Interview: CHM

Today we’re joined by CHM. CHM is a wonderful versatile writer. She has written in a few genres and styles. She mostly writes fantasy and historical fiction. When she’s not writing original work, CHM also dabbles in fanfiction. It’s clear she’s a dedicated writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art is mostly creative writing. I mostly write fantasy and historical fiction, as well as fanfiction.

What inspires you?

A number of things, but mostly music, and my own personal experiences.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I used to read a lot, and that slowly got me into writing my own stories. I also tend to daydream, and story ideas seem to spawn from daydreams.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I really like ending books with the title when possible.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t apologize for your work when presenting it. Stop yourself from saying things like “Sorry in advance” or “This is terrible, but” because it’s not. It’s the best you can do at that moment, and putting yourself down doesn’t help you improve.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m an AroAce lesbian. Oriented AroAces feel other types of attraction strong enough to warrant their own labels in their identities. The ones I feel are sensual and alterous attraction.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Never in my field, but in my personal life, I have. I usually deal with it using calm explanations.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we all hate sex, or that we just need to wait a while for sexual attraction to happen.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

No matter what you hear, no matter who says it to you, your identity is real, and you have a strong community backing you up. It doesn’t matter what someone else says about your identity, all that matters is the way the words you use to describe yourself make you feel.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I post all my fanfiction on my Quotev account! At LOZelfafan

Thank you, CHM, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Matthew Maione

Today we’re joined by Matthew Maione. Matthew is a phenomenal visual artist who also writes and creates fanart. He enjoys drawing faces and also does quite a lot of fanart. When he’s not creating visual art, Matthew enjoys writing and writes both fanfiction and original work. He’s particularly fond of historical fiction and crime suspense. It’s clear he’s an incredibly dedicated artist who loves to create as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a virtual artist and creative writer. I enjoy drawing faces and fanart.  I like playing with colour and texture a lot. I write almost entirely fanfiction and fiction. Historical fiction and Crime Suspense novels are some of my favourite to write.

What inspires you?

Music is a huge inspiration in my life, it can get me in certain moods that are perfect for writing. My fiancé often inspires me with the little things she does, dances around the house that make me want to write romance. Nature gives me a breath of life, revitalizes me and makes me want to draw.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

It was actually my older sister, she is a cosplay and traditional artist. She is 5 years older than me and I, being a younger sibling, was jealous and decided I needed to be better than her. Now I do it because I love it, of course.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I used to but since I lost most of my sight I’ve just been trying to re-explore what my art is. Playing with styles and shading to recreate it so I can still actually create, I used to sign my older works.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t give up! Make your weaknesses your strengths! There is no reason why you can’t pursue art if it’s what you love. Always do what makes you happiest, not what others want you to do.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as Grey-ace. I don’t really experience sexual attraction, but if I have a strong romantic connection with someone I am able to connect with them in that way as well. But it’s more of a, I do it because I love them and want to make them happy. Not to say that is the only way to do so, there are many ways to connect with your partners and sex is never a mandatory part of a relationship, but it can enhance your romantic connection. Simply put, while I don’t experience sexual attraction, for me, being intimate occasionally makes me feel emotionally closer.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t really in my field. It’s not something that just casually comes up in conversation but those I have told have all been very understanding. A few people I told were even comfortable enough with me after the fact that they were able to come out to me as well. In my daily life a few people have said that it’s because I hadn’t met the right person, or claimed they could fix me, very common things to run into. I mostly just ignore this and do my best to stay safe.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’ll never be able to have a permanent partner or that it’s a phase. I have a fiancé who has no problems with it, we have been together for two years. She is always very understanding if I’m having a repulsed day, because there are good and bad days. Some days I’m totally okay with the idea of sex and others I can’t stand to watch movies with implied scenes in them. But if you’re worried about finding someone who will love you, of course you will. There’s somebody for everyone.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Being asexual, while it is a way to identify, does not define you. If the thought of it is new or uncomfortable, it’s just another part of wat makes you, you. It’s not something to be ashamed of or hide, there are so many people out there who will accept you for exactly who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is Naoki-arts, I have AO3, Ammarettu. I’m currently working on getting my first novel published so any news on that will be found there as well!

