visual artist who is currently studying illustration. She’s fond of drawing things related to mythology, fantasy, and science fiction (awesome!). Dragon is inspired by a number of things and is obviously very enthusiastic about art. She’s definitely someone who has a bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m an art student at BYU, currently applying for their illustration program.  My favorite things to illustrate are scenes from mythology, fantasy, or science fiction.

What inspires you?

That’s a bit like asking “where do you get your ideas?”  My religion, my favorite music, my family, the landscape I live in, the work of other artists — it all mixes up in my head and cool ideas result.

I especially like the work of James A. Owen.  His art always inspires me.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing since I was big enough to hold a crayon, but I didn’t decide to try making a career out of it until my last year of high school.  I’d been looking at a few different scholarships and realized that the only ones that interested me were for art students.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nope.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing and studying.  There’s always more to learn, from books, other artists, and your own experiences.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual.  No idea on the romantic side.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

So far, I haven’t run into prejudice.  I have had a few headaches over how sexualized the art world can get, but my university has a lot of folks who think like me involved in the program so it’s not too bad.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t exist or are just confused.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

The person you are right now is an okay person to be. No one is “normal,” and it’s more important to be decent to other people than to fit in.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m on Twitter, (at) enoughdragons, Tumblr, (at) onedragontorulethemall, and WordPress, at dragonharris.wordpress.com. The WordPress blog is where I post most of my essays and thoughts on life.

Thank you, Dragon, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Nick

Today we’re joined by Nick. Nick is a fantastic writer who specializes in fantasy, science fiction, and mainstream fiction. Although he’s currently unpublished, he hopes to change that soon. He has just started a project with an ace protagonist. It’s very clear that he has a great love for the art of writing. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer!  I write fantasy, Sci-Fi and mainstream fiction. Depending on what I’m writing, I prefer novels to short stories, since it gives me a little more space to world build (probably my favorite part of writing fantasy).  I love writing stories with strong characters and fascinating worlds that those characters can explore.

What inspires you?

Anything and everything! Seeing a picture of something in a magazine, conversations with friends, everything!  I never throw anything away and have a big folder on my computer of just old ideas that didn’t come to fruition.  Conversations with other writers inspire me, tossing ideas around and seeing what happens.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a fan of stories.  I loved world building, exploring the physics of alien planets or worlds with magic.  I always liked with creating magical creatures and monsters when playing pretend.  At some point, I just started writing them down and had a blast.

I don’t know if I’ve always wanted to be a writer.  I was the worst speller in 3rd grade, so if you’d asked me then, I never would have said it.  But in high school, I started writing longer stories for my own entertainment and people enjoyed what I was creating.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

No real single thing. I like having surprises and twists, but most of my stories tend to focus around the development and creation of the characters.  I like having characters with unique perspectives (deaf or blind characters, characters in oppressed positions, non-human characters).  I believe that diversity in a book is incredibly important.

I also like having a splash of comedy in whatever it is I’m writing.  Just cause we’re hunting dragons doesn’t means there isn’t room for a barbeque joke.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t give up.  It’s hard to make a creative endeavor work the first time through.  That’s why we have drafts.  They’re formal permission to mess up.  It doesn’t have to perfect every draft.  Just try things and get it on paper.  From there, just edit and rewrite until you get something you like.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I consider myself demisexual, but I’m unsure at the moment.  I’ve only recently started identifying on the spectrum, so I’m still not sure.  I still consider myself heteromantic, but identify on the ace spectrum.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

One thing I’ve really noticed is the erasure of asexuality in general.  Not just in media, but also in the community in general.   I feel like asexual characters are very hard to come by in normal writing.  Romantic relationships, usually culminating in sex, seem to be the norm.  I enjoy characters with strong connections, but don’t think they need to be sexual all the time (particularly in YA and Adult).

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s not a real thing. Which is very confusing when first attempting to understand it.  I’ve heard that it’s not a real thing and that anyone who says they’re ace is trying to invade the LGBTQ+ community, particularly if they’re attracted to people of the opposite gender.  I’ve seen a lot of angry messages directed toward aces online, but I haven’t had the chance to interact with the larger community.  I’ve met many people very accepting, but some discussions I’ve seen have been less than friendly.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You’re not wrong.  It feels wrong, but you’re perfectly fine not wanting sex, not having sex or not feeling like you need sex.  It’s hard to find words for it, but you’re perfectly OK for not knowing yet.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Come check me out my Tumblr!

I have some writing hidden around there and there are plenty of other things for you to check out on there.

Thank you, Nick, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Lib

Today we’re joined by Lib. Lib is a fantastic writer who is currently a hobbyist and incredibly passionate about the art. They have written a number of different things. They’re currently playing around with screenwriting and considering some historical fiction, though science fiction seems to be the genre Lib’s most enthusiastic about. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write speculative fiction as a hobby. For me the biggest part of writing is answering the question “what if”. I’ve written a couple of short fantasy stories, but my heart is set on science fiction and adaptive screenwriting. Lately, though, I’ve surprised myself and starting thinking about historical fiction. I wrote a short two and a half minute screenplay for a class and the piece was well received. I’m currently doing historical research to see if I can adapt the short piece into a full-length feature script. Part of the reason I’ve shied away from historical fiction is the amount of research involved. My dad’s a history teacher so if I do take the historical fiction route I want my pieces to be as historically accurate as possible and still be interesting. History shouldn’t be boring.

What inspires you?

