Interview: Robyn Beecroft

Today we’re joined by Robyn Beecroft. Robyn is a phenomenal mystery author who writes a series that features an asexual sleuth named Haley. Their series is called the “Dancing Detective” series and they’re currently working on the 3rd book in the series. It’s clear they’re a dedicated and passionate author, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’ve just started writing cozy mystery novels. I’ve written fanfiction, romance and SF/F all my life, but I was intimidated by the thought of writing murder mystery because I thought it had to be as intricate as an Agatha Christie, and I didn’t think I had that level of complexity in me.

I didn’t realize that it’s easier when you’re writing the book, because you know what happens right from the start – all you as the author have to work out is how to hide the clues.

I have two books out so far in my Dancing Detective series, and I’m currently plotting the third one.

They feature two young sleuths who are trying to find their way in the world after leaving college. Rory, a posh and nervous gay man, and Haley a more down-to-earth asexual, non-binary person, solve murders deep in the English countryside while they grapple with the challenges of coming out and living their most authentic lives.

What inspires you?

I started writing these because I moved into the English countryside myself – just outside Cambridge – and got into folk music and morris dancing, which opened up a slightly bizarre whole new world to me.

I’ve always liked cozy mysteries, and I’d read a couple that featured morris dancing – and now I knew that their depiction of the culture was completely wrong, so I wanted to bring the fun and irreverence of the dance into my novels.

That inspired Murder of a Straw Man, after which I ended up putting all my favourite things into the series. Murder of a Working Ghost is about ghost tours of the city of Ely, and the one I’m working on now – Murder of a Starship Captain – is about science-fiction conventions.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer, yes. Ever since I can remember, escaping into a good book was one of life’s greatest joys, and I wanted to be able to give that to people.

I’m not too bothered about writing the next great American novel, but I just want to entertain my reader and give them a break from the monotony of real life.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t do anything like that knowingly. I’m always trying to make the next book different from the last. But probably things repeat without my knowing it. The subconscious is an amazing thing.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you want to write a book, just do it. Don’t wait for the right time, or tell yourself that you have to have a certain level of skill before you start. Start, and then don’t stop or deviate until you’ve finished.

It’s a lot easier to write a book if you know what it’s about and what you need to write in each chapter, so writing a plot-plan first will make things much simpler.

Sometimes your brain lies to you. You will get to a point with every book where you think “I hate this. It’s rubbish. I would literally rather clean the toilet than write this. It’s not working. I’m going to give up on this one and start something new.” DO NOT LISTEN. This is a lie. It is working. You’re just getting into the slump in the middle where writing is work rather than pleasure. Carry on writing it anyway. Do not stop until you get to the end.

As long as you push through and keep writing until you reach the end, you will eventually finish the book. If you start something new, you will end up having written for years with fifteen unfinished novels and nothing you can show to anyone. As Chuck Wendig says, “Finish your shit.”

Blank bookcover with clipping path

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m all the As – asexual, agender, sort of grey-romantic. To the extent that I have a romantic orientation, I’m androromantic, but I’m married and I’ve only been romantically attracted to one person for the past 25 years, so it doesn’t feel like a present and active factor in my life.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t encountered any in my field, but then I’m indie published, so my field tends to be me sitting in front of my PC.

I live in the countryside, which is about 20-30 years behind the rest of the world when it comes to understanding of queer sexualities, and I am not out to any of the people I socialize with. I listen to them talk and I know there would be so much ‘gender and sexuality 101’ to get through before they even understood what I was saying that it doesn’t feel worthwhile. My family know, which is enough.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

In my off-line life no one has even heard of it. I wear an asexual pin and sometimes someone will ask me what it’s for. At which point I’ll explain that it stands to reason that if you get people who are attracted to the ‘opposite’ gender and people who are attracted to the same, and people who are attracted to both, you must also get people who are attracted to neither – and that’s what asexuals are. Everyone I’ve got that far with has changed the subject at that point.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I would say, “It’s not a guarantee that you’ll be alone. If you want someone to share your life with, ace/allo pairings work just fine as long as you have respect for each other and consistent communication.”

I spent a long time – before I knew that asexuality was a thing – being depressed and guilty because I thought there was something wrong with me. Now that I know I was just asexual the whole time, my crops are watered, I have accepted myself and I am much, much happier in my life. I consider myself lucky to be ace. It is a nice, calm, peaceful thing to be.