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Thank you, Matthew, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Anne Hawley

Today we’re joined by Anne Hawley. Anne is a phenomenal novelist and editor who writes queer-themed historical fiction. She has a novel entitled Restraint, which features an ace secondary character. Anne is currently working on a new historical novel that features an ace protagonist, which is exciting (we need more historical fiction featuring aces). It’s clear she’s a talented and passionate writer who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write novels featuring queer characters in historical settings, exploring issues of identity and acceptance. I’m also a Story Grid Certified fiction editor, helping other writers shape their novels and screenplays.

What inspires you?

People’s individual search for wholeness and self-acceptance. The search for meaning. My stories revolve around people on spiritual journeys, and my editing work is focused on helping writers find and tell the story that’s in their heart to tell.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been writing since I could read. I started my first novel when I was nine. I was inspired by fantasy novels and wanted to create my own worlds.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always name something after a notable feature in my hometown of Portland, Oregon USA

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you’ll permit me to change the question, I’d like to say something to aspiring artists who may not have started young, or aren’t young anymore. Ageism is real and insidious in our culture, and it has a huge silencing power. Just as the dominant culture would still prefer it if you were allosexual and cisgendered (though thank goodness that’s changing), it would like you to be silent and invisible if you’re not young. If you have a story to tell, tell it.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Aromantic asexual. I think “autochor” is probably a term that applies to me.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

There’s not much ace representation yet in fiction, and as a person who came to the identity late in life, I’m still working to change my own ingrained belief that “nobody” wants to read stories without sexual tension, or about individuals who are fulfilled without romance.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexual people don’t really exist, and that people in my age group who claim that sexual identity are simply resigned to being “too old” for love or sex–or that we’re some sort of holdover from an earlier and more prudish, sex-negative era. We aren’t.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Many, many people in older age groups like mine have never even heard of asexuality. If you’re like me, hearing about it at a late age might create a real internal struggle, especially if you’ve given a lot of energy over the years trying to conform to old cultural standards of “normal” sexuality.

It helps to read as much as you can about all the nuances in the spectrum of asexuality, and realize that it’s okay to try on different names and labels. It might take a while to feel at home with one or another of them. But you might also find, as I did, that little by little embracing asexuality solves so many mysteries of your life.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

https://annehawley.net

Thank you, Anne, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jana

Today we’re joined by Jana. Jana is a wonderful young artist who both writes and does visual art. Most of her writing is fantasy and historical fiction. When she’s not writing, Jana does a lot of painting and drawing. Her work shows a creative mind and it’s clear Jana is an incredibly dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write stories and also I draw and paint. Stories are usually fantasy or historical fiction, with dark motives, while my drawings are more positive. I sometimes draw illustrations for my stories but that is rare for me. I also draw Harry Potter fan arts, as I am big fan of the story (and also I have written some fanfics but they aren’t in English).

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What inspires you?

I don’t really know. The inspiration just appears out of somewhere. And then it leaves. Sometimes it’s a sentence I hear, sometimes an internet joke or when I see the view from my window. It can be anything. I have periods of time when I see inspiration literally everywhere and then it stops and I don’t have any inspiration at all.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I think so. I remember I liked to draw and paint since I was very little and I remember that in kindergarten I was usually drawing, instead of playing with other children. And I still draw when I have the time (also if I don’t have) and usually I choose drawing over chatting with friends in class. With writing, it’s similar. I write stories during lessons in school because it’s fun and teachers don’t tend to notice. They usually think that I’m just taking notes while I really am creating a story.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always put my name on my drawings so no one can steal it from me (if it’s drawn on computer, it’s usually very big). That’s what almost everyone does I think. But other than that I don’t have anything like that. In my writings I don’t think I have something like that. My stories are dark and complicated, as are my characters, but that’s not that rare.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I am actually one of them, as I am sixteen, so to my fellow young artist: make art, do what you love and don’t give up. It can be hard but not giving up is worth it. If you love art, make it. Good luck to you (and to every artist here, you don’t have to be young).

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, ignorance by my mum. I came out to here so I could make terrible jokes and puns but it has gone a bit wrong. Well, she didn’t believe me (she still doesn’t I think) and was quite rude about it, because “I am too young to know” and “I can’t be ace if I have a boyfriend”. A few months later she was trying to understand and was asking questions but I felt really uncomfortable so I just left. But now I think I am starting to be a bit more comfortable around her, like when we are watching some TV series and they mention something sexual or say that someone is hot, I usually make a disgusted face or ask “really??”. Apart from that, I’ve only seen it on social media and it wasn’t directed purely at me but on the whole community.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I said before, it was what my mum said, that I am too young to know or that I can’t be ace if I have a boyfriend. Then of course things said on the internet and not aimed at me directly, like it is a disability or disorder or that we are plants. I like the last one the most.

