Interview: Laura Welch

Today we’re joined by Laura Welch. Laura is a phenomenal musician who makes a living as a pianist. She mostly performs for musical theater and she also plays at the local dance studio for the ballet classes. Laura plays a wide variety of musical styles and has even performed as part of a symphony orchestra on occasion. It’s a clear she’s an incredibly passionate and dedicated artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a musician – a pianist, specifically. I am classically trained, though nowadays I am highly experienced in playing a multitude of genres, from your typical “classical” fare to jazz to modern-day pop. I make a living primarily through playing piano – something I try not to take for granted as not everyone can say they live off doing something they love and don’t really consider “work.” I play for a church service (sometimes two) every Sunday morning, and I currently accompany ballet classes at a dance studio. In the past I have accompanied voice classes held at various schools in the area, and at one point I was part of a thirteen-piece jazz orchestra as well as a ragtime band. Occasionally I am given the opportunity to play in the local symphony orchestra, but it does not happen too often.

Currently one of the biggest presences in my life where my talent is concerned is the theatre community where I live. I played my first musical back in 2007 – I was freshly nineteen, I recall – and after that I was quickly absorbed into the world of musical theatre. Since then I’ve played for a plethora of shows (I stopped counting about three years ago), and I’ve even gotten to music direct a small handful of them! I can’t see myself stopping any time soon, so long as I am available and can be put to use.

What inspires you?

I find much of my inspiration comes from the people I get to work with in whatever environment I happen to be playing in. In theatre, it’s the actors, crew, and musicians I get to perform alongside. In the dance studio, it’s the teachers and students whose movements are supported by my playing. In both of those cases there’s a feeling of collaboration for me; we are creating something together by combining our respective talents, whether it’s for an audience or for ourselves in that moment. The challenges that come with playing alongside other people – be it other musicians, dancers, vocalists, or whoever – push me to do better, to be worthy of working with these other performers who have dedicated themselves to their own crafts and are working just as hard to do well by them.

I also get inspired by particularly moving pieces of music, especially ones that are adept at conveying an emotional story. I am a huge instrumental score/soundtrack junkie, whether it’s from films or video games or what have you, and it’s not uncommon for me to shut myself away in my bedroom with my phone and a pair of earbuds and just sit and listen for an hour or three. Doing so when I have the time is relaxing for me, but it also reminds me why I do what I do and why I love it so much. Having a story told to me through music alone reminds me that I’m capable of doing the same, and what a pleasure and privilege it is to be able to reach someone else’s mind and heart through something that I can create.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always held a fascination with music, even when I was a very young age. At this point I really don’t remember always wanting to be a musician, but when I was seven my parents asked me if I wanted to take piano lessons and I recall taking to them immediately. My parents got me this tiny little keyboard to practice on, and once it was apparent that I was getting better and better – and fast, at that – my teacher urged them to buy me an actual piano. (Spoiler alert: they chose to make the investment, and I bet they’re glad it paid off!) As time went on I got more and more invested in being able to play the piano, so much so that I left other hobbies and commitments behind (including playing softball and learning to play the trumpet). It got to the point where it followed me to school, so to speak: I got my first real shot at accompanying in sixth grade, when I learned to play a song we were singing in choir and was then allowed to accompany the group at a concert. More opportunities arose in middle school when I joined the orchestra and jazz band, and by high school I was both singing and playing piano in the choirs I had joined. By the time I was nearly a legal adult I had clearly decided that yes, this was definitely the path I wanted to continue taking.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I’m not sure if calling it a unique feature is correct or not, but I’ve developed this one tendency that pops up when I’m involved in musical theatre that people have come to associate with me: I have to see to it that the production’s band/orchestra gets a name. I just do. Every musical has a band, and every band needs a name. It’s silly, but I’ve found it can be a bit of a bonding experience among the musicians (and even the cast and crew) when it comes to deciding upon one.

Often times the names will be inspired by something from the musical in question; sometimes it’s a line of dialogue, sometimes a lyric, and sometimes even a tempo marking in our music. Two years ago when I music directed a production of The Rocky Horror Show, we named our band The Satanic Mechanics (inspired by a lyric taken from “Sweet Transvestite”). Last year in a production of Little Shop of Horrors, inspired by the brief gore featured at the end of the first act, we called ourselves Gut Buckets (but you can’t just say it; you have to sing it to the tune of the Hot Pockets jingle). And recently for a production of Chicago, we had two drummers splitting the five-week run between them, which essentially meant we had two different bands, so we needed names for both of them! We ended up alternating between The Spread Eagles and The Dirty Bums (both names having been pulled from one of the show’s most famous numbers, “The Cell Block Tango”).