I guess my advice would be, “try to accept yourself for who you are. Don’t be your own abuser. Telling yourself you shouldn’t be [whatever your sexuality is] never worked for anyone – it just makes you miserable. Why be miserable when you can be proud to be ace?”

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Well, I have a very sparse website here: http://robyn.beecroftbooks.com/

I have a Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/Robyn-Beecroft-Cozy-Mystery-Author-347680635791392

Facebook has purged my personal account and won’t let me back on that, so it’s the Page or nothing

I also have an Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/robynbeecroft/

Where I’ve started to put up pictures of the Fenland countryside in which the mysteries are set, and I mean to keep it for the sorts of things that Rory and Haley – my heroes – would enjoy.

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Thank you, Robyn, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jacob

Today we’re joined by Jacob, who is known on social media as Jacob’s Jottings. Jacob is a phenomenal author who writes both original fiction, nonfiction, and fanfiction. For nonfiction, he writes about autism and mental health for the site “The Mighty.” For fiction, he has mostly written fanfiction and original short stories, but has recently taken on two large projects. One involves a detective in post-war Britain and the other is about an autistic wizard (which is something i would absolutely love to read because it sounds fantastic). It’s clear he’s a dedicated and passionate writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. The Capitoline Academy (Sunset) (A4 cover logo)
The Capitoline Academy (Sunset)

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer, and I’ve really started to come out of my shell in the last few years. I’ve always written short stories and never shown them to anyone before, but that changed when my friends started writing fan-fiction, and my English teacher at college told me to attend a creative writing club.

Though I’m still very private about my larger projects, I started publishing articles for mental health site The Mighty, one of those articles received 32,000 hearts on the site, and got shared a lot on social media, so I started to say to myself ‘what if people would like my creative work too?’ and here I am now, writing two large scale projects, one about an autistic wizard, the other about a detective in post-war Britain. Not just that, but I published some fan-fiction of my own, and I found once that was out there, I found it a lot easier to write without much self-doubt.

I’ve recently finished college, and I’ve been accepted onto the Creative Writing BA course at a university I’ve dreamed about going to for years. I’m hoping this will really make my dream of being a full-time writer a reality, even if it takes years to take off.

As well as writing, I also do a bit of photography, and some digital design. I make all my own covers for my projects, as well as posters for events, and I love going out and taking pictures. I often use the pictures for reference for my writing, and it’s a great skill to have alongside.

What inspires you?

I find inspiration in many things, mainly everyday life. But I often find myself looking into what I loved as a child, certainly what comforted me. Sometimes this is in the form of stories by other authors, such as J. K Rowling, or Terry Pratchett, but other times its films and music, or most importantly to me: knowledge. Plants, animals, and space particularly always have heavy presence in my stories, and that’s because I love to learn new things.

I’ve always written to escape the real world, so I suppose it is natural that my other methods of escape blend well with this, I often find that going to a museum or exhibition particularly fuels my writing, it often ends in me trying to fit a lot into one box- my wizarding story contains as much knowledge of the natural world as it does fictional magic for example.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been creative, and I was sure I wanted to utilise that in some way, but could never find an exact form that suited me. I tried art, and drama, and found myself not ever truly comfortable. I mainly thank books, films, and television, for getting me into writing. The idea of making my own stories was irresistible! I cannot pinpoint when it exactly started happening, probably about five years ago, but I finally found that writing (alongside reading and watching) was the most enjoyable thing to do. Then it all fell into place, and I find myself writing all the time, even if it never gets added to again- it’s fun.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Oh definitely! The infinity symbol finds its way into most of the stuff I write, not just because of its use by the autistic rights movement, but because of my fascination with the concept behind the symbol. I also always incorporate types of birds as symbolism- usually owls, or penguins, as they’re my favourite, penguins especially.

Playing with colour is something I’ve recently moved into, I don’t have a single character that does not heavily associate themselves with colours and their meanings, even if it is just a subtle inclusion. Blue for my protagonists usually, a colour I use not only to create a cold atmosphere, but also to show the presence of intelligence, imagination, and peace. Reds and oranges meanwhile shows up my more passionate and instinctual characters, with purple showing a combination of the two.

I also love playing with imagery, with many of my characters having ‘hair the colour of fertile soil’ or the ‘great spurts of an ancient wine, hemorrhaging profusely’- it can feel a bit forced sometimes, but it often pays off, and I find it a great way of illustrating the worlds I’ve made.