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What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

To not try to unconditionally fit into a label. Take time. You don’t have to find it out right now, it’s okay not to know. I know it’s hard, I know it’s easier said than done. But don’t worry, you are not alone. There are many other people who feel the same and there are many people out there who will try to help you. Before I learned I was ace, I thought that I was lesbian (because women are cute), then that I was bi (because the sexual attraction I felt towards the two genders was equal – now I know it was zero).

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have an Instagram account but I don’t post much. I also am at Wattpad but I have only one English unfinished work published. I will try to be active on both social media (Wattpad is social media, isn’t it?) but I can’t really promise anything because I don’t know how much time will I have. On Instagram I am as Janethepurpleelf and on Wattpad as Fialová Víla.

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Thank you, Jana, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jessica Suphan

Today we’re joined by Jessica Suphan. Jessica is a phenomenal author who has recently published her debut novel, a psychological thriller entitled Perfect World. Jessica hasn’t met a genre she doesn’t like and writes in a variety of them. She’s an incredibly passionate and dedicated writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Please, tell us about your art.

Gladly! I’m an author, I write psychologically based stories, romance, historical fiction, science fiction, fantasy, any genre that pops into my mind. I write novellas and novels and short stories; just like I write whatever genre is needed for the story, I write whatever length is needed for the story I’m telling. Though most of them tend to be really long. It was very recent that I became a published author instead of an unpublished writer; my psychological thriller Perfect World came out in June. In a sentence, it’s about a young government agent who shoulders the burden of his utopia’s secret origins and has to struggle against psychosis because of those secrets. Just like all my other work, it’s extremely diverse. Perfect World features LGBT+ and ethnic as well as racial diversity. But I give all forms of diversity to my stories; it’s something that’s very important to me, and something I’ll never stop.

What inspires you?

It’s a dumb answer, but I’d have to say everything. I adore worldbuilding so cool tidbits from various cultures get tucked away into my mind along with science facts (mostly space) and psychological phenomenons. I’m a counseling psychology student so I learn a lot in the latter most’s area. Tumblr’s a great place too. I’ve gotten ideas of things to add to stories, ideas for characters, phrases that leap out. Perfect World actually has a scene inspired by a Tumblr post that asked why we never learn about other cultures in dystopian stories, and a character inspired by another post about how we never see a man sleep his way to the top. My friends do too, along with nature. Have you ever walked outside when it’s raining? Not a downpour, just raining. If you look at flowers and leaves then, it feels like the world is a fuzzier and gentler place. That’s a feeling that really sticks with me. And injustice.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been a writer as far back as I can remember. My first finished story happened when I was in fourth grade. It’s the first story I recall writing, but my parents assure me that it went on beforehand, and I’m not surprised. Like many writers I was a voracious reader; how could I not want to add to the number of worlds in the universe, even as a young child?

