Interview: Kit

Today we’re joined by Kit. Kit is a wonderful writer who writes a bit of everything. She writes a lot of speculative fiction with queer characters and aspires to be published one day. When she’s not writing, Kit enjoys fanart and dabbles in cosplay. She’s got an incredible love of her craft, as you’ll read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I write speculative fiction of just about every kind you can think of — high fantasy, urban/contemporary fantasy, occasionally sci-fi or Twilight Zone-style horror — with plenty of queer characters. I have been known to write the occasional fanfiction, and I cosplay as well! I love making cheap/DIY and “closet” cosplays. In this picture I’m playing DC’s John Constantine, with an embarrassingly bad temporary dye job.

What inspires you?

Everything. I’ve gotten sparks of inspiration from everything from my own day-to-day life, to History Channel documentaries and Wikipedia rabbit holes, to binge-watching Shadowhunters. I believe in actively seeking inspiration from the world around me, because it really has so much to offer!

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve known I wanted to be a writer since I started reading, which was at the age of 3. It took a little longer before I learned how to write, but in the meantime I made stories with crayon drawings and Little People dolls. I’ve always been a storyteller.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

All of my main characters have some kind of physical scar or injury. I’m a self-harm survivor, so showing characters with scars that they don’t hide, that they consider part of their story, is really important to me.

Also, this is more of a recurring theme, but I love writing “roguish” characters — “outlaws with hearts of gold,” as the saying goes. Characters whose hearts and intentions (and hair) are good, even if sometimes they do bad things. I’m a sucker for guys/gals/NB pals like that.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just go for it. Seriously. You will think, “Oh, I’m not good enough,” “Oh, no one’s going to read this/like this,” “I’m just going to get rejected,” etc, but don’t listen to that. Yes, you’re going to write stuff that isn’t good, you’re going to write stuff that no one likes, you’re going to get rejected, but you’ll also write stories that people love. That will make it worth it, believe me, and you’ll never get there if you don’t JUST START.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as demisexual (I go back and forth between that and greysexual, I’m still questioning, but for now I think demisexual fits best) and bi-romantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I wouldn’t consider it prejudice, or even ignorance, but there is a very pervasive, and kinda frustrating, idea in modern publishing (especially YA) that a story isn’t ~interesting enough~ without romance, and the sexier the romance the better. I think it’s important for both ace and allo readers to see that, first, you can have a perfectly good story with no romance, and second, you can have a perfectly good romance with no sex!

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

A surprising number of people — including my parents! — don’t really “buy” that I don’t experience sexual feelings (or, more accurately, don’t experience them outside of people I already have romantic feelings for), because I’m a teenager and aren’t all teenagers always thinking about sex?? (Well…no, actually. I have to go with no on that.)

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

No one gets to define asexuality for you except you, just like no one gets to define your romantic orientation, gender identity, etc. Whether you’re completely sex-repulsed or you still want to have sex one day, whether you consider asexuality a huge part of your identity or NBD, whether you experience romantic attraction or not, you are ace and aces totally rule, ergo you totally rule!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I write under the name K. Noel Moore at https://www.wattpad.com/user/K_Moore13, most stories there have also been published on inkitt.com, and I sometimes post flash fiction on my personal (well, my only) blog at http://gayamericanoutlaw.tumblr.com. I’m also working on selling my first short story (a ghost story set in the 1930s with a gay narrator), so if you follow any magazines in the vein of Apex or Nightmare (by which I mean fantasy/sci-fi/horror-centric stuff) keep an out for me!

Thank you, Kit, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Amber

Today we’re joined by Amber. Amber is a fantastic visual artist and a writer. She mostly does fanart and fanfiction though she also does original work. Amber loves what she does and it shows in her work. She has a phenomenal attention to detail and color. It’s very clear she has a very creative spirit. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Amber 5

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’ve only been drawing for a couple of years, so I haven’t really developed a certain style yet. A lot of what I draw is fanart, from books or TV shows, but, especially recently, I’ve been drawing more and more OCs and original things. I do most of my sketching on paper with pencil (and a massive, heavy duty eraser) but I do most my Nice Good Pieces digitally!

I write as well, I’ve been writing for a longer time, and I mostly do queer romance or zombie/horror stories, and fanfiction.

What inspires you?