I’m also told I tell stories in a unique way, my friend recently commented that when she reads my writing, I am clearly telling the story, rather than just creating it. I’ve never quite understood this evaluation, but I’ve heard it quite a few times in several forms.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It sounds cliché- but I would say just do whatever you love! I spent far too long worrying about what others think, and though that matters if you want to make a career out of it, the initial starting of a new art is a solo-activity. If painting makes you happy- paint! Everyone I know who does something creative for a living started off doing it to just kill time, or to help them with another activity, and it grew from there.

2. Inherited Intuition A4 Cover
Inherited Intuition

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I use the label asexual as standard, to me, this means not feeling sexual attraction. I’m confident in identifying as a sex positive asexual, but I’m yet to 100% settle on my romantic orientation.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I think one of the strangest encounters in my life was when I first explained asexuality to someone, without attaching the label to myself. I was told its ‘unnatural’- for this reason, in my private life, I don’t talk about my sexuality until prompted.

I also find that some in my age group is often sex-obsessed, I’ve often been labelled prudish just for not wanting to talk about sex, and I find it very hard to try and express my frustration with that. I am not at all prudish, I just think about it completely differently to they do!

I incorporate it into my work- I actually find it harder to write allosexual characters, and therefore many of my characters are asexual by accident! And I do worry that some people won’t understand the representation if they haven’t experienced it first-hand, but I do my best to write characters that educate as well as represent now.

Outside of my field, I see prejudice and ignorance regularly, insults such as ‘frigid’ and so on, I also see the constant discourse present on sites such as Tumblr, and though I do my best to keep out, I sometimes worry for our community, I hate the idea that anyone who identifies as asexual will feel like it isn’t valid or can’t talk about it in case they’re verbally attacked.

As an autistic person, I also find that some people think my asexuality is part of that. I don’t think it is- and it’s quite insulting to assume that someone’s sexuality is part of their sensory issues for example. The two often overlap for me, and I also know autistics that do feel sexual attraction and have those sensory issues anyway. Some people in both communities would even say their sensory difficulties enhance their sexual experiences.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Personally, I find that the definition of asexual is often mis-identified. It means lacking sexual attraction. But I know people who are completely convinced it simply means ‘won’t have sex, or won’t masturbate’- it is often a pain to try and debate it with them, and I find myself bringing up articles from the community to back my side up.

I don’t like discussing the personal details of my own asexuality in too much depth with people who might not understand, and therefore I think the extra labels of ‘sex positive’ are really useful when discussing asexuality, as well as the other identities within the spectrum.

At the end of the day though, the only person other than me who has a right to that deeper information is a partner, and I don’t think asexuals should ever feel pressured to dissect their identities for another person’s curiosity or because of an ignorant person’s misconceptions.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Firstly, it is okay to struggle! I found it incredibly hard to find the orientation that best described me. I still think sexual orientation is a fluid concept, and I think people who are struggling should remember that. If something doesn’t feel right, find the label that does feel right, and don’t feel guilty if that changes. Some asexuals might not find that identity for a long time.

I myself often find myself wondering if I might be aromantic as well as asexual, or demisexual instead of asexual, this is a natural part of development. Just as sexuality in all its forms is natural. A lot of people go through that internal debate. And nobody should ever be afraid of using the label that best suits them.

I would also repeat that the only person who needs to be happy is you. Come out at your own pace. Experience your sexuality at your own pace. Some people don’t find the identity they’re most comfortable with until they’re halfway through life, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

There’s a thriving asexual and LGBT+ community waiting to help you through it all, and the right people within it are not going to judge you for struggling.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

People can find my work in several places. For a more personal touch, there’s my own Tumblr blog which is at jacobs-jottings, or my AO3 under the same name (but without a hyphen).

As well as this there’s my new Facebook page, also called Jacob’s Jottings, and my user page on The Mighty, under my full name- Jacob Durn. If anyone is curious, my photography can be found easily on Instagram, where my username is identical to my AO3 one.

My blog has a bit of everything (including personal posts, and lots of reblogs), my AO3 some fanfiction, and soon some original works, whilst the last two focus on my non-creative work.

3. Murder On The Hogwarts Express
Murder On The Hogwarts Express

Thank you, Jacob, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: K O’Shea

Today we’re joined by K O’Shea. K is a wonderful writer who has completed a fascinating sounding graphic novel. Anytime someone mentions The Maltese Falcon, I perk right up (I’m a sucker for noir). K’s novel is entitled The Ghost Army of Atlantis and it’s currently being illustrated. It’s clear they’re very passionate about the project, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I currently have an unpublished but fully written graphic novel called The Ghost Army of Atlantis: A Millie Buckle, Ace Investigator Adventure. It is currently being drawn and colored by the artist, who is an equal partner on the project.