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Hm. I’m not sure if it falls under it, but I do love putting exact onomatopoeia in. Exact though. It’s such a delightful yet challenging thing to write if you want to get the true sound of what just happened. A metal fan’s blades don’t go rrrrrr, they go brrirrrr, a rock doesn’t grind sssssss against another rock, it grinds ssszzzzzt!, but you have to stop and listen and focus only on the sound in order to get it. I’ll spend easily an hour trying to figure out the spelling of something that isn’t even a word.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just write. A lot of advice will tell you to copy how great authors write, and you totally can if you want. But I’ve never seen the point of it. Write like you. That’s how you find your voice, something else writing advice frets about, because your voice is how you naturally tell a story. Not only that, but write what you know doesn’t mean you’re stuck writing high school stories until you graduate. Good heavens, can you imagine how awful that’d be? You can write anything you want because, for me at least, that phrase is about emotion. I will hopefully never experience what it’s like to have my child go missing. But I’ve experienced the emotions of panic and dread and frustration at my own helplessness. I haven’t gone to another planet (yet). Still, I know the thrill of exploring, that tight stomach and fizzy head that comes from embarking out into something I couldn’t possibly know. And don’t write for word counts. I’ve found that sitting down to write a scene gives you a lot more success than sitting down to write ______ words. In the latter you’re pausing to count words, focused on those instead of the story. When you sit down with the intent to write a scene you’re honed in on the story and moving it forward, and we all know scenes can be very long. So if you write one you can look back on pages instead of a paragraph that leaves you wanting more.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m homoromantic asexual! A girl who has romantic interest in other girls but no sexual attraction or urges whatsoever.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Everything I’ve experienced has been ignorance. Since I hang out with other writers who also know the importance of diversity that’s slightly less common than it otherwise might be, but it’s still very much present. I personally really enjoy teaching people things. So if something comes up, I take pleasure in patiently but (if needed) firm explanations. The vast majority of the time, people just need to be treated with respect and not attacked for their ignorance, and they’re happy to learn and respect. Of course you have to be more aggressive with some people though, it can’t be helped. I do experience compassion fatigue though with all the activism I do (where your brain is so overloaded and so tired from caring so much about everything you could read the most heinous article title and be unable to feel anything about it), so sometimes I let a comment pass. With those though, they have to be both ignorant and not harmful in a large way.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuality = aromantic pops up, but the most common one is absolutely that asexuals don’t have sex ever. Some don’t. But some, myself included, have. Asexuals might like it on an intellectual level, because they crave physical contact that much, because they enjoy the emotional intimacy that comes from it, or any number of other reasons. It’s very common for me to get nothing but crickets when someone says that I just need to try sex and I tell them I’ve had it several times and am still asexual. That’s my truth, it’s the truth of many people, and there’s nothing wrong or “lying” about it.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You exist. You’re okay. I promise you are, you’re not broken and you’re not wrong. There hasn’t been a term for us until now because there wasn’t a safe space for us to be heard, talking about sex was taboo, and the expectation was that it was a necessity not a pleasure. That’s why it’s “new”, not because it’s made up. We’re real.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Right here on Tumblr! My blog is scripturient-manipulator, and you can find Perfect World as a print book, as an ebook, or for your kindle. Feel free to message me to talk as well!

Thank you, Jessica, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Oliver

Today we’re joined by Oliver. Oliver is a wonderful up and coming writer. They’re working toward publication and have written a fascinating sounding queer mystery novel. Oliver is admirably dedicated to the craft of writing, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write historical fiction mostly along with some fantasy. My current project is a queer mystery novel that is finished and under revision. It follows a detective’s faith in humanity as his professional and private life begin to unravel.

What inspires you?

I draw much of my inspiration the books that I enjoy reading and my own experiences. I grew up absolutely in love with the stories of Holmes, Poirot, Marple, and Dupin just to name a few. As I grew older, I started to look at these characters that I had adored so much and think about how much better they could have been if the traits that they and many others had been coded with were clearly written about. I wanted stories about diverse characters that were allowed to be imperfect and weren’t forced into awkward romances by their writers. While all of the detectives that had guided me through my childhood came the closest to that, there were still so many things that I would have changed about the stories. Finally, I realized that what I needed to do was just write my own stories the way that I wanted them to be told.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been writing since I was very young. It was mostly just short stories that I could fit on one sheet of paper. It was just a fun way to pass the time, but as I got older I began to realize that it was one of the few things that I was truly passionate. Because of that, I decided to go to college to study English and creative writing.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My work sounds dark, but I actually refuse to bury my gays or have sad endings. There’s just too much of that right now. I also write characters with established queer identities as opposed to coming out stories. Coming out stories were very important to me when I was starting to accept myself as being ace, gay, and nonbinary. Yet as I grew older, I found that what I wanted wasn’t stories based around accepting oneself and more things along the line of “You’re bi? Neat! I’m trans, she’s aro, let’s go on an adventure.” So that’s what I write.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Any kind of art takes practice. It doesn’t matter if you think you write silly stories, draw poorly, sing off key, etc. If you enjoy it, keep doing it. Eventually, you’ll come to realize that you’ve come a long way from where you started. Don’t give up on something you love just because you don’t think that you’re good at it. Putting art in the world is a beautiful thing whether you’re an artist that’s a household name or you just like making things for yourself.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual, still a bit unsure of where I fit romantically, but I’m in no rush to figure it out.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve been lucky that all of the beta readers that I’ve worked with have been very respectful of who I am and my choice to have ace and ace spectrum characters. Being ace isn’t something that people always understand, but there are also plenty of kind people who, while they may empathize, will still be positive, respectful, and supportive. If anybody tries to give me guff about my ace characters, they’re more than welcome to go read something else. Ace people deserve to see themselves well represented and I intend to add more books about ace people to the world.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The two misconceptions that I run into the most are that asexuality just doesn’t exist or that aces are all innocent and naive. I’m honestly not sure what to say about the first one other than that I’m concerned about how close minded those people must be. Given how many people have found and come to use the label of asexual in the past years, it’s clearly a thing. But being a trans person, I hear people talking about how that’s not a thing either so I guess if people don’t like something they just like to pretend it doesn’t exist. Ace stereotypes are difficult sometimes because I am a very stereotypical ace. I’m mentally ill, childish, introverted, etc. Even my friends who are very accepting of aces and have taken some time to read about the ace spectrum often associate being ace with the stereotypical traits about it and that’s highly frustrating. There’s so many aces who don’t fit that model and if we view asexuality in one dimension it just makes it even more difficult for aces who don’t fit the stereotypes to come to accept themselves.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay to take your time. Not having an exact word or words for who you are is absolutely fine. What matters is that you’re comfortable. If that means that you want to call yourself asexual even if you’re not totally sure if that label works for you, go for it. If it means that you think you’re asexual but don’t want to call yourself ace or be out, go for it. No matter what, you’re not alone and who you are is natural, good, and wonderful.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