Other artists, mainly. I love looking at other people’s styles and techniques and try to expand my skills that way. A lot of inspiration also comes from art books, like ‘The Art of the Legend of Korra’, movie concept art, things like that. I have an active imagination (blame my ADHD) and am constantly coming up with scenes and images in my head and I try to draw them a lot.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved to draw, but when I was younger there was never the ‘I want to get really good at art and make a career out of it!!’ mindset. It was just fun and games, a way to pass the time when I was bored. It wasn’t until my older sibling went to university and I started paying attention to the details, like the behind-the-scenes of movies and shows and games, that I decided that’s what I wanted to aim for. I’ve been seriously drawing for two years now.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Uhh, not really. Most of the time I’ll sign with my Tumblr URL just so people know it’s mine, but I don’t have a special mark. Yet. I’m working on it.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I am a young aspiring artist, so I’ll say what I keep telling myself – don’t compare your art to others’ work. Compare yourself to your old art, sure, but never to artists with more experience than you. It won’t help. And, tutorials. Tutorials are life, tutorials are great. Always look out for tutorials, especially in the form of speedpaints! It really helps to actually see how things are done.

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Dreadlocks

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Just plain ol’ ace! Not quite sex repulsed, but almost.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Uh, yeah. My family knew nothing about it before I started to talk about, and I live in a small country town where everyone is very old fashioned, so yeah, I’ve encountered a lot of that. I used to try and correct people and explain why they were wrong about whatever, sometimes I still try if I’m in the right mood, but then people started to say that I was too defensive and that I should stop taking everything so seriously and stop trying to upset people. So now I mostly just grumble under my breath and rant to internet friends, and wait for the day when I’ll finally be an Adult and can have my say without getting into trouble.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

My dad used to always assume that because I was ace, I wasn’t interested in dating and people at all. When I came out as pan shortly after I came out as ace he kept asking how it was possible if I didn’t like people like that, and what would be the point of dating anyone. It took a while to actually get him to understand that ‘asexual’ does only mean ‘no sexual attraction’ and that yes, I am still able to date, and yes, it’s possible to date without having sex. Even at school and everywhere else I go – where I’m not out – everyone automatically thinks that and given up trying to correct them without giving myself away.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I’m not the best person for this type of advice, since I’m still struggling with it, but what helps me a lot is just finding and making friends that understand how I feel and friends that know a lot about asexuality and other queer identities. I follow a lot of blogs that have a lot of handy information and a lot of positive posts: (at) rainbow-hotline is a good one, as is (at) ace-big-sis!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have an art blog on Tumblr, over at cheldraws! I also have a Devinatart (ChelberNo1) and an Instagram (at cheldraws)!

I also write, both fanfiction and my own original works, you should be able to google ‘ChelberNo1’ and find where I post things.

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You Know that You’re Beautiful when You Work

Thank you, Amber, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Sherlock

Today we’re joined by Sherlock. Sherlock is a wonderful writer who specializes in short creepy stories. Her stories are published mostly on WattPad. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I’m basically a crappy armature writer who uploads story that are creepy to wattpad.

What inspires you?

Everything. For my one-shots, it’s random songs I hear. For my science fiction, bands like Starset and shows like firefly. Fantasy, random little sassy comments I make in my head.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I grew up reading all kinds of books with my mom and dad. Writing is a little hobby of mine I use not to scream my head off or hide in my room all day.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I usually include an aro-ace girl with an attitude, or some sort of sassy character.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It’s gonna be crap for… probably ever. But do it. Serious, just don’t reread it.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Very sex-repulsed aromantic

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really in my field, no.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I’M NOT A FRIKKIN’ PLANT

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t come out to the Fundamentalist Christian bully first. It’ll discourage you FOREVER

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

https://www.wattpad.com/user/ImAFrackingAlchemist

And I might upload on my Tumblr soon too.

http://frackyouimanalchemist.tumblr.com/

Thank you, Sherlock, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Where are the Asexual Voices C2E2 Presentation

As promised, here’s my presentation from C2E2 (all the thanks goes to Michi Trota of “Uncanny Magazine,” who was kind enough to record this for those of you who couldn’t be there. Thanks, Michi!).

This was one the scariest things I’ve done and I was so close to chickening out a couple times. But then I thought about how many ace artists there are out there, how many were in a situation to the one I was in just a few short years ago.