Millie Buckle was a project I began while I first was working out what being asexual meant to me, and is a reflection of what I always wanted in literature – awesome women, zero romance, and skeletons fighting ghosts in a two-page spread splash panel. Millie is a private investigator in the 1930s who often gets called for some of the weirder crimes – the elevator pitch is basically “What if The Maltese Falcon also summoned ghosts?”

I also write the occasional editorial and review on a website created by friends.

What inspires you?

A lot of my inspirations come from experiences or shared stories with my friends, but I do take a lot of influence from the books and movies I had growing up. There’s a little bit of Stephen King in me, but also some K.A. Applegate and Terry Pratchett.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Honestly, I always have ideas for stories, but I get the most excited when I get to share them with friends and family.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

That would probably be a good idea, huh? Probably my love of the semi-colon, which gets used far more than grammatically should be allowed.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to shove things back in the vault if it’s not working. You might get to it later when you’ve learned more. It’s okay to let yourself stop and move on to something else if you’re just not feeling it. If you force it, it’ll come out forced.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Sex-neutral, alloromantic, asexual. It’s never been that important to me as it has been for my partners – I get intimacy from emotional bonds and physical closeness.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not personally, but I’ve seen more published authors struggle with it.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That my marriage is not as valid as it otherwise would be. My spouse and I love each other, and sex doesn’t factor into it. We’re no less married than we were before I figured this out.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You’re not broken. You are absolutely not broken.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My reviews, editorials, and former podcast (I have since given it to my former cohost who continues to produce it) are at Made of Fail Productions (http://www.madeoffail.net). When Ghost Army is nearing artistic completion and ready for publishing, it will be there as well.

I’m also around at Twitter and Tumblr under the username osheamobile.

Thank you, K, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Oliver

Today we’re joined by Oliver. Oliver is a wonderful up and coming writer. They’re working toward publication and have written a fascinating sounding queer mystery novel. Oliver is admirably dedicated to the craft of writing, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write historical fiction mostly along with some fantasy. My current project is a queer mystery novel that is finished and under revision. It follows a detective’s faith in humanity as his professional and private life begin to unravel.

What inspires you?

I draw much of my inspiration the books that I enjoy reading and my own experiences. I grew up absolutely in love with the stories of Holmes, Poirot, Marple, and Dupin just to name a few. As I grew older, I started to look at these characters that I had adored so much and think about how much better they could have been if the traits that they and many others had been coded with were clearly written about. I wanted stories about diverse characters that were allowed to be imperfect and weren’t forced into awkward romances by their writers. While all of the detectives that had guided me through my childhood came the closest to that, there were still so many things that I would have changed about the stories. Finally, I realized that what I needed to do was just write my own stories the way that I wanted them to be told.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been writing since I was very young. It was mostly just short stories that I could fit on one sheet of paper. It was just a fun way to pass the time, but as I got older I began to realize that it was one of the few things that I was truly passionate. Because of that, I decided to go to college to study English and creative writing.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My work sounds dark, but I actually refuse to bury my gays or have sad endings. There’s just too much of that right now. I also write characters with established queer identities as opposed to coming out stories. Coming out stories were very important to me when I was starting to accept myself as being ace, gay, and nonbinary. Yet as I grew older, I found that what I wanted wasn’t stories based around accepting oneself and more things along the line of “You’re bi? Neat! I’m trans, she’s aro, let’s go on an adventure.” So that’s what I write.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Any kind of art takes practice. It doesn’t matter if you think you write silly stories, draw poorly, sing off key, etc. If you enjoy it, keep doing it. Eventually, you’ll come to realize that you’ve come a long way from where you started. Don’t give up on something you love just because you don’t think that you’re good at it. Putting art in the world is a beautiful thing whether you’re an artist that’s a household name or you just like making things for yourself.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual, still a bit unsure of where I fit romantically, but I’m in no rush to figure it out.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve been lucky that all of the beta readers that I’ve worked with have been very respectful of who I am and my choice to have ace and ace spectrum characters. Being ace isn’t something that people always understand, but there are also plenty of kind people who, while they may empathize, will still be positive, respectful, and supportive. If anybody tries to give me guff about my ace characters, they’re more than welcome to go read something else. Ace people deserve to see themselves well represented and I intend to add more books about ace people to the world.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The two misconceptions that I run into the most are that asexuality just doesn’t exist or that aces are all innocent and naive. I’m honestly not sure what to say about the first one other than that I’m concerned about how close minded those people must be. Given how many people have found and come to use the label of asexual in the past years, it’s clearly a thing. But being a trans person, I hear people talking about how that’s not a thing either so I guess if people don’t like something they just like to pretend it doesn’t exist. Ace stereotypes are difficult sometimes because I am a very stereotypical ace. I’m mentally ill, childish, introverted, etc. Even my friends who are very accepting of aces and have taken some time to read about the ace spectrum often associate being ace with the stereotypical traits about it and that’s highly frustrating. There’s so many aces who don’t fit that model and if we view asexuality in one dimension it just makes it even more difficult for aces who don’t fit the stereotypes to come to accept themselves.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay to take your time. Not having an exact word or words for who you are is absolutely fine. What matters is that you’re comfortable. If that means that you want to call yourself asexual even if you’re not totally sure if that label works for you, go for it. If it means that you think you’re asexual but don’t want to call yourself ace or be out, go for it. No matter what, you’re not alone and who you are is natural, good, and wonderful.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

