Interview: Faith

Today we’re joined by Faith. Faith is a wonderful artist who does a bit of everything. She paints, writes, sings, plays instruments, and draws. She’s most passionate about dancing. Faith loves to dance. It’s clear she’s a passionate and talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do a large variety of different art forms such as dance, singing, acting, instruments, drawing, painting, and more. I think the one that I’ve focused on the most would be dance. Dance has been one of those things that I started super young, 5 years old, and I have continued to do for so many years. It is like a safe haven for me. It is a way for me to let go of the world around me and just let my emotions out. I honestly can’t imagine my life without it.

What inspires you?

Nature and emotions inspire me mostly. I guess some combination of the two. I always feel so at peace outside in nature, as cheesy as it sounds, watching a cloud roll by or the rays of the sun through the trees. A lot of my movement comes from watching a river flow or a leaf caught in the wind. Surprisingly or not so surprisingly rain and puddles are where I find some of my most interesting ideas. Nature is never stagnate, and there is a lot to be found in the ever changing world.

As for emotions, there are such hidden depths to every single person out there. The raw emotions people don’t normally see are such an interesting thing to experience or choreograph with. Music choice works extremely well with this too, as music is supposed to evoke feelings. A slow dramatic piece could work with feelings of longing or sorrow while an uplifting song could focus on joy or peace.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Kind of embarrassing but the Barbie movie the Nutcracker is what got me started dancing. I realize now that the dancing on there is very bad but hey, I was 5. At the time I thought it was the best thing I had ever seen and I have been hooked on art ever since. This obviously snowballed into so many different types of arts like music, visual, performing, to the point of I can’t imagine my life without art. It is so integral to who I am that I have never imagined being anything other than an artist.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t have one specific thing that occurs in all of my dances. I guess one of the most common things that occurs would be using music from movie, TV, or video game soundtracks but I wouldn’t really call that a unique signature. I’m just a huge geek!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t let anyone bring you down. You don’t become a prima ballerina overnight and you will fall down. Nobody is perfect and we have to accept that. One of the biggest things I see when people start dancing is being constantly being discouraged by corrections or criticism. The best thing you can do is take the corrections and learn from them. You will grow as a dancer, an artist, and a person. You have to remember that everyone started where you are now, and they used hard work and dedication to achieve their dreams. “Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass. It’s about learning to dance in the rain.”

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I believe I am asexual and heteroromantic. I’m not entirely sure about the romantic side of me, I may be demiromantic, but I am definitely positive that I am asexual. I haven’t been in many situations where I can explore my sexuality further but that may just be because I generally avoid situations where people can give me romantic interest.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t really found that much prejudice is my field mainly because it is rarely talked about. That and most people I talk to don’t really know that much about asexuality. The main issue I have found is just the heteronormality and hypersexualized nature in the world. There are many dances that I have been in where the dance is fun until the choreographer decides to add in a sexualized section in order to draw the crowd in. It makes me uncomfortable to watch or perform and it is normally unnecessary.

I will say that where I perform, homosexual relationships are represented and choreographed which is quite refreshing. But there is no asexual representation.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That either we don’t exist or that people automatically assume that asexual people are all sex repulsed. I know that many of us don’t want sex, don’t like sex, or are even repulsed by it but there is a large amount of us who don’t mind sex. I don’t know where I fall on the whole sex spectrum but I do have an asexual friend who rants to me about the topic. She says that she enjoys the act of sex even if she isn’t sexually attracted to someone.

I guess another misconception that I have seen is that people would think that asexuality is just a low sex drive. An imbalance in chemicals. That it can be “fixed.” Asexuality is an orientation just like any other sexuality. There is nothing wrong with it nor is there anything wrong with an asexual person.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Have a good support system. One of the things that has helped me the most with my sexuality would be having people who understand and respect me. It has helped cure my insecurities and accept who I am.

Just remember that you are not alone. There are so many of us out there in the world who have been exactly where you are now. You are not broken. You are not weird or wrong or even a freak. There are people out there that can support you and that do accept you. There is more love for asexuals than hate. Focus on that.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I don’t post a lot of my work online but I do have some on my Instagram account. It is a private account so if you want to see anything just DM me and tell me you saw this post and I’ll let you follow me! At kitten0981.

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Thank you, Faith, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Brian

Today we’re joined by Brian, who also goes by Adipsia. Brian is a phenomenal musician who plays with multiple bands. He also makes ambient music on his own. He uses synths and field recordings to create slow meditational music. It’s very clear that he has an enormous amount of passion, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I compose experimental ambient music under the Moniker Adipsia! It’s slow, meditational music made with synths and field recordings, and occasionally percussion and other random instruments. I explore themes a lot with my music, and most of my releases have been concept albums that tell a larger story. But it’s mostly instrumental, so you can glean whatever meaning you want from it.