To be honest, it’s probably going to be quite a while before I publish anything. I have a short story with an aro ace protagonist on my aro ace Tumblr (at aroacepositivityplace) along with some artwork of ace headcanons on my art Tumblr (at olihaspencils). Messages on either blog are always welcome. I love talking about all things ace with people. Once I get published, I probably will create a Tumblr specific to my books.

Thank you, Oliver, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Kaity

Today we’re joined by Kaity. Kaity is an absolutely fantastic musician who plays the violin. She particularly enjoys playing music from movies and TV shows. She’s also quite passionate about the classics too. Aside from violin, Kaity is also a very enthusiastic writer. She specializes in historical fiction, but has also written fantasy. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m both a writer and a musician. I’ve played the violin for about ten years and I’ve been writing for just about as long. I love playing songs from my favorite shows/movies — I’m currently learning Rey’s Theme from Star Wars — but I also love the classics too. I have a great love-hate relationship with Tchaikovsky. As far as writing goes, I’ll write a little of everything. My niche seems to be historical fiction, but I’ve written fantasy too.

What inspires you?

Music, really. A lot of times I’ll listen to a song that will inspire the muse and start an idea in my head. It’ll grow and blossom until I finally sit down and write it. For playing music, it’s just a love of playing and my violin.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I honestly don’t remember what got me interested in writing. I just remember working on my first “lengthy” story, which was 12 pages at the time. That story actually became my first published novel. For my violin, it was simply meeting my elementary school’s orchestra teacher. I had wanted to play the flute since first grade, but you could join orchestra first. So in fourth grade, I took up the violin and I fell in love. Before that, I really had no interest in being an artist.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

For my music, not so much. With writing, there’s actually a lot of emphasis I put on names for characters, places, etc. The names always have some meaning that relates to the story, character development, or even foreshadowing for later events. I love knowing those little secrets are there, whether my readers pick up on them or not.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be discouraged! Writer’s block really sucks and I went through a period of it for about a year and a half. But you’ll eventually find something to knock yourself out of it. In the meantime, do what you can. Write little scenes instead of full novels. Find another form of art that you can learn or improve on in the meantime.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual biromantic, but especially a sex-repulsed asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve had the conversation with many people about “well, how can you like it if you haven’t tried it?” My go to analogy for that is: you don’t have to touch a hot stove to know it’s going to hurt, so I don’t have to try sex to know I don’t like it. I just try to be patient and answer any questions they have to spread Ace awareness.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As above, it’s the whole “you don’t know if you haven’t tried it.” It’s frustrating to me, but I just try my best to explain it.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Your orientation is valid no matter what anyone else says, and how you feel is the most important. If you identify as Ace, then someone else’s opinion does not invalidate that. It’s what makes you feel comfortable.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My violin stays within the confines of my room for right now, but you can find my two books on Amazon! Building Amana and Obscured Destiny. I wrote them both as a young teenager.

Thank you, Kaity, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.