Interview: Orlagh

Today we’re joined by Orlagh. Orlagh is a phenomenal young photographer who specializes in nature photography. Though young, Orlagh plans to continue pursuing art. His work captures the beauty of nature, filled with vivid colors and capturing plants and animals native to Wales. It’s clear he’s a dedicated and passionate artist with a bright future ahead of him, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I have been taking photos for around 4-5 years, and have been drawing for much longer than that. Mainly my photos are of plants and animals native to my area, and my other works are of anything and everything! Currently I am pursuing a GCSE qualification in art, and am working on my theme of highlands.

What inspires you?

I have grown up in a house with a big garden, quite overgrown and sprawling with wildlife. I have found a lot of comfort in spending time there because of the privacy it provides, and that has given me a real appreciation of nature. I also have family living in a rural area, and the frequent visits throughout my childhood involved a lot of hiking!

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My dad has a subscription to National Geographic magazine, which is filled with detailed photographs. I never read the articles, but would look through the images accompanying them. It was always quite clear in my mind that I wanted to go somewhere with my art, be it the drawings or the photos, but I have never been certain what that would be.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Sometimes I wish I did! I can admire someone who puts so much time into making their work unique in such a subtle way.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I would say that, no matter how unhappy you are with something you have made or done, you will have finished a better artist than before you started.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual, plain and simple!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have not had any significant experiences, but there are always uneducated people in my classes who will pick on any minority. I have found a group of LGBT+ people who I can spend time with in these classes, and I think being in a group helps a lot.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I think, because I’m quite introverted, people assumed my identity is caused by a lack of interaction with other people – which is very frustrating.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are allowed to be uncomfortable with any references to or sexual actions, especially in TV shows or books. It is not a problem that you don’t enjoy watching the things other people do. Try to find more representation online of asexual people instead, for example the webcomic Under the Aegis by vimeddiee.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have sparsely filled a National Geographic’s Your Shot account: Orlagh Williams. Other than that I don’t have anything…

Thank you, Orlagh, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Tatiana

Today we’re joined by Tatiana. Tatiana is a phenomenally talented photographer from Uruguay. She is currently working on her thesis to graduate from the Visual Arts University. Tatiana has taken part in exhibitions and experimented in various types of photography. Her work is remarkably beautiful, showing an amazing vividness and capturing the beauty and uniqueness of life. She’s a remarkably talented artist with an incredibly bright future, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a photographer, simple as that. I love going out on a cloudy day to capture pictures but I also love experimenting, I’ve tried pinhole photography, black and while film photography, color film photography, lab processing in the traditional and in the experimental way, digital photography (of course) and now I’m developing an interest in conservation and in color management. Many times people ask me why don’t I try to do graphic design or filmmaking but I think photography is broad and interesting enough for me.

What inspires you?

I think mostly light and nature. Photography IS light, is amazing how you can start to understand the light and to not take it for granted, light is an extremely cheeky thing but when you got to work well with it you can create amazing things.

To explain how nature influences my work in a few words is difficult; I grew up surrounded by nature, rocky beaches and a beautiful botanical park around the corner.

I think modern society is so humanist and so stressed by the pressure of productivity that we forget that we ARE nature and that we should give time to ourselves to just enjoy the silence and realize that we are the same as a flower or a snail.

I also found so much inspiration in the concepts of “mono no aware”, “wabi sabi” and in the work of Claude Monet, Duane Michals, Banana Yoshimoto & Piet Mondrian but I don’t want to write a Bible so please look it up if you are interested.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Until I was 14 I wanted to be a marine biologist, I grew up watching Discovery documentaries and as I mentioned, I visited every year a beautiful beach where I would pick different types of algae to “investigate it” hahaha. One day I started to hear that I wouldn’t go too far studying biology and that I would end up enclosed in a lab 24/7. After that I wanted to study publicity as my sister but I started a free photography workshop and I got completely hooked, I left the class the first day and I though “I want to do this for the rest of my life”.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Mmm, I tend to jump from one style to the other, having grainy black and white pictures one day to have something minimalistic and pastel the other but I think that something that’s always present is geometry, I love working with lines and seeing how the weight of the composition changes as I change the angle or distance to my object. Heavy diagonal lines and semi circles are frequently present in my compositions; I tend to follow the rule of thirds a lot.

Talking about things that are NOT frequent in my works it would be people, I can’t for the life of me photograph people, I mean I’ve done it and will do it again if I have to but I really dislike it, I’m a very awkward and introverted person so I really don’t feel comfortable having to guide someone and praying that they have patience while I do my work.