What inspires you?

Almost everything! I manage to find inspiration just about everywhere; sitting in a restaurant listening to silverware and the din of the other people, taking a walk and hearing the sounds of the city mixing with the birds in the trees, or just watching an interesting movie or reading a book. Since the art I make is very nebulous and open, ideas can spring forth out of just about anywhere. Listening to other really talented musicians also gets my mind working, it’s fun to dismantle the elements of their music and guess their creative process.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

It was probably my parents; neither of them are very musical, but they got me involved in music since I was 6 years old. I’ve always been very creative, and my parents, even though I grew up poor, really tried to provide good outlets for my creativity. I don’t think as a child I ever really thought about what I wanted to be when I grew up, other than an X-Wing pilot, haha. But music has been a large part of my life for so long, it just feels natural to be doing it.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I guess there is a very echo-y delayed electric piano patch that I throw in quite a few songs. It’s usually in the background, and it fills up a lot of space in a delicate fun way, so I end up utilizing it a lot. Other than that, I don’t really think there’s any kind of signature to my music, other than it all being pretty chill music.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

My recommendation is to ingest as much art as you can. Find artists you enjoy, and just take in their work and really listen/look closely. Find out what you enjoy about their work, what you don’t like, and what you’d do differently. Then go do it!

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Heteroromantic Asexual. I’m married, and there was some rocky patches to get over during our relationship, but she’s very accepting of my sexuality.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not too much, I don’t really talk that much about sex outside of close relationships, so it doesn’t come up that often. If I ever do mention it, I either get approval and understanding, or I have to explain what it is.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s just low libido, and that it can be fixed with testosterone treatment. I do have a low libido, but I can recognize it as something separate from sexual attraction.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I would say ‘own it!’ There’s no reason to be ashamed of who you are. Your sexuality is a small part of your whole being, and it’s part of what makes you a unique individual.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

If you want to check out my work, you can find it on Bandcamp, (adipsia.bandcamp.com) where I release my full albums, and on my Soundcloud (soundcloud.com/adipsiasa) where I usually post little demos, meditations, and things I’ve been working on recently. Of course there’s Facebook too, but I am really bad at social media, so I end up not posting for weeks at a time.

Thank you, Brian, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Sage

Today we’re joined by Sage. Sage is a young, up and coming pianist who lives for music. They have done a bit of everything: choir, composing, playing multiple musical instruments. It’s very clear that they absolutely love music and has a very bright future ahead of them. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a 14-year-old musician and I compose for and play piano. I also play guitar and ukulele, and I sing in a choir at my school. I’ve been playing piano for about 4 years. I mostly play classical music on the piano and I take Royal Conservatory of Music exams (I’m in grade six), and I also enjoy doing covers of various songs. As for my compositions, they are in a variety of different styles and genres, but I compose in minor keys mostly, although I’m not entirely sure why.

What inspires you?

Literally anything. Sometimes nature, sometimes art, sometimes people. My piano teacher is a composer as well, so he often gives me tips and pointers on composition. I would say that he inspires me too.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was little, there was always a piano in my house and I would play songs by ear. My mom played piano and I really looked up to her. I was constantly asking for lessons, and when I was 10, I was finally got my wish. My dad played violin and my cousin played guitar, so I guess I grew up surrounded by music. Seeing the people around me play music sparked my own interest. I’ve always wanted to be an artist, but when I was younger, before I started playing piano, I was interested in drawing. It was only when I started taking piano lessons when I realized that music was my passion.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really, except that 99% of my compositions are in a minor key XD

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I would tell them to try everything because there are so many different types of art. Also that they shouldn’t give up if something doesn’t work out or if they don’t like something immediately.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual and aromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t encountered any ace prejudice, because I’m not out for the most part. All of the musicians I’ve come out to (which is like four) took it well and said that the fact that I’m ace and aro doesn’t change the fact that I’m a musician.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t like anyone, we’re heartless, or we can’t love. This is absolutely wrong. We’re definitely not heartless, and we definitely can love. Being asexual doesn’t mean being aromantic, and even if someone is ace and aro (like me) we still love our families and love people platonically.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I would say that they shouldn’t worry if they can’t find a label that fits them, or if they don’t feel like they belong in the ace community, or if people don’t accept them. They know who they are deep down, and if it takes a while to find a label, or if they can’t find a label, that’s fine. Sometimes it’s a good thing to go without a label for a while. I would also say that they shouldn’t cling too tightly to labels, because there may be a better label for them that they would miss if they clung to their current label too tightly.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Currently, nowhere. I’m going to get a Sound Cloud account, but I don’t have one right now. I occasionally post music stuff on my Tumblr (programming-ace) so I guess people could look there.

Thank you, Sage, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.