I draw inspiration from music and folk songs. I like how short and to the point music lyrics have to be while at the same time maintaining beauty. I try to shape my stories the same way and say what needs to be said in as little words as possible and using as many perfect words as possible. I know a sentence is meant to be when there are no other words that are more suitable. I also draw inspiration from other art like TV shows, movies, and other books. One of my literature professors talked about “writing in the gaps” and it has become my favorite phrase for what I do. I don’t have to be truly original to be a good writer, I can add to the existing narrative by filling in the gaps. I had another professor say “it’s all fanfiction until you get paid”, but I like the filling in the gaps phrase better.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was in middle school. During summer break I would read at least one book a day powering through 200 pages or more. My dad made an offhand comment about me becoming the “next Anne McCaffery” because that’s what I was reading at the time. For me that’s when the light bulb went off in my head that I really could do that. That dream hasn’t gone away and the potential is still there, but I’m working really hard to perfect my own brand and style. I don’t just want to be a writer, or even just a published writer, I want to be proud of myself and my craft. Arthur Conan Doyle once said, “If in 100 years I am only known as the man who invented Sherlock Holmes then I will have considered my life a failure.” So, I’ve strived to create work that I can be proud of for myself.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Even before I knew what asexuality was, I’ve had it in my writing. I have ten rules that I use for writing with the purpose that it will diversify my character set and storytelling. I know Harry Potter was really popular when its day, but I’m making a point to write about someone other than a young white male as my protagonist. This practice won’t make me a mainstream writer, but after discovering my asexual/aromantic identity I cannot in good conscious write mainstream characters. I also put a lot of thought into my antagonists and villains. Often the villains become my favorite characters because I can sympathize with them and see their point of view. Are they really villainous? Or is it just that they can’t find “true love” in a sexually/romantically charged society and are demonized for it?

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

The difference between an amateur and a professional is a professional is an amateur who never gave up. As my favorite writer/philosopher Joseph Campbell said, “Follow your bliss.”

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m an aromantic asexual. I can feel aesthetic and sensual attraction, but I’ve never felt sexual attraction. I’ve only felt romantic attraction once, but I still choose to identity as aromantic instead of demi-romantic because that’s the identity I’m most comfortable with and feel describes my experience best.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve experienced general acephobia and prejudice like people saying asexuality isn’t a real orientation, it’s a Tumblr fad, etc… When I came out to my parents they said I just “haven’t met the right one”. I’ve found that the best way to deal with acephobia is advocacy and education. People have been told all their lives that true love is between a man and a woman. I get asked constantly if I have “another half”, but I find it empowering to think that as an aro-ace, I am perfectly whole. I don’t need another half because I’m not incomplete and I don’t need a soulmate because I’m not half a soul either. This is a really hard idea for people to understand though because they’re basically trained to think that it’s expected to grow up, get married, and have kids. Even LGBT individuals grow up now thinking marriage and kids by adoption or surrogacy. Saying I don’t want even a relationship is going against everything people have been ever taught.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’m missing something. Like being single is proof that I’m defective. Being asked if I have a boyfriend/girlfriend is usually one of the first questions people ever ask me. I usually choose to avoid the question saying I consider my relationships to be private. It is private. I know we’re so used to having everything about us out in the open for everyone to see on social media, but even social media has privacy settings. We can choose what we share with others.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I was 25 and living in a conservative state when I discovered I was asexual. My exact words were “Holy shit, I’m queer!” and I was absolutely terrified. Suddenly everyone I had ever known and complete strangers seemed to have a license to hate me just because of who I am. But then I called down and gave myself time to adjust to the idea and now I’m very happy with my labels. Slapping a label on me didn’t magically change who I was. I was always aromantic and asexual, but now I have the words to describe my experience and as a writer, words are everything to me.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I keep a Tumblr account [https://write4nom.tumblr.com/] and a blog [https://acubedblog.wordpress.com/]

Thank you, Lib, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Trinity

Today we’re joined by Trinity. Trinity is an awesome up and coming author who specializes in fantasy and science fiction. She currently has two books out: What I Have to Say to the World and I am the Snow (both available on Amazon). She has a wonderful enthusiasm for writing and has a very bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am an author. I love writing about many different topics, especially scifi and fantasy. There are some stories I have published myself which are easy to find on Amazon. I also post stories on Wattpad (TrinityAR).

What inspires you?

The thing that inspires me the most is my overwhelming dislike of clichés. I try my best not to use a lot of them unless the plot calls for it. If not that, I would say something that inspires me is historical events and myths. Especially Native American stories, which are used quite a lot in my novels.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

This is pretty easy to answer. When I was in about preschool, my mom signed me up for this reading testing or something, which revealed that I had a pretty high reading level (at the time, it was about an eighth grade level). My mom also noticed I always made stories with the refrigerator magnets.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

As mentioned before, I use a lot of Native American folktales. They help me develop more of the plot and provide necessary character development.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Not every story needs romance. Most of the time, it’s unnecessary and boring. Also, if an idea comes to your mind, write it down immediately so you don’t forget later.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am an asexual/demiromantic. Probably the only reason I’d ever have sex is to have children.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, as supportive as my parents are, they think my asexuality is something that needs fixing or something that they deny exists. It doesn’t matter to me. I know they love me and I am very happy being an ace. As far as other people go, I use sarcastic humor.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception about asexuality is when people say “oh, so you’re a plant.” Like, pfft, no, I’m a starfish.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Be proud of who you are. Don’t believe the crap that people tell you. Cause, you know, we got preferences, yo.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Wattpad account: TrinityAR
My books on Amazon: “What I have to say to the world” and “I am the snow

Thank you, Trinity, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.