Also conceptually I like to show how many things that AREN’T portraits can be photographed, in my class 7/10 people were solely dedicated to portraits and half of them concentrating in sensuality and sexuality. One day this idea struck me “in the times of the vanguards, sex was taboo so the artists depicted sex, now introspection and empathy is taboo so I’ll depict introspection and empathy, the art world fights for who’s more original and daring and scandalous, I’ll protest in a silent way, I’ll show a garden without humans”.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Take your time figuring out what you want to do, read and investigate a lot about art, even if you encounter artists and styles or techniques you don’t like, having perspective is crucial not only to be an artist but also to be a human being.

Try to talk to people and create contacts and networks, I’m not saying this in a manipulative way, is just something that I realized now as time went by, having friends in the field creates a network where information flow and you help each other, eventually creating chances of expanding the influence of your work. Most of my college years I spent them on my own but when I opened up to my classmates and teacher I got a big caudal of information and opportunities I could not have had otherwise.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Heteroromantic Ace.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well to be honest I’m not publicly out. My country is open about LGTB+ in some areas but in other ones different sexualities are still questioned and asexuality is still invisible here.

I tried to come out to friends and some college classmates but I wasn’t specific enough and they just took it as I was being shy or embarrassed.

In college being ace in the closet was actually bothersome since so many of our classes talked about sex and showed oversexualised artists and pieces (at some point I got tired of seeing Nobuyoshi Araki pictures in the lessons). I’m all about expressing our sexualities freely and with no prejudices but day after day seeing sexual pieces and hearing teaches saying my work was not daring enough, was not bold enough really made me tired.

Good lord I remember we were assigned to attend a “performance party” where we had to go dressed as some artist we were randomly given, I didn’t go because I was afraid of what I could see. Said and done, one of my friends told me that someone appeared naked covered in dulce de leche with cookies attached to their whole body and another person went also naked with a lettuce covering their crotch….

Outside of college, high school went smoothly as I wasn’t pressured by my friends to have sex (bless them, my best friends are really sexual but never pressured or made fun of me) and I didn’t even realized I wasn’t your typical straight until my 20’s.

In my family I have low-key been telling them that yes, I want a boyfriend but I don’t have any urges to have sex anytime soon and I’m suspecting they think I’m lesbian but well is not like being lesbian is a bad thing so until they actually realize I’m ace and while they’re not being hostile I’m fine.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That ace people don’t know what sex is or that we’re kind of alien/robots who don’t understand human emotions, I make sexual jokes, I know what’s sex between any gender looks like I’m not afraid of sex or losing my virginity, it’s just like filmmaking for me, I know what’s the deal I’m just not interested.

Also that ace people have HSDD or that we must have experienced trauma… Hear me out, the only romantic experience I had was a success and the dude respected my decision to not have any kind of sex, I have never been in a sexually traumatic situation and honestly the aces that indeed have been in traumatic experiences have all the right to still feel ace, if on the contrary they wanted to regain their sexual desire and being ace was a problem, then of course they could seek help for that, but if you found an identity and you’re comfortable with it there’s nothing wrong in that!

Every behavior is all right until it hurts someone, while you’re not hurting yourself or others then you do you.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Take your time, no one’s rushing you. This is a personal decision and you don’t even have to make it, if you feel like you don’t need a label then don’t use any, if you find yourself more assured with one then slowly think about yourself, experiment, talk with close friends, search for a community and learn. Also if one day your feelings change don’t feel guilty with the community or yourself, sexuality is fluid and we should not feel pressured to maintain a label if we no longer feel comfortable with it.

Also don’t feel pressured to come out, as I said before I haven’t come out explicitly to many of my loved ones and I gathered a huge amount of courage to do this and expose myself as ace, coming out is your personal decision and you should do it, IF or WHEN you want to and feel safe to do so.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

This is the social media where you can find my works, you may find thing on IG that aren’t on FB and vice versa. Sorry if my English was wonky, it’s not my first language and thank you for reading until the end!!

FB: facebook.com/HanaFotografia
IG: instagram.com/tatiana.g_ph.

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Thank you, Tatiana, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Isa C.