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It’s easier said than done, but try not to let your mistakes and insecurities discourage you from practicing your craft. Growing up, I was very much a perfectionist concerning just about everything I did, and I practically crippled myself with doubt whenever I hit too many walls when it came to practicing piano. I could be very impatient with myself, and it took me years to allow myself the courtesy of making mistakes without beating myself up afterwards. It doesn’t mean that I don’t still occasionally have bad days where I get frustrated with myself. If it does happen, though, I do allow myself some distance from whatever hurdle it is I’m trying to overcome before I attempt it again. Practicing in anger does me no good at all, and brief time away can help refresh my mood.

One other thing I try and make sure I do when practicing is give my weaknesses twice the time that I give my strengths. Sure, it’s fun playing the passages I’m good at over and over again, but that intimidating section I’m still struggling with will continue to be difficult if I never actually practice it. Yes, it will be tedious and slow-going and I may not enjoy it at first, but before I know it a week will have gone by and suddenly it’s that much less intimidating! Why was I ever afraid of that section in the first place? It’s so easy now! Because I gave it time. Slowly and in small increments, yes, but time nonetheless.

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Photo by the Humboldt Light Opera Company (https://www.hloc.org/)

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am gray-romantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve never encountered prejudice in my field. I was never really worried about judgment from within the theatre community, considering the vast diversity of orientations and identities I’ve seen among the people in it. Though I publically came out as asexual about four years ago, I’m sure there are still plenty of people I work with at places like the dance studio and the church I play for who have no idea I’m ace. The topic of my orientation is not one I feel comfortable just diving into without good reason, though if it happened to come up I think I’d be fine with divulging the information. The majority of people I work with outside the theatre community are pretty broad-minded, so I’d like to think I wouldn’t encounter any prejudice from them either.

I’ve only personally experienced a couple of moments of ignorance, and outside my field at that, but it was never anything hurtful. One instance was a person not knowing of the existence of the asexual spectrum (who listened intently when I offered to explain it to them), and the other was a person making a (mostly) harmless generalizing assumption about asexuality in an offhanded comment while in conversation with me.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The idea that because a person is asexual, it means that they don’t desire – or even understand – relationships at all is one that I’ve encountered enough that it’s starting to give me a headache. I’ve seen it perpetuated in various forms of media, from fanfiction to comics and then some. It feels like too many people zero in on the misconception that asexuality = NO SEX, and then too many of those people continue on and assume that without sex there can be no relationship, which is utter bullshit.

People can be asexual and enjoy and desire sex, just as they can be asexual and not enjoy or desire sex. People can be asexual and feel and desire romantic love, just as they can be asexual and not feel or desire romantic love.

The lack of sexual attraction towards others does NOT automatically disqualify the possible desire for romance and/or intimacy.

The sooner the general populace starts to understand this, the less headachy future me will be.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You do not have to figure yourself out right now. You have time. Some days it will feel like you needed to figure shit out weeks ago but the answer is nowhere in sight. Some days it won’t bother you at all. Just know that solving the puzzle that is you often takes more than a day. Sometimes it takes months, or even years. It’s possible you may never figure it out completely. But know that in the end, regardless of everything, your feelings are still valid. It sounds cheesy, but listen to your heart and your body. If it doesn’t feel right, don’t do it. If you think it feels right and you feel safe, maybe give that something a shot.

And if in the end using a label makes you feel that much more comfortable, use it. If the idea of using labels is uncomfortable, then don’t. You are no less valid regardless of what you do or don’t do. You are you. And you matter.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I don’t really have an online space dedicated to my craft. (I keep telling myself to make an artist page on Facebook or post recordings on Soundcloud, but so far no dice.) I do, however, occasionally post things on Instagram (at flamingo.hate.marshmallows) related to my adventures in musical theatre. I’ve got two shows in the works as we speak, so there should be some fresh musical-related content added soon!

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Thank you, Laura, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Noelle

Today we’re joined by Noelle. Noelle is a fantastic visual artist who does ceramics and crochet. She enjoys making art that can also be touched and felt. Her crocheted creatures are absolutely adorable and the colorful material is so incredibly pretty. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

gir embroidered pillow
Gir Embroidered Pillow

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a mostly self-taught artist. I work completely in art that you can touch with your hands, mostly in crochet and ceramics. I like to create things that people can wear, use, or that they can cuddle up with. I have more crochet hooks than make-up pallets. I have a particular fascination with Tunisian crochet and amigurumi, although I also enjoy making hats, scarves, and gloves.

What inspires you?

My biggest inspiration is music. It’s always been a happy place for me, knowing I would have a safe haven at the listening end of an iPod. I’m also inspired by color, nature, and yarn. I’ve always been of the opinion that the world doesn’t have enough color. I also love to see my fandoms come to life, like Pokemon, Firefly, Steven Universe, among others.

