Interview: Tricia

Today we’re joined by Tricia. Tricia is a phenomenal digital illustrator who does a number of different things. She enjoys drawing fluff muffins, which are like fairy cats. Tricia is also interested in designing various patterns, which makes for some fascinating visuals. Her work is beautiful, brimming with color and detail. It’s very clear that she’s an incredibly talented artist, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I love to illustrate whimsical, nostalgic looking things. One of my favorite things to draw are these little creatures I made up years ago called fluff muffins, which are essentially fairy cats. They’re called fluff muffins because at the largest, they’re around the size of one of those giant muffins.

Lately I’ve also been very interested in surface/pattern/textile design. It’s crazy because once you realize artists make everything, you start seeing their art everywhere. Walking through Target was so distracting because I just kept picking up things with illustrations on them and thinking ‘I could do this someday!’ It’s very exciting, though. I hope to see my work on anything from bedsheets to paper plates someday.

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What inspires you?

There’s so much that inspires me. As a little kid, I had a ridiculously strong imagination. I clearly remember this time I went outside to talk to my mom, but it was so windy that the wind picked me up and I was flying in the air for a while until my mom grabbed me, put me back on the ground, and sent me back inside. In reality, the wind just knocked me over a few times, but that’s not how I remember it. I’ve always looked at the world and wondered if there wasn’t something just underneath, something a little bit more fantastical. On a more practical level, I’m fascinated by light and color.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I haven’t always wanted to be an artist, and didn’t really draw regularly until I was thirteen. I decided to work towards becoming a professional at fifteen-sixteen.

I do remember being fascinated with tileable patterns as a little kid though. I would spend hours looking up patterns I could tile for my desktop background. I just recently started designing patterns, but it’s so cool to be on the other side of it!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Once I hid the Ninth Doctor into an illustration of my original characters. Can you find him?

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What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I know everyone says this, but truly the biggest advice to give is to just keep going, keep practicing. If you’re passionate about what you’re doing, refuse to give up. You may not be very good now, but you will be! Nobody was ever very good in the beginning, trust me.

Most importantly, keep your eyes open and study. Art is all about utilizing a visual library, and observing the world around you is the best way to build that. You’ll be amazed how much you learn just by paying attention.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as just aspec (aromantic and asexual spectrum), but if I had to figure out something more specific, I would be a romance and sex favorable aroace, with a potential preference for women. It’s a little up in the air, so I just stick to aspec for now.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not in my specific field, but I’ve heard the typical comments here and there, things like “you’ll find the right person some day” and variants of that sentiment. One person told me I “just hadn’t smelled the right cologne yet.” I generally just try to educate and move on.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuality is all about sex repulsion and not about attraction. It’s not that asexuality is a lack of sexuality at all, it’s just the lack of sexuality connected to other people.

That said, something I love about the ace community is its inclusive nature. Asexuality can cover those who are sex repulsed, even if they do experience attraction. It covers those who are traumatized, and it covers those who only experience attraction every once in a while. I’m so proud to be a part of a community that is open to all of the in betweens, I just wish more people knew that was the case.

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What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are not alone, and you don’t have to have it all figured out. Orientation is complicated and confusing, I know. But you’re not broken or weird, and labels are just there to help you understand yourself better. It’s okay if they change, and it’s okay if they don’t. Take care of yourself and don’t force anything you’re uncomfortable with.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find more of my work at notifyneelix here on Tumblr. Thank you for reading!

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Thank you, Tricia for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Shay

Today we’re joined by Shay. Shay is a wonderful visual artist who specializes in a cartoon style. She is a self-taught artist and is currently working to get a degree in animation. Her work has a masterful use of color and a sense of whimsy, which just makes you want to smile. She’s clearly a dedicated and talented artist, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

me windbreaker teal
Me Windbreaker Teal

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a self-taught digital illustrator and I’m pursuing a degree in 2D animation! I prefer to use a very Western cartoon-like style. Picking out bright or pastel color schemes is my favorite!

What inspires you?