Today we’re joined by Isa C. Isa is a phenomenal photographer from Costa Rica. She specializes in photographing people, exploring the stories that can be told through a person’s face. Her work is fascinating, showing a fantastic eye and an incredible amount of uniqueness. Isa is so passionate and dedicated, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well I’m a photographer from Costa Rica. I’m still learning, but always put out my best work. Currently I’m really into portraits, mainly because I’m interested by people and how much their faces can tell. I love exploring with different styles and get weird with it. I have the most fun when the shoots end up being confusing even to me.

The other part of my art is the editing, this is the part in which I spend most of the time. It’s a long process, but color grading and making things look magical is what I’ve come to love the most.

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What inspires you?

I find it incredibly hard to narrow down the things that inspire me. The more I think about it, the more sources of inspiration pop up in my head. I guess I’ve always been a person that spends more time inside her own head than anything else so, in a way, I inspire myself. I know that might sound a bit arrogant, but I’m not too sure it actually is.

The thing is, most of my ideas come out of, like, odd feelings that a song, melody or phrase may give me. I cling on to that emotion and freeze it in an image because otherwise, it’d be gone. Sometimes I end up shooting self-portraits out of sheer impulse, and the inspiration comes out of my need to constantly create.

On the other hand, my friend’s inspire me when I shoot them. Sometimes I star sessions with close to no premeditated ideas because I want to capture the essence of the person I’m shooting that specific day. So if they walk in with an air of curiosity, I’ll try to make that the theme. Same goes with any other emotion.

I guess, I get my inspiration out of the world I’ve built around myself, and use its unpredictable fluidity to my advantage.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My dad has always been a lover of the arts, not an artist at all though. I grew up in a house so completely covered in painting, drawings photos, and sculptures that it was weird to me when I went to other’s houses and they had close to non. As a consequence of his love of it, but lack of ability for it, I was enrolled in plastic arts classes at a very young age. As thing usually do, it evolved into different interests. I hovered all over the arts, but kinda just landed on photography when my dad bought me a point and shoot camera for me to use on a trip and I fell in love with it.

I don’t think so, probably still completely don’t. I like what my art communicates, and I hope to never stop creating, but I’ll always be a part time artist. My photos are part of me, but there’s other sides to me too.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not necessarily, but one thing I know is that every photo I put out is most definitely a product of my passion and something I am proud of. There must be tons of edited pictures in my hard drive that will never see the light of day.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Hustle, but with passion. There’s no way you’ll get anywhere if you don’t put in hours and hours of hard work, but if you stop loving what you do it’s not really worth it to me. I’m honestly still a young aspiring artist, so my best advice is to get yourself out there and kick some serious butt.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

That THE QUESTION. I’m not big on labels, that’s just my personal way of thinking. Why limit myself? It took me a long time to land on asexual, and even a longer time to acknowledge it as part of my identity.

I do like boys, girls and whatever falls in the middle. If I like you, I just do. Regardless of your gender.

When it comes to sex, I’m not repulsed by it, but instead have a certain aversion to it. I find pleasure in it, which is undeniable, but I never want to really do it with anyone. I acknowledge it feels good, I know I enjoy the feeling, I just don’t want to do it. It’s quite complicated to explain, but I do hope I’m making myself clear enough.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really, artists have a tendency to be open-minded. I’m really thankful for that. That being said, I’m somewhat of a private person. If it doesn’t come up, I will not mention it.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it means I hate sex, or won’t have sex. The fact that I am not sexually attracted to people doesn’t mean that I won’t do it, or won’t enjoy it, if the situation arises.

Another matter is that it’s some kind of defect. As if my aversion to is a reaction to trauma. No one touched me when I was little, no one forced me to do things I didn’t want to do… I just never felt that attraction.

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What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Take your time, there is no rush. No one gets to tell you who you are, but yourself. There’s no need to stress about it because regardless of who you mingle with, or don’t, is your own personal business. Labels give people comfort, but can also bring distress. If saying you are asexual makes you feel comfortable, then that’s all you really need.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is: itsleatherweather (but its personal so there’s a lot of random stuff aside from my photos)

My Instagram is: _isacastillo_ (purely my photography)

My Snapchat: isacastillo90 (I post behind the scenes of shoots and before and afters a lot. Plus, my life if you are interested. FYI I don’t add back people I don’t know.)

My Webpage: https://isacastillophoto.wixsite.com/photography (Includes my portfolio and contact info)

If you came from here and want to talk to me feel free to do so through any medium you find most comfortable! I love talking to fellow artists, and art lovers so don’t be shy!