I have often written about my years in the closet, the number of toxic friendships I experienced, how I was made to believe I could never be an author because of my asexuality. This presentation was all about asexual artists and getting them the recognition they deserve, about showing that we do exist and we deserve to have control of our own narratives. A small part of it was also about myself, being the proud aro-ace feminist I have become. It was my way of saying “I love who I am, I’m proud of who I am, and I’m never going to let anyone take that from me ever again.”

Because asexuality is nothing to be ashamed of. Being asexual doesn’t mean you lack something, it’s just part of who you are. If anyone tells you differently tell them to fuck right off.

As I say in the description for this blog: “Asexuals deserve to be seen and heard.” And that is something I will always, always fight for 🙂

Interview: Atiya

Today we’re joined by Atiya.  Atiya is an incredibly talented visual artist who has a fascinating style.  She describes it as combining surreal and horror.  It’s quite interesting to look at, as all good art is.  Atiya is currently in the proces of getting her graphic design degree and judging from her work, she’s got a very bright future ahead of her.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My artwork definitely falls into the surreal/horror genre if I had to classify it as anything. I like my work to be pretty but I like to have that added element of something being off. I feel like people don’t realize that there is beauty in the bizarre.

What inspires you?

I take my inspiration from several different places. Some popular Japanese visual artists such as Shintaro Kago, Kazuo Umezu, and Junji Ito. Other independent artists (there are way too many to list) but just to name a few: Tiia Reijonen, Kaina Lacerda, and k00ps. Music is another big inspiration for me. Lately, I’ve been taking inspiration from Melanie Martinez, aeonfux, and Babeo Baggins.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing ever since elementary school but I didn’t realize I had a knack for it until about seventh grade. I never truly believed I could make it as an artist so I started focusing more on pursuing writing as a profession once I was in high school. I didn’t really sit back and decide that I wanted to create and sell art for a living until I started drawing again and teaching myself how to make art digitally. I started following a lot more artists online and I realized that it was possible with enough dedication and hard-work.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Hm. I guess the most noticeable “feature” of any of my work would be my emphasis on eyes. Multiple eyes, spider eyes, one eye, etc. It’s something I like to add in to most of my work if I can.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

JUST DO IT. You may think it’s impossible, you may have people in your life bashing your dreams, and you may hit roadblocks (scratch that, you WILL hit roadblocks) but it’s overcoming these obstacles that will make your work bigger and better. Take everything a step at a time but never lose sight of the big picture.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual/Panromantic

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Thankfully, I’ve yet to encounter anyone that’s made my sexual identity into something that I should be ashamed of. The fantastic thing about most of the art world is that it’s full of so many different people from all walks of life. People seem more accepting of others, regardless of their orientation.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably that a romantic relationship can’t flourish or survive without sexual intimacy. It’s something that is not only a flawed concept but something that makes members of the ace community feel like they’ll never have a meaningful relationship without compromising a part of themselves that they shouldn’t have to. Romantic relationships are possible without sex. Romantic relationships can be just as meaningful without sex.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Being ace is difficult, especially considering a lot of people both in and out of the LGBTQ community don’t understand it but embrace that part of yourself and don’t feel like you have to explain or defend your orientation. If it feels right to you then that’s all that matters. You don’t need validation from others.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Several places! The biggest one would be my art blog: ambartist.tumblr.com
There I have links to my Teepublic, Redbubble, and Society6 pages where you can view and purchase my work. I also have an Instagram account for in-progress things: AMBARTIST

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Thank you, Atiya, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Signal Boost: Dreamlords

Hey everyone!

I’ve got super exciting signal boost: a short film directed by a ridiculously talented asexual filmmaker.  I interviewed Britty Lea for the site a while back and was incredibly impressed with her enthusiasm and passion.  When she contacted me about a signal boost, I was like, “Oh hell yes!”

“Dreamlords” has a fantastically original premise and the cast is compromised mostly of women.  A movie directed by an asexual woman, starring mostly women.  And it’s a genre movie!?

Here’s a synopsis:

In a world where dreams are sold as drugs, Theo wants to be a Dreamlord and goes up against the woman who runs it all.

Britty is currently raising funds to get this movie made.  If you could donate anything, it would be very much appreciated.  Seriously, we need more asexual voices in filmmaking.  Please, consider supporting this film.  It’s going to be amazing.

