Interview: Wolfie

Today we’re joined by Wolfie. Wolfie is a phenomenal makeup artist who uses makeup to create extraordinary looks. She has done a number of different things with makeup, from standard beauty to more fantasy and horror related looks. She has also done special FX makeup. Aside from makeup, Wolfie also dabbles in a couple other mediums as well. She’s a passionate and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

One of the things I do is makeup and special FX. Be it beauty, fantasy or horror. I mostly do whatever has caught my fancy that day or week. I have done photoshoots, short films and even a wedding or two with my makeup.

Which plays into my other mediums, such as drawing and painting. I have a ton of sketch books filled with art, some I give away and the same with my paintings.

Along with costuming which has been trial and error. As for my leather working I am still a beginner, which I was learning from my aunt and now my dad. Also have been dabbling into jewelry making.

What inspires you?

When I was a kid, fantasy (books, art etc.) and music played in a big part in my creativity.

Along with a rich family heritage that led to being a Pagan Witch, lets me see the beauty in magic and life that goes into my art.

My Aunt also who is deceased now, was also a big inspiration to me.

Being a writer and creative person herself, part of the LGBTQ+ community and Pagan, she always encouraged me to not give up and to pursue what I love.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Ever since I was little girl, I was always drawing and then moving onto other things as I got older. Heck, I even wanted to be a manga artist at some point!

As for my makeup and special FX, I give that one to my family. We have always been big on Halloween and doing creative costumes, which led to me eventually finding conventions in my late teens. It would also be my early 20’s to mid-20’s that I would go to makeup school for it.

Which I am always learning new and creative ways to improve.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Mostly just my name and other account names I would hid in it, or just smack dab where you can see it.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just go for it. Self-doubt will happen where you think you art, or you’re not good enough.

But it will be, maybe not in your eyes.

But others will love your art even if you think they don’t.

Never compare yourself to another, each of us is unique and different. We go at our own pace and our artistic journey happen sometimes now or a little bit later.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a proud Asexual Pan romantic 29 year old.

In my early 20’s I thought I was just Pansexual, but that didn’t seem right to me.

It wasn’t until my mid 20’s that talking with a friend, that they said “Uh Wolf, I think you may be Ace.”

So I looked it up and it started making more sense to me. While giving me a feeling of relief that I wasn’t “broken”.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Oh boy, in my makeup field I have, since it slipped out one time during class.

And mostly I just educated them, while being calm about it and maybe a ‘wee’ bit of Sass when they asked a personal/ignorant question. But mostly, I just refuse to apologize anymore for being who I am.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“Well, how can you be in a relationship if you don’t have sex?” Is probably the most common thing I get.

Again I just calmly answers/educate, or (at times) Sass back with a witty clap back that makes them go “Oh! I see! Sorry about that.”

But it is also just standing my ground and not letting other tell me “oh but you just haven’t met-”

“Or have you seen a doctor?” etc.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It may seem you’re alone and others tell you that you are broken, but you are not.

Don’t let anyone tell you differently, this is your journey of discovery and your identity is real.

For your community sees you and you are loved, valid in your right to not be silenced or harmed as you keep learning who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Instagram which I welcome anyone to join me! wolfie_shieldmaidenswitch

Deviantart: Moonlightwolfos

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Thank you, Wolfie, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Ellie

Today we’re joined by Ellie. Ellie is an exciting first for Asexual Artists: she has her own homemade makeup brand. She has mostly lipsticks and highlights and specializes in overdramatic colors. The colors she uses are just gorgeous and made to stand out. She’s a very talented and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

So my art is Ellips (or EllipsCosmetics) on Etsy. It’s a homemade makeup brand, where I currently make and sell lipstick and highlight, mostly in overdramatic colours.

What inspires you?