Milotic doll
Milotic Doll

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I haven’t always considered artistry. In my younger years, being an artist was being able to draw or paint, or play music. I can do neither of those things. It wasn’t until I was older that I realized art could be realized in many forms. As for what got me interested, my mother, a jewelry artist, taught me how to crochet when I was around 9. It started with how to make a simple chain and I taught myself everything else with the help of Youtube and some old crochet pattern books we have in the house. It wasn’t until I was in college that I discovered amigurumi, and began to crochet with a passion. Now, it’s a very comforting and fun artistic outlet.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

The Chinese Hanzi for “Serenity” shows up quite a bit in my work. In my pottery, it’s carved into the clay body somewhere. I don’t sew it onto my crochet, but my tools are held in a bag that has the symbol drawn all over the place.

dragon egg dice bags
Dragon Egg Dice Bags

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Make art for you. No one can stop you. Always remember that you have a refreshing new way to portray the world, new stories to tell, and a new song to sing. Always keep making stuff and doing what you love.

Stained glass hummingbirds
Stained Glass Hummingbirds

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a gray-romantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve never experienced prejudice/ignorance in my field, thankfully, as it so very rarely comes up. When it does, most people are understanding.

In a personal and/or social setting, however, that’s a complete yes. I have family members that prefer to think I never told them. I have also had friends who told me, to my face, that they could fix that.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That there is something medically wrong with me. I have been asked several times, by complete strangers, whether I have seen a doctor, because it was “not normal”. I’ve also been told that I just haven’t found the right man, or that my previous sexual experiences just weren’t up to snuff and I would need to be patient.

Moonkin
Moonkin

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are NOT BROKEN. You are valid. Don’t ever believe anyone that tells you otherwise. Take your time coming to terms with the realization, because it can be a big pill to swallow. And of course, if you ever need to talk, talk to someone you can trust. If you’re still in school, seek out counseling services. They’re free, and the counselors really do care.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have an Etsy (etsy.com/shop/SerenitySkyCrochet), where I put my crochet works on sale. I also have a DeviantART (elledos.deviantart.com) where you can see most of my works, including my early high-school creations.

Baby umbreon doll
Baby Umbreon Doll

Thank you, Noelle, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Amy

Today we’re joined by Amy. Amy is a wonderful young artist who specializes in digital art. She has dabbled in watercolors and does some animation as well. Her work demonstrates an enthusiasm and love of drawing, which is always great to see. Amy is definitely an artist with a very bright future. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m currently an almost sixteen year old traversing through high school, with a love of art stemming from late primary, when I got bored in maths and picked up a pencil to amuse myself.

The mediums I predominately use are digital, both using my iPad (without a stylus) and my laptop (using a graphics tablet) to paint and animate short gifs.

I also dabble in watercolour, due to the influence of my grandfather, who also paints, and I enjoy it a lot!

In terms of my style, it is quite cartoony, due to the influence of my love of animation, and fits the fact I often draw more fanart than anything else.

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What inspires you?

As I’ve mentioned, a lot of my inspiration is drawn from animation, as well as videogames, particularly Nintendo ones! Other things like space and nature, particularly the sky, often inspire colour palettes and the tone of pieces.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I haven’t always wanted to be an artist, in fact when I was in primary school I wanted to be a meteorologist or vulcanologist! I was massively interested in weather and natural disasters, and still am.

What made me want to draw a lot started in late primary, in maths class boredom, and the fact I’d always enjoyed art class! The fact that a lot of my friends liked art helped a lot as well.

I only recently tried animating, and that made me realise that that was something I wanted to do. Currently my drawback is lack of a proper animation program, but I’ve found a few ways around it!

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always sign my art with my Tumblr and Twitter names, but other than that nope!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t give up if your art isn’t as good as you expect, you just have to work on it a little each day, and it will add up! You might be discouraged by parents or other figures, that say that art isn’t a “real” career choice or job, use that as motivation to prove them wrong. Art jobs are hidden, but they are there, people just don’t realise what exactly art jobs are. The road to good art is a hard one, and I’m nowhere near the end, as there is no end. Just keep believing in yourself and you can draw, paint, sculpt, act, sing and write anything.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m gray-romantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Personally, not really, being a high schooler means I don’t have a job that is currently very serious, due to me working at a pub as odd jobs and clean up duty…

However outside of jobs, I haven’t encountered much prejudice that’s outright against asexuality, more just compulsory sexuality statements in classes and such. I tend to ignore it, as I don’t particularly want to teach a vocabulary lesson to a class I don’t even like or trust.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably the whole coupling aromanticism with asexuality and treating them as the same.

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What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are not alone, and your asexuality is not the core of your being, it is a small part in a sea of many other things that make you, you. Your orientation is valid, and so are your feelings about it whether they be good or bad, just try to find a bright side, it helps a lot with accepting it.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have a personal Tumblr at silvergarnet12 that I reblog art from my art only blog at silvergarnet12art.

I also have a Twitter silvergarnet12, as well as an account on an app called SketchClub, which is accessible online, with the name “SilverGarnet“.

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Thank you, Amy, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.