Here are some links where you can get some more information (and donate)

The Indiegogo page: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dreamlords#/story

Tumblr: http://dreamlordsfilm.tumblr.com/

The Tumblr also has links to the Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts.  Come on, aces and ace allies!  Donate, signal boost, tell everyone you know.  Let’s help this ace get her film made!

Interview: Rose Titus

Today we’re joined by Rose Titus.  Rose is an author whose novella, “Night Home,” was released by Bathory Gate Press and is available through Amazon, Smashwords, and Barnes & Noble online.  Rose tends to write mostly horror and has a regular feature in Blood Moon Rising, an online horror magazine.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Author Photo

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a writer, but not a full time writer, I have a day job to support myself since I don’t make much from writing … like most writers and artists!  Anyway, I’ve had short stories published in literary magazines such as Lost Worlds, Lynx Eye, Bog Gob, Wicked Wheels, Weird Terrain, Blood Moon Rising, The Dead River Review, Mausoleum, and many others…  I have a regular feature in Blood Moon Rising called “The Rose Files,” which is basically “True Scary Stories From Life.”  My novella “Night Home” has recently been published with Bathory Gate Press and is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble .com, and Smash Words.  I write mainly fantasy and horror fiction, but also since I’ve had the experience of restoring a classic car I’ve had articles published in antique car magazines as well.  I also consider the old car project sort of a creative endeavor, by the way.

What inspires you?

Everything … every small thing that occurs in life is an inspiration.  Every little thing in life has significance, even if most people fail to notice.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved to read, but while reading someone else’s story or book, I often found myself saying, ‘I could have done this better.’

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really, but perhaps you would like to refer to my Author Rose Titus Facebook page.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It sound like a cliché, but, “don’t quit your day job, kid.”  Work all day, do creative stuff at night.  Stay sober, don’t get into drugs.  Too many creative people go down that path.  It leads to nowhere.  And just because you’re talented is no guarantee you’ll be famous overnight.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Aromantic Asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I am aware that there is so much horrible ignorance out there, and the stories I have heard from others, threats of rape, threats of death … I just don’t tell very many people.  I let people believe I’m nothing but a tragic spinster … with a cat.  I’d rather they simply just pity me than waste my time trying to explain.   I don’t anticipate many people of my personal acquaintance will be aware of the “Asexual Artist” project since very few people (in real life) that I associate with are even aware that asexuality exists, and probably won’t see this online anyway … 🙂  That is, I don’t anticipate many people of my acquaintance will even notice this, so go ahead and put it on your website, girl … (Oh heck, most people in my life don’t even know I had a book published because they will say, ‘you write about vampires!  Eeek!’ and wave crosses at me!)

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t exist, that we have no emotions, that we can’t be creative because of the myth that creativity “comes from the sex drive” – maybe for some people it does, but creativity can exist on its own, also … plus the usual stupid stuff, ‘you just need a good rape to straighten you out,’ etc.  People are terribly uneducated, so this is why these projects are important.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Just be yourself, don’t worry about trying to be like everyone else.  And be careful who you tell.  People can be a lot stupider and more vicious than a lot of young people realize.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Please look up Blood Moon Rising magazine online (http://bloodmoonrisingmagazine.com/index.html) to see some of my work – it’s a great online horror magazine that’s been around for about ten years with a lot of good writing.  Please look for my book on Amazon.  And if you would like, please visit my author Facebook page.

Thank you so much Rose for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Emily Griggs

Today we’re joined by Emily Griggs.  Emily is a fantastically talented and versatile visual artist and writer.  She has a thoroughly entertaining webcomic entitled “Heartless,” which has been signal boosted on this site before.  She has an incredibly bright future ahead of her and I cannot wait to see more of her work.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My business card reads “author, illustrator, maker, nerd” because I’ve never been able to pick just one thing to focus on, but everything I do tends to be geeky. I make fannish cards and prints on Etsy, I run a webcomic, and I write and illustrate tabletop role-playing games and genre fiction. I also dabble in jewelry and sewing, but much less seriously.

What inspires you?