I often draw my favorite YouTubers, my friends, and my two adorable dogs! I also do a lot of self-portraits. Lately I’ve been trying to create my own original characters, but those are all still a work in progress. When I’m not sure what to draw, I sometimes will come up with a color palette that I love and go from there!

amy sick
Amy Sick

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been interested in drawing, but I didn’t set my mind on really trying to improve until about 6 years ago. Growing up I would only consider more “practical” careers like graphic design or marketing. That is, until a year ago when it suddenly occurred to me that real people with real lives actually get to illustrate and animate for a living. And it made me think “Why couldn’t that be me?”

chica colored
Chica

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not typically, but when drawing myself I often include daisies somewhere in the illustration just because I really love them, and four-leaf clovers because I have a knack for finding them and they just seem to appear everywhere in my life. And it couldn’t hurt to have a little luck on my side!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to try out elements of a style from artists you look up to. As long as you’re not tracing or essentially/literally claiming their work as your own, it will certainly help you discover your own unique style. Everyone’s signature style is just a conglomerate of things they saw and just thought to themselves “Wow! I really like that! I wonder if I could replicate that!” Trying out styles like that really helps you come into your own with time.

ethan peace
Ethan Peace

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual and heteromantic!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really, mostly just those that have never had the concept of asexuality explained to them. People tend to associate sex with something artistic, and therefore assume that all artists want that in their lives, which is not the case at all!

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Jack and Mark Dudebros

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s just being picky or that an ace person just “hasn’t found the right person yet.” If you’re asexual you don’t have any interest at all. I have never once in my life looked at someone and fantasized about having sex with them, and I’m in college. That has nothing to do with not finding the right person.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Please don’t stress about it too much! You may face some prejudice and ignorance about asexuality in your life, but at the end of the day you know how you feel, and nobody else can change that about you no matter how much they want to. You are not broken!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m most active on my Tumblr blog, but you can find me on these social medias:
DeviantART: https://sorrelheart.deviantart.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/sorrelheart_jpg
Redbubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/shaytastic

baylee happy
Baylee Happy

Thank you, Shay, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jai M. King

Today we’re joined by Jai M. King, who was interviewed quite a while ago. Their company has since evolved into something almost completely new. Jai is a fascinating and unique artist that has a style that’s entirely their own. They’re behind Madjaw Dolls, a brand gearing toward multimedia arts. They do a lot of illustrations but also quite a lot of writing as well. Jai is currently working on a science fiction series, which is part of the Madjaw Dolls universe. Based on their interview, Jai is a fascinating and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

(WARNING: Some images contain nudity and are risque)

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King watercolor

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Madjaw Dolls is brand gearing towards the multimedia arts. There is one main universe in which all products and creations stem from. The stories under MJD combine influences of retro-fantasy, raypunk and Grimm’s fairytales to create a distinct branch of dark tales that are both innovative in terms of character and world design but also blunt in terms of political and social commentary.

My work ranges from traditional illustration to digital most recently with working on the IPad Pro. I am also going into producing for multimedia to expand MJD so I am also a creative director in collaborative projects.

Currently I’ve been in the process of producing a science fiction series called “Sector M.I.” which takes you through a multi-world war. The world design is very distinct to the universe in which a multitude of my stories derive from. Most of what will be seen at Madjaw Dolls exists within that universe.

What inspires you?

My inspirations range from the array of media I grew up on to naturally being attracted to retro-media such as anime/manga from the 1970s-1990s to western influences such as Ralph Bakshi’s “Cool World” to much of the bizarre fantasy works from the 1970s and also the strange futuristic narrative of 1970s funk music. I also grew up loving the Grimm Brothers which has influenced my work and story process quite a bit. I love creating words that feel at least a little uncomfortable. A lot of my work has a warped quality that I’ve developed purposefully for the stories. I’m not so much about supplying reality as I’m about creating something entirely new.

Since my last interview with Asexual Artists I do think I’ve returned to my roots a little more with my influences. Every project I take on entails a good amount of research which I personally love as I often find that people tend to overlook just how much time and research it takes to develop a well-crafted creative process. I think my influences change the more I grow and learn.

kingfin
Kingfin

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been illustrating since I was little though around 17 was when I landed my first job illustrating a children’s book, though I didn’t know very much about illustrating at the time and taking on the process of illustrating a book was hard, I learned a lot about what to do and what not to do when illustrating books. I went back and forth for a while as I was potentially good at so many things, ultimately illustration is where my roots have always been, I’ve been looking into multimedia producing for the very reason that I can expand in the future through different platforms and ways to tell the stories, starting with graphic novels; which the graphic novels under MJD will be a combination of written and illustrative narrative, a format I’ve been working on to be a little more unique to MJD.