(This is the longest answer, but it’s also my answer to half of the next question as well) So the backstory of setting up my brand was an adventure and a half. I remember the dates and everything, so buckle up for a long and potentially very dull story. On the 25th of January, little 15 year old me was off school with the flu. She was on a video call with some of her Internet friends, when one of them played a couple of Adam Lambert videos. This lead to me basically spending the following week stalking Adam Lambert, and discovering his makeup artist, Sutan, better known by his drag persona, Raja Gemini. Now, bear in mind that this was the find time I had shown any interest in makeup. Drag queens are usually men, and they aren’t aiming to look like normal women, but I wanted to be as wonderful and otherworldly as these beautiful creatures. Now, if you haven’t caught on to why this ties in yet, consider this – drag queens don’t necessarily wear the kind of makeup that a poorly 15 year old can afford – you couldn’t buy blue lipsticks for less that $18 (and this was only because Jeffree Star made some for that price. Otherwise, there was nothing). Being from the UK, $18 ended up being more like £25, which I certainly couldn’t afford. So I made some instead. Simple as (well, almost, but you don’t need to hear about the amounts of research I did), and I was only planning on making a single blue and a single green lipstick, but the benefit of internet friends is that they can be really encouraging. I basically got asked by a bunch of people if I would make them one for they to buy from me, so I made them better, and set up my Etsy shop after about nine months. My shop is my baby, and the things that inspired me to start it, inspires me still, and I let a lot of LGBT history and present events inspire what I do as well. I let myself be inspired by the world, because you never know what’s around the corner.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I basically answered this in my previous answer, so all I really have to add is that I’ve never been a creative person. I write sometimes, but throughout my life up until this brand that was the only creative outlet I had. I never had any interest in being an artist – this basically all came about from a string of unlikely circumstances.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really. I don’t let anything act as a barrier – I’m at college as well taking very time-consuming subjects (maths, economics, and English lit) – but I work around that. I try and make every section of the brand that I can do  – I print my own labels and everything, which is a little bit of a nightmare, and I try to be slightly more eco-friendly – almost all of my packaging is reused, but that’s more of wanting to be eco-friend than being unique.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Do what you do for yourself. Other people will like what you do, but they don’t matter. It’s most important that you love what you do, because otherwise you’re doing it for nothing and it will drain you. Don’t be afraid to take time out if you need it. Look after yourself and love yourself first.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I thought I was aro ace, but I’ve been told that what I feel towards a girl at college is a crush, so possibly ace lesbian? Or grey-aro ace? I’m not really sure at the moment, but I’m okay with that (mostly)

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Running my brand is quite separate to other people, so I have next to no contact with other people in my field, and even then I’m not really out to them about being ace (because no situation so far has called for me to be).

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That you’ll want to have sex when you meet the right person, and that there will be a right person. It’s completely fine to be single, and you are in no way required to be in a relationship, no matter what other people tell you. I also get ‘you won’t be saying that once you’ve tried it’, like, I’m sex-repulsed, I’d really rather not.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

First and foremost, accept yourself, no matter what sexuality. You’re sexuality is part of who you are, but it’s not your entire being. If you are struggling with the idea of being asexual, that’s fine. What you’re feeling is real and valid, but it can also be scary figuring it out, and that is completely okay. Take your time. And if you think your sexuality has changed from what it was, that’s also completely fine. You are a living breathing person, you may not always fit in the same box, and you will be loved no matter what your sexuality is.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/EllipsCosmetics or search EllipsCosmetics (or just Ellips) on Etsy. If you want to talk to me about anything related to my brand, email me at ellipscosmetics@gmail.com.

Thank you, Ellie, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Emma

Today we’re joined by Emma. Emma is a phenomenal and versatile artist who hasn’t met a medium she doesn’t like. She does a lot of writing, fiction and poetry. When she’s not writing, she enjoys working with makeup. She has an enormous amount of passion for what she does and that makes for a great interview, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I dabble in many things! Fiction writing, knitting, photography, but two that stick out the most are poetry/song writing and makeup.  I love smearing things on my face and becoming the art or weaving words into something that someone will love to listen to.