To be honest, it’s probably going to be quite a while before I publish anything. I have a short story with an aro ace protagonist on my aro ace Tumblr (at aroacepositivityplace) along with some artwork of ace headcanons on my art Tumblr (at olihaspencils). Messages on either blog are always welcome. I love talking about all things ace with people. Once I get published, I probably will create a Tumblr specific to my books.

Thank you, Oliver, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Maxine Janerka

Today we’re joined by Maxine Janerka. Maxine is a wonderful author who currently has one novel out, the first in a series, which features an ace main character. Maxine is definitely a writer and it clearly shows: she simply can’t stop writing (which is a good thing, because we always need more ace authors). Aside from her original work, Maxine also writes a ton of fanfiction. Like I said: definitely a writer 🙂 My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

DESSERTS_two

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write! I write a slightly ridiculous amount, because it’s both something I love and my job. In terms of things I publish, I write mystery and fantasy books– I only have one out right now, but it’s the first in a series and I have completed drafts through book four in that series, as well as two unrelated standalone books. And the fanfic– can’t forget the piles upon piles of fanfic.

What inspires you?

Sometimes I see a piece of media and I think I can write the same plot only better, so that’s what I end up doing. That may make most of my stuff glorified fanwork, honestly, but everything is a fanwork of something on some level, right? Right.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I always told and made up stories, ever since I was little. The transition from talking my mom’s ear off to writing things down was a bit rough, but I’ve pretty much done something like this all my life.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t think I have anything like that, but I may just be unaware of it. Though, entirely too many of my characters have yellow eyes, if that counts, and I’m sure I have my four or five favorite character tropes that crop up more often than they ought to.  

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you enjoy doing An Art(tm), keep on doing it even if you think you suck. I’m not going to say you don’t suck, because at some point we all suck, but the only way to suck less is to keep doing the thing. I’ll use myself as an example, I suppose.

I found a story I wrote when I was in 7th grade, and let me tell you– the plot is ridiculous, the characters are flat, the prose is purple, the foreshadowing feels like blunt force trauma to the cranium, and I’d saddled my poor protagonist with the name Zane Ravencroft. It’s awful. It’s also where I learned to work with multiple viewpoints, developed multiple female characters with distinct personalities, practiced my world-building, and researched armor and shipbuilding in the Middle Ages. I literally would not be able to write what I write now without having written that. It still sucks, like, objectively, but the fact that I wrote it taught me so much.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m aro-ace, which is to say that I don’t experience (or at least, haven’t experienced) romantic or sexual attraction.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not… really? Ignorance more than prejudice, I suppose. People assume I have a boyfriend (or a girlfriend) or something like that. It doesn’t come up much, except maybe when people suggest my stories would benefit from a dash more romance and the like.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

… I do not actually photosynthesize, despite having had green hair for a while. Jokes aside, it really seems like most of the people I encounter don’t know what asexuality is, and thus don’t have any thoughts about it at all, right or wrong.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I don’t think I have any place giving this sort of advice, honestly, because I haven’t really struggled with anything orientation-wise. I had a smooth and rather boring ride of it, actually. I guess what I can say is that no matter how alone you may feel, there are other people just like you out there, and there’s a high probability that you’ll meet them, either in-person or online, because there really is a lot of us out there.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have a Tumblr! You guys should all come talk to me at 23murasaki.tumblr.com. Or find me on Facebook either under my name or the book page facebook.com/linnanyxmysteries

Thank you, Maxine, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.