I learned quite a bit in the last year after interning for another comic artist and developing sound connections with illustrators and comic artists who’ve helped me a lot with both communications and not to let the mainstream dictate my vision.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

At the moment, I’m working on the first installation under “Sector M.I.” Which is currently titled “The Hanged Man’s Plan” though changes are always possible in editing. I’ve been quiet about much of the story, in previous experiences I’ve had, I’ve learned to do so, haha. What I will say is that HMP occurs 200 years prior to the main events of “Sector M.I.” It was a story I started last year, nixed, and then decided that it had more potential as it establishes the birth of a lineage with one of the main characters of SMI, King. At least right now, all of the stories will be told in relatively short books, similar to a children’s book, but with a more mature story. HMP is relatively benign compared to what I have lined up for the future editions in the series. All of the stories cover particularly controversial subjects, one of the mains in HMP suffers through a smear campaign within his own workplace, and there’s a huge focus on the destruction and outcome of jealousy as well as laying the groundwork for the world seen in “Sector M.I”

The story has undergone rights and registration along with the entirety of the Sector M.I. series so it’s a matter of completely the first story. I’ve been experiencing the ever-so-lovely world of publishing but I’ll be happy when it’s done.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Take pride in the effort you put into your work, but always be open to learn more. It’s a process first and foremost, there is no golden finish line where you’ve made it as an artist. The moment you close yourself off to growth, you’ve basically cheated yourself from the next level of your journey. It takes time, and at times it really sucks. Also, if you have an idea you believe in, don’t bend to please other people. I’ve learned that the hard way throughout my journey so far, there are literally thousands of ways to be an artist, if one idea doesn’t work, keep pushing and don’t take no for an answer when you know what you have to offer. Also process the rights to your work, haha I also learned that the hard way after experiencing content theft!

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m still asexual and aromantic, I don’t really know if that will ever change.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Yes and no. It’s not so much in my field as it has been coming out of art school. Oddly enough, most would think art school is particularly accepting of every type of person but I’ve learned the opposite. My art tends to trickle over into my daily outfits, I still work as a creative director for photo shoots from time to time, so I love to express through creating extravagant outfits, but I’ve found that with creating flamboyant outfits people tend to assume you’re an equally flamboyant person. Flamboyance has its own set of stereotypes as people assume I’m someone who goes out and dates a lot or dressing up to impress others. I’m a bit of a contradiction in that sense, how I dress is mostly because I love to create myself every day, it’s an extension of my art to me. I’ve faced the expectation to “stop being ace” because of what someone else expects or wants and it’s very uncomfortable. It’s disturbing that much of society doesn’t accept no as a valid answer when it comes to relationships (this is when “no” should be taken as an answer!).

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I would say for me that it’s a phase. Or that I’m waiting for some knight in shining armor to save me from asexuality as for me, it was never a choice. I can’t speak for every asexual but I have always been this way, though there were times in high school before I knew who I was, where I tried to date and be “normal” due to social pressures. In many communities, even in black/mixed communities, asexuality isn’t fully accepted due to the heavy stigmas black people still face. Black women tend to automatically be sexualized and stereotyped (and it’s even worse for non-binary folks, as I am as well) that it’s even harder to say I’m asexual without being laughed at or denied.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Definitely to speak up when you feel uncomfortable. If you feel like someone is pressuring you, speak up and leave the situation. You shouldn’t have to explain who you are to those who don’t get it.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

“The Hanged Man’s Plan” is still in production, so whenever all the cards are in place is when it will come out, there’s no telling how long it may take but I’ve recently be finishing the process for the rights and registration for “Sector M.I.” and Madjaw Dolls so it’s all in that awkward phase of planning to put out actual products and not just prints of works.

http://madjawdolls.com/
https://www.instagram.com/madjawdolls/
https://www.facebook.com/Madjawdollsmjd/
https://twitter.com/MadjawDolls

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Thank you, Jai, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Berrien Lucius

Today we’re joined by Berrien Lucius. Berrien is a phenomenal digital artist who specializes in digital illustration. Their art is beautiful, brimming with emotion and color, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

a-great-mom
A Great Mom

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do digital illustrations. Sometimes I just sketch, and sometimes I paint.

What inspires you?