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Thank you, Isa, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Mia

Today we’re joined by Mia, who also goes by Aljoscha online. Mia is a phenomenal photographer. They specialize in nature and architecture photography. Their work is brimming with life and an astonishing amount of detail. Mia truly captures snapshots of life and places with their gorgeous pictures. They are an incredibly talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Basically, I’m interested in any kind of art, because my family has an artistic disposition. I tried several things like drawing or making music but photography is the one field where I see my qualities. I do this as a hobby but I try to specify my work to nature and architecture photography.

I love to travel and I want to show other people what I have seen on my journeys. And of course photos are the best way to do this. 😀

What inspires you?

First of all, nature is a huge inspiration for me. It just offers the best subjects. Also cityscapes are incredible amazing. You just need to visit other towns and you see such a difference. It’s the diversity I want to capture and that gives me the inspiration to do my hobby.

Other huge inspirations are several photographers, e.g. Olaf Heine and Farin Urlaub. They both are in really different fields of photography but their works are impressing as heck. Their works give me a self-confidence boost à la “I can do this too!”

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

As I said I saw the works of Olaf Heine and Farin Urlaub and I wanted to do the same. First I thought I couldn’t do this because these people have a good qualification and worked in their field for years. I was nearly giving up when I saw that my brother autodidactically learned how to photograph and it turned out really well! This was the moment I got the self-confidence to also start photographing.

When I was a child, I was actually really annoyed that everyone in my family was so talented. I think it was because I am by far the youngest one and I wanted to be able to do all the art stuff my family did at the first go. I took me some time to realise that it takes time and patience and that you have to practice a lot. Now I’m happy with what I’ve already achieved and that I make people happy with my art.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I’m currently working on a signature. 😀

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Take your time! And don’t be sad if it doesn’t turn out well immediately. It’s hard work but in the end it was worth it, I promise. Also share your art everywhere you’re comfortable with. And always stay positive! When you see other peoples’ works don’t get sad – tell yourself you can do this too! Because you really can 🙂

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as polyromantic (sex- / touch-repulsed) asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Luckily not. When I’m taking photos / traveling I’m alone or with people who don’t know I’m ace — and that’s fine.

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Font de la Cascada

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception I heard about is that asexuals are broken and need to be “convinced” to have sex. People don’t seem to understand that you can be totally fine without having sex and that this is not bad.

And of course that asexuals wouldn’t belong to the LGBT+ community.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Keep calm. There’s nothing wrong with you and your identity.

Also make sure you have someone you can talk to – on the internet or in real life, doesn’t matter. If you’re sex-repulsed immediately tell your partner and talk about it. It’s important that they accept your boundaries and that you don’t push yourself into something you don’t want and / or you’re uncomfortable with. And don’t be afraid that you won’t find someone when you’re asexual! You’ll and so did I. It may be hard sometimes but life would be boring otherwise. 🙂

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

All my works are on DeviantArt: https://fdjpunx.deviantart.com/

Also I have a blog about photography where I post my works too: https://wuestenkind.tumblr.com/

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Strasse Bei Nacht

Thank you, Mia, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Mike Crawford

Today we’re joined by Mike Crawford. Mike is a wonderful visual artist from Scotland. He specializes in photography, but he also does a lot of drawing and painting. When he’s not creating visual art, Mike also writes poetry. It’s very clear he enjoys creating, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art is mostly figurative and realist, and includes such things as life drawing, still life, portraiture and landscape.

I identify as ace, but as yet this doesn’t really make an appearance in my art.

I have had long conversations with ace friends about what ‘Ace Art’ might actually be….whether it might be a political statement about our struggle, or whether there is actually some sort of intrinsic ‘Aceness’ that might be detectable in a person’s paintings.

And also there’s the whole question of ‘Ghetto Art’ i.e. ‘Gay Art’, ‘Black Art’, ‘Feminist Art’, ‘Queer Art’ etc. To me, those forms of expressions can be valuable politically, but I think they raise expectations in the minds of the potential audience, so for instance if I had an exhibition entitled ‘Queer Art’ which was made up of naturalistic landscapes, I can almost hear a viewer saying ‘Oh…this isn’t quite what I expected…’ …so the fact that I’m queer and I make art doesn’t perhaps automatically lead to ‘Queer Art’

So I guess I’m still pondering any ‘ace dimension’ that my work may or may not contain.

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What inspires you?

I’m inspired by the world around me, by places I visit and by people I meet.
I’m also inspired by the artists, poets and photographers I love.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Yes, from a very young age I was always drawing or colouring in.