Mostly, stories. Comics, games, movies, TV, podcasts… whenever there’s characters and a narrative, I tend to fixate on bits and think “wow, I want to do that… but with this change and that change and this other thing” and before you know it I’ve got something original. That’s one of my favourite things about tabletop RPGs, you always get to make the story your own as you go.

My visual art also revolves around storytelling. If you leave me alone for five minutes with a pen and paper, I’ll probably start drawing my tabletop RPG characters or someone from my webcomic.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was quite young, my mother quit her reliable day job to become a professional knitting designer, so I learned early on that it was okay to make your creative passions your professional ones too. Exactly what type of art I wanted to do for a living has changed dozens of times over my life, as my passions and opportunities changed.

I got into my exact field through a series of coincidences: a spur-of-the-moment idea, a blind submission, a forum post I happened to see. I’ve kept my eggs in quite a few different baskets, and the ones that have worked out are the ones I’ve continued to focus on. Fortunately, I’ve always been pretty flexible about my art, and working on several different projects at once suits me very well.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I’ve never really settled into one specific style or set of symbolism, and I don’t usually sign my work unless asked. Somehow adding a signature always feels too fancy, and I’m really not a fancy kind of person most of the time 😛

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you’re interested in becoming an artist professionally, remember that creative jobs are still JOBS. There will be parts of being a professional artist you hate, and you’ll need to get good at those too. Practice your art as often as possible, but learn about networking and marketing and customer service too, they are equally important to being skilled at whatever it is you do. Be open to new paths, and try to support your fellow artists wherever you can – nine times out of ten they’re more like coworkers than competition, and if you work together you can all prosper.

Also, never be afraid to apply for an opportunity, even if you feel under-qualified. It’s good advice in general, but it can be extra hard when you’re part of some marginalized group. When the world keeps telling you you’ll never make it, it isn’t easy to work up the courage to try for something that seems out of reach. But be brave if you can, and send in that story proposal or that creative job application or that illustration idea anyways. Put yourself out there: the worst they can do is say no, and maybe they’ll surprise you by saying yes! I’ve had both happen, and the few times I’ve been accepted been so, so worth all the nervousness and frustration around applying to opportunities that haven’t worked out.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m biromantic grey-asexual, though I often shorten that to just biromantic asexual. For me, the ace part of my identity is far more important to understanding who I am and what I have experienced than the occasional mild exceptions that make it “grey”.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

A little over a year ago, I attended a panel on queer comics at a major comic event. One of the panelists began their answer to a question with the phrase that was something like “the queer experience is about the moment of sexual attraction.” The other panelists and the audience nodded along, and I was far too shy to raise my hand to disagree.

I’ve never experienced overt aggression or belittlement for being ace, but that passive erasure was deeply painful. I was just starting to get back into comics, I was trying to write a script for one myself, and here a room of people who should have been my greatest allies were telling me that I didn’t belong without even noticing what they were doing. And it’s a kind of microaggression that’s happened again and again to me in all areas of life: this passive assumption that sexual attraction is universal.

I handled the incident at the comic panel by being utterly miserable about it for a few weeks, then doubling down on my efforts to complete a comic script with an asexual protagonist. Stories are what I do, and I can’t think of a better way for me to combat casual ignorance than by filling the world with stories about people like me.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

In person, aside from the misconception that we don’t exist, it’s been the idea that asexual people don’t enjoy sex or have low/nonexistant libidos by definition. It’s hard to make people understand exactly what not experiencing sexual attraction feels like, and how it’s different from the above.

In media, it’s the ever-lovely trope that asexual people are heartless. More than once I’ve had to stop and cringe when a show I’ve otherwise been enjoying uses “asexual” as an insult, or to show how bad a bad guy is. It’s pretty frustrating, but I try to use that frustration as fuel for writing more ace-positive media.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

For a long time, I was terrified to admit to myself that I was asexual because I wanted to be normal. I made excuses for how I was feeling, convinced myself that if I just tried harder I could experience sexuality in the same way other people did. I was sure that if I was asexual, it meant I’d be miserable forever.