What inspires you?

Nature does.  I love incorporating the color of the leaves into a beautiful eyeshadow look or put them into words on a page.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always had a knack for putting some words onto paper, and all the reading I did as a kit really helped with that.  As for cosmetics, one day my mom gave me a bag of all her old makeup to play with, and thus my obsession started,

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My style generally fluctuates, it’s not consistent enough for me to have a signature style.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Write, even if you hate what you put on your face.  Keep doing makeup, even if your eyeliner is uneven every time.  Keep taking pictures when they’re blurry.  When you finally take that perfect photo or your eyeshadow is blended to perfection, it makes all the practice worth it.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual and aromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

My sexuality is something that I try to avoid talking about when it comes to art.  We should focus on the art, not my sexuality.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“Isn’t that what plants do?” –An uninformed person.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If you don’t want to, you don’t have to have a label.  You can be unabashedly you and not take anything from anyone when they tell you otherwise.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Sometime before the end of 2016, I’ll have released a zine with many other amazing arospec people called “Don’t Talk to Me of Love”.  It’s a collection of poetry, and our first issue focuses on aromantic themes.  Also, in the next year or so, I hope to complete a few songs that I have written throughout the past year and let everyone hear them!  If or when that happens, I’ll be sure to let my followers know on my main blog, short-hair- -don’t-care.

Thank you, Emma, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Celestiial Cosplay

Today we’re joined by Celestiial Cosplay.  Celestiial was one of the amazing aces I met at Cincinnati Comic Expo.  She is an amazingly talented cosplayer and quite a bright personality.  Her cosplays are absolutely gorgeous and I am ridiculously happy to be able to feature her on this blog.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’ve been cosplaying since June of 2010. Since then, I’ve learned to sew. I’ve learned how to apply makeup for different colors and styles of hair. I’ve learned what passion feels like. And I’ve learned how creative and unique the cosplay community can be. I’ve been a princess and a Pokemon. I’ve been a vampire and Mama Monster. My art is becoming someone new and learning something amazing.

What inspires you?

When I first started this, I didn’t really have inspiration. It was something fun to do a couple of times a year. However, once I really dedicated myself to cosplay, when it changed from hobby to identity, my inspiration came from the friends I made at conventions. It was a way to bond with people that lived hours and states away from me. Then once I started making a public name for myself, what inspired me shifted to being able to inspire others. I’ve been a source of advice for total strangers. Some of them ask me to simply be an ear for their problems. Some of them started cosplaying because of me and thank me for giving them confidence. So today, my inspiration is being able to improve the world a little bit in my own way.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a performer. From choir, to theater, to marching band, having an audience was my niche. When I was invited to my first convention, I knew I couldn’t attend in my street clothes — it was too big an opportunity to miss. And I’ve never looked back.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nothing visible, but any character I cosplay is one that I can relate to in some big way. I have to really be attracted to a character to feel comfortable dressing as them.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Start small and do what you can do right now. Don’t get intimidated by what someone else can make — instead, use that as your own inspiration, as something that you can do someday. Practice and learning is everything.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m demi-panromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