In my teens, I was very fortunate to have an inspiring art tutor at school. He taught me how to use a grid pattern to scale up my vinyl album sleeves into posters, so I spent many happy hours in school copying photos of Bowie, Elton John, Roxy Music and Queen. People began to ask me if I could paint a design on their leather jacket or on a drum kit or the petrol tank of their motorbike and I became hooked on the incredibly social nature of art. I’m naturally shy, but art gave me a position within the group, in the same way as the class clown or sporty person… I was the arty one.

Later on, I went to some evening classes to study colour theory and then after I moved to Scotland to live at Faslane Peace Camp (a community which protests against nuclear weapons), I began to stop using photos and other people’s art as my references and to instead draw the people I was meeting and the landscape around me. This was very liberating as I discovered that I no longer needed to be copying other people’s ideas….that I could be original.

During my time at the Peace Camp, I also studied for a Foundation Art Course, which allowed me to build a portfolio of life drawings etc…and to then apply to Art School.

I then spent the next four years studying intently and have basically never stopped learning ever since.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I try to begin every artwork from scratch….from first principles if possible. One of the problems I’ve had with using galleries and agents is that they prefer you to be the guy or gal who paints cottages or stormy skies or clowns or whatever. If a painting sells, they want you paint another 20 exactly the same, because that’s how they make money. I don’t do that and I try never to repeat myself.

I don’t really have any recurring iconography in my work, except to say that I love to paint flowers. But no….not a unique symbol as such.

Many of my favourite artists very much DO have repeated objects and themes in their art and I love it….it just doesn’t happen for me in my own work, but if it works for you, I would absolutely encourage you to explore any and all personal symbolism.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

To always be your authentic self and to get as far away from any form of copying as possible. Try every possible medium you can. You might suck at oil on canvas, but be amazing at lino printing, so give everything a try. And also just have fun!

Something I used to teach my students;

Remember two simple things…’What do I want to say?’ and ‘How do I want to say it?’

…in other words, what do you wish your artwork to convey in terms of meaning, colours, politics etc, and also, which mediums will be best suited to tell your story? And of course as you continually revise your ideas, the mediums and methods can change too, so it’s a constant process…a journey rather than a destination.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Just plain old ace is fine for me, as I’m personally not the world’s biggest fan of the ‘spectrum’ concept.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Several years ago I was invited by some gay friends to take part in a local LGBT art exhibition. I submitted a painting, but it was returned to me by the organisers with a note to the effect that ‘asexuality has nothing to do with LGBT’ and that ‘there must be some confusion, so we are returning your artwork’.

In actual fact, what upset me the most was not the ignorance of the organisers, but the fact that several LGBT artists I know were happy to continue to submit work to the show without a word of protest about my poor treatment. That experience taught me a lot.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Most of the misconceptions and negativity seem to come from gay acquaintances, who will say stuff about asexuality being a medical problem caused by a hormone deficiency, or that ace relationships are not genuine or are ‘merely friendships’.

I’m not sure why straight friends have never said any of that stuff to me.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I would say that you are in a more fortunate position now than folk in my age bracket, who were struggling with their sexuality in a pre-internet, pre-google world.

I know it’s impossible to imagine now, but in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, there was literally no way to meet other aces, and no coherent way to explain to friends and family who you were as a person. Aces in their 50s and 60s often have failed relationships and marriages behind them, and years of suffering blindly, so I would say to young people ‘enjoy this amazing new community’

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

http://mikeyartwork.weebly.com/.

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Thank you, Mike, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Edea

Today we’re joined by Edea. Edea is a wonderful visual artist who is most passionate about photography. When she’s not out capturing the world in pictures, Edea also does a little visual art. She prefers working in digital media, but does dabble in traditional media as well. She’s an incredibly dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My primary art form is photography actually but I also enjoy drawing very much too. Where photography is more seriously performed (school, courses etc.) drawing is more of a hobby really. Both I do more in the digital field but I also once in a while use traditional ways of creating photos and illustrations.

I also write a little but not very well, it’s just never been as natural as for example drawing.

What inspires you?

Other people for the most part. Although, this depends on which one I’m doing. When I draw its mostly other people’s art that motivates me to draw myself. When it comes to photography it’s more likely that the moment I’m in inspires me to take the shot. I see something pleasing so I take a photo of it.