But after accepting my orientation, I have never been happier. I’m more confident in myself, and my relationship with my (allosexual) partner has improved because I have the language to explain my needs and preferences without lies or half-truths. Sure there are still moments when I wish I could just be allo, but for the most part I feel so happy to have figured out an important part of who I am. Despite what the media is going to keep telling you, you can live an amazingly happy life without experiencing sexual attraction.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My art portfolio, publication credits, and other nonsense:
http://www.sweetingenuity.com/

My Etsy shop:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/SweetIngenuity

My RPG company, Supernatural 20 (which I run with my roommate, who’s also ace!):
http://supernatural-20.com/ or
http://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse/pub/8405/Supernatural-20-Games

My webcomic, Heartless:
http://heartless-comic.com/

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Thank you so much, Emily, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Signal Boost: Pack of Aces

Hi everyone!

I have completely forgotten to signal boost this amazing new project that I’m actually a part of.  Because I can be absent minded sometimes.

Claudie Arseneault, Lyssa Chiavari, Darcie Little Badger, Joel Cornah, and myself have started a blog called Pack of Aces (http://www.packofaces.com/).  We’re a bunch of genre writers who love the craft and are openly asexual (an evil alliance of asexual speculative fiction authors as the website states).  We’ll be writing about just whatever strikes our fancy:  writing, genre, being ace, etc.  We’re all the ace of something:

Claudie: Ace of Squids
Lyssa:  Ace of Stars
Joel:  Ace of Swords
Darcie:  Ace of Horror
Me:  Ace of Shifters

I’m so excited to be part of such a fantastic group.  Please check out the blog and give us a follow.  Sign up for the newsletter.  Recommend us to all your friends and loved ones.

Thank you!

Interview: S. C. Persson

Today we’re joined by S.C. Persson.  S.C. has a very interesting and unique style.  She’s a woman of horror, a genre I have an infinite amount of fondness towards, and finds a lot of beauty in darkness.  The images she sent to go with her interview are dark but incredibly interesting to look at.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I’m a visual artist — I paint and draw.  My art is very important to me.  Since I was young, I was riddled with a dark sense of creativity, and always found it incredibly satisfying to let it out on paper for other people to see.  The genre of my art is, I’d say, in the morbid/horror region, though I work outside of that as well!

What inspires you?

To put it briefly, everything and anything.  Specifically, I’m inspired by other artists, be it through music, visual art, photography, literature, etc.  Another person’s creativity fuels me.  Another inspiration is nature.  Although I don’t draw much nature in itself, I consider it nature’s art, and it ties in with what I just explained.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved drawing, and creating my own things.  I hated coloring books when I was little because it felt like plagiarism.  I was always investing my time in trying to come up with my own characters, my own stories, anything original that I could take full pride in.  So I guess it’s all just come naturally to me—I feel like I was meant to create.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My signature is kinda cute!

Signature

This is the best photo I have of it offhand, but as my alias is S. C. Persson, I write S. C. Per and add a sun at the end.  Originally, I just shortened my last name and added the sun because my nickname is Sunny, and I wanted to incorporate it.  My boyfriend later on pointed out that it happened to work perfectly with my surname.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep going.  Seriously, keep going.  You’re not too young.  You ARE good enough.  Don’t quit because you see other artists that are better than you.  There will always be someone better.  Practice as much as you can, and put your heart into it.  The rest falls into place, I promise.  Never give up for any reason.  Keep going.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m full-blown asexual!  I’m also panromantic, if you were curious.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

In the art field, no, I can’t say I’ve dealt with much of it.  That said, there is a lot of sexual themes in a lot of art, and that can make me uncomfortable.  I don’t blame artists for appreciating that subject, I’m just not into it.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it isn’t an “orientation.”  I hear a lot of “so you don’t like sex, why do you need a label for that?”  People don’t get the difference between asexuality and a low sex drive, and that’s a huge problem.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are not broken, and there is NOTHING wrong with you.  I stress it so much because that is the single most important thing to remember.  That, and you are relevant.  Don’t let anyone tell you that your (a) sexuality (esp if you’re demi or gray) isn’t a thing, or that you just want attention.  At the end of the day, sex is nothing more than an activity.  You wouldn’t torture yourself over disliking skiing or sewing, so why do it with sex?  It’s not the end of the world.  I mean it.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have a website, mutationart.com that you can check out!  It’s linked with mutationart.tumblr.com (it’s actually the same thing), so you can follow me and keep up with what I’m doing. 🙂  I also have a facebook page, which is just facebook.com/mutationart.  I’m working on getting more and more active on both, so stay tuned for that!!

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Thank you so much, S.C., for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.