None that was directly influenced by my field, but I’ve certainly dealt with individuals, both within the cosplay community and within my personal life, that are either ignorant, intolerant or both. Ideally, someone who doesn’t understand asexuality is willing to learn about it. Too often this doesn’t happen and I’ve had people (including my own parents) try to argue with me, or convince me that this isn’t how I am, or to say that I just haven’t met the right person, or any other cliché you’d like to apply. It’s frustrating, but I’ve learned that my comfort is the most important factor. If someone chooses not to accept me for whatever reason, I distance myself from them. My life’s been a lot simpler once I employed that strategy, and I’m much happier.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common one I’ve had thrown out at me specifically is that since I’ve only had sex with one person, I can’t possibly know that I don’t experience sexual attraction. Usually, these people meet the fate described above. I don’t need that crap.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Please don’t doubt yourself. I didn’t know asexuality was an option. I didn’t know it existed. You’re either gay or straight, or bi if you’re experimenting in college—this was the stigma I grew up with. It’s wrong. It’s so wrong. When I learned there was a word that described me, that the way I felt was a real thing and acknowledge (however sparingly) it changed everything. I thought back to things from my childhood that now made perfect sense. I was happier. If you learn something you want to embrace, whether it’s your orientation, or religion, or lifestyle, DO IT. You don’t have to commit to it for the rest of your life, so if it works for you right now, please embrace it as hard as you can. Own it. Love yourself. You might change, and that’s okay. You might not, and that’s okay. If you want to choose a label, that’s no one’s business but yours.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Facebook page is probably the best place: www.facebook.com/celestiialcosplay

Aside from that,

Instagram: celestiially
Tumblr: celestiially
YouTube: celestiial cosplay
Storenvy: celestiial cosplay
Email: celestiialcosplay@yahoo.com

I always answer all messages and emails, so feel free to contact me any way you like!

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Thank you, Celestiial, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Conner Quinn

Today we’re joined by Conner Quinn.  Conner is an exciting first for Asexual Artists:  he’s a makeup artist.  The human body is Conner’s canvas and he’s an incredibly talented painter.  The pictures he sent are absolutely remarkable as you’ll soon see.  My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do makeup and body paint on myself and others, occasionally for cosplay and conventions.  I do face painting for parties and such, also, usually around Halloween.  I don’t have much money to buy makeup, so friends give me gifts for my birthday and other holidays, but I mostly work with what I have and make it work.  It’s fun to use the bone structures and curves of a body or face to create works of art.  People are my blank canvases just waiting to be made into my own art.

What inspires you?

The contours and structures of bodies are usually where I start.  I love eyes, especially.  Otherwise, I’ll get my inspiration from video games like We Happy Few or a TV show or book.  Lately, a lot of my inspiration has been coming from a podcast called Welcome to Night Vale because there are no character descriptions and it is very mysterious and intriguing, giving the artist the freedom of whatever they think the characters may look like.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

A few years ago I stumbled on a YouTube channel called MadeULook by a girl named Lex, a professional makeup artist and body painter from Chicago.  I thought it looked like lots of fun and wanted to try it out for myself, letting myself do whatever my hands would create.  I am also an illustrator, write music, write stories, play instruments, and sing, so those were my main art forms before I found the world of makeup.  I’ve always been pretty creative.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

No, not really.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t get down when you’re having a creative block, no matter how long it lasts.  You’ll find your inspiration again and get right back up.  You’re still an artist and your brain needs time to rest sometimes.  Don’t get down on yourself.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a panromantic asexual.  Also, gender fluid if that matters.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

My friends and fans are very accepting, if anything it’s my parents that disrespect me for who I am.  I usually just brush it off and keep going, I’ve got enough on my shoulders between finishing high school, dealing with gender discrimination, and applying to colleges.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Usually when I tell people I’m ace their reaction is “really?  But you’ve dated people before!”  Asexuality has nothing to do with my romantic interests, thank you very much.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Hey, you do you, I’ll do me, and we won’t do each other.

But seriously, if you’re struggling with your orientation and are unsure, you don’t have to identify as anything until you’re sure!  It’s also just fine to change your orientation as you see fit.  As someone who changed their gender identity every month for a year and a half, changing what you identify as is just fine and if people don’t respect you then they’re not worth your time.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’ll start updating my makeup and cosplay Tumblr and Instagram more once I get back into the routine of the school year.  My Tumblr is rainbowdragons13 and my Instagram is snow.dragons.  I’m always open for asks or DM’s!  I’m a fairly open person and do photo editing if anyone who cosplays or just wants an edit ever needs that.

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Thank you, Conner, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.