Also my family is a big motivator; all my siblings are very talented musically, one of them even artistically so they always make me strive for better art.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

To be honest I’ve always drawn but photography became a part of my life when I got depressed in high school. It was a way of releasing stress; beauty has always had a positive effect on me.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really, but I often use black and a vivid shade of red (blue) in my paintings. They are very recognizable – or at least that’s how I like to think about it-.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t let other people tell you that you can’t improve. Do you! Try things that seem difficult. Challenge yourself.

And please do not worry about likes/follows/reblogs. They are not that important, the main thing is that YOU are happy with what you’re doing.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a biromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, I don’t talk about it that much but when I do people mostly tell me how sad things must be for my boyfriend and that they couldn’t be with someone like me. Many have also told me to get “professional” help.

I’m bad at ignoring it but also too fed up to educate everyone on the issue. Mostly it gets to the point where I have to but sometimes people who have no will to even try to understand just make me so angry that I leave the matter be.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That one is somehow sick or that too immature and that’s why they identify as asexual . Often people also think that one is incapable of love.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If you have somebody that you can trust, then try to talk with them if you’re insecure or afraid. It might take some time that you yourself are comfortable with who you are so in the meantime try to make things as easy as possible. Just remember, you aren’t broken, there’s no need to ‘fix’ your sexuality.

It’s going to be okay.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

The most active I’m on Twitter, Patreon, and Instagram.

But you can also follow me on DeviantArt, YouTube, and pixiv.

Oh and Tumblr too! I’m always happy to talk with you about art and everything else so don’t hesitate to contact me!

sailromoon

Thank you, Edea, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Lisa

Today we’re joined by Lisa. Lisa is a phenomenal hobbyist who loves to draw and take pictures. Her photography is beautiful, showing everyday life and various scenes she comes across. For drawing, Lisa mostly does illustration. She works with both digital and traditional medium. Lisa is an incredibly enthusiastic artist with a creative soul, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

myself

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m someone with a lot of hobbies who takes some of them a tad too serious. First of all I draw a lot on paper and digitally but I’ve experimented with acrylics, watercolor, oil paint, clay and probably a lot more things. I tend to stay with illustration though, because, well, it’s in my comfort zone. And then there’s the photography thing. I try to take my camera anywhere I can and usually end up taking lots of photos, sometimes even with good result. I’m also mostly interested in street photography. I also enjoy learning about the technical aspects of optics and photography.

What inspires you?

For photography of course other photographers (on Flickr, Instagram etc.) but also the places I go to and the architecture of the city I’m visiting that day, although I don’t feel like I have the right lens for architectural photography though. (Lenses are insanely expensive, did you know that?)

As for my art, well, other artists of course! Following a bunch of artists (pros or not) has helped me grow a LOT. Also seeing art from my friends all the time motivated me because it made me want to improve.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I was in kindergarten and in class, minding my own business and enjoying myself with a coloring book when I overheard some girls say to each other that I was bad at coloring. I was so upset that from that day on I decided to practice drawing and I basically never stopped. (don’t worry though, I take criticism well these days) There was a period of a year or so that I was determined to go to art school as well, but my fear of financial instability eventually creeped in and I convinced myself to choose another career.

I only ever started photography when I decided to buy a DSLR because some of my high school friends had one at that time (it was also a trend I believe). But being extremely competitive by nature when it comes to these things, I wanted to make sure I was better at it than them so I learned about photography theory for two months before finally buying the camera. (I had some money saved up from my job, luckily)

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t think I have any to be honest!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep doing what you love and don’t beat yourself up over your mistakes. You will improve and learn new things your whole life which is something you should be excited about. Treat art like a lifelong adventure! 🙂

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m an asexual and that’s all I know. I guess I’ve had crushes on all kinds of people but I never wanted it to get serious. (commitment issues, probably? : ))

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well I wouldn’t know since most people don’t know. Or rather: I talked about it to some of my friends but some of them don’t seem to take it serious at all or don’t even believe it exist. I even have one friend who mocked me publicly a few times which was very painful. She is still very dear to me though, but it kind of made me wary. I’m not planning on ever speaking ‘irl’ about my asexuality again because I’m uncomfortable with it now. It’s just a tiny inconvenience in my life and we all have to live with those, right?

nge
NGE

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuality is just a medical issue that should be able to get fixed with the right treatment.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Take your time with it I guess! I’m still struggling with it myself so I wouldn’t know what else to say other than, well, there’s more people out there going through the same thing so you’re not alone!

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I post my photography (and sometimes some stupid sketches) on my Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lisnano/

yael
Yael

Thank you, Lisa, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.