Stories inspire me greatly. Usually, it’s passion in the story, of any kind. Either great love for friends, a romantic interest, or utter loathing for an enemy. Sometimes it’s the journey itself, or, more subtle things, like just the mood presented in a scene. In any case, stories have always been my number one inspiration.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I was diagnosed with a severe speech impediment when I was only two, and growing up, unable to speak in a way anyone could understand me, I would draw to communicate. I got praised on it so much, I decided I wanted to be an artist when I grew up.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

No, but I’ve recently decided to try to get in the habit of signing my works.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Being born with a natural duck-to-water ability to create art, whatever your art is, does not mean you will be automatically successful. Sometimes, people with no natural born skill at art can succeed far above you, just through sheer hard work. Talent can only get you so far. You have to put in the hard work if you want to be any bit successful. You’ve got to learn how to keep at it. So even if you feel like you can’t draw, or whatever the type of art you want to get into is, then don’t despair. You’re super likely to get good if you just work at it. I believe in you.

Also, for those who are sketchers and painters and the like, your eyes are always more skilled than your hands. This means, when you look at your art, it will usually always look bad in some ways. This isn’t because you’re a bad artist, this is just because you’re getting better, and your eyes are getting better, and they’re seeing the flaws. The flaws that your hand can’t make up for but your eyes see. If you’re seeing flaws in your art, that’s a good thing. That means you’re improving.

dazed
Dazed

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve handled a good bit of it! For any kind of scary encounter, I don’t really know how to handle it, and instead try to laugh it off and avoid it entirely. When it comes to just the mean kind or something, I do my best to be an informant. I feel like it’s my duty to inform people of how that was wrong or hurtful, and hope they don’t continue to be jerks. If they do, then I just ignore them from then on as best as I can.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Oh easily that it’s “not real”.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s chill, my dude. You don’t have to figure everything out at once. It can be hard, with all the new vocab you’ll be learning, being in a religious family, being religious yourself, the way the larger LGBT+ community treats you, how you may get treated at work or school for it, but chin up. You are definitely not alone, and there are so many people who are willing to help you figure out your asexuality, or help you deal with bullies and other harrassers. You’re not wrong for being the way you are. You’re amazing and wonderful the way you are. If one day you think that maybe you’re not asexual anymore, then that’s cool too. You’re okay. No pressure. Take your time and you can get through these hurdles patiently.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

In advance, thank you for checking out my art!

asexualmew.tumblr.com/tagged/my-art

Thank you, Berrien, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jasmin Dreyer

Today we’re joined by Jasmin Dreyer. Jasmin is a fantastic freelance illustrator from Germany who does a lot of children’s animation and games. She hopes to draw a webcomic some day. Judging by her art, that would be an amazing venture. Jasmine is a great artist with an amazing eye for detail and color, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

jasmin_dreyer_beast
Beast

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a freelance digital illustrator, currently working mostly for children’s animation. So far I have mostly worked for animation and small game projects. I am also working on a bachelor’s degree for illustration right now.

A dream I have for the future is to maybe someday draw my own webcomic. We’ll see about that heh…

What inspires you?

Oh so many things. Mythology, animation, children’s books, trashy scifi movies, comics, cool fashion, just pop culture in general. The list goes on and on!

A lot of influences also come from the cool people I study with at my university. It is really nice to be surrounded by so many incredible artists with so many completely different styles.

jasmin_dreyer_hedonism
Hedonism

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have actually been drawing as long as I can remember. When I was little I was pretty obsessed with drawing all kinds of animals and my MLP toys! I was also super into Disney and other animation movies and cartoons and I guess I already had some vague idea that I wanted to do something like that.

I never stopped drawing, but for a long time I just didn’t think I was good enough for art school. So right after school, I actually started studying jazz/pop music to become a professional musician but I quickly realized that that just wasn’t for me at ALL.

After that I went to university for comparative religious studies and anthropology for a semester, which was, well … interesting but also not what I wanted to do really.

So somehow after all these detours, I finally worked up the courage to get a portfolio together and apply to art school.

jasmin_dreyer_maxwell
Maxwell

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nothing like symbols, no. I do tend to use a lot of the same colours or colour combinations though.

Working in the media, I am very aware of the way women, POC, MOGAI/LGBTQIAP+ people are stereotypically portrayed (if they are portrayed at all!), especially in the games industry.

Since I almost always draw female or femme characters, I always try to give them some sort of agency of their own, if that makes sense. Like they don’t exist as mere objects to please a male gaze but for their own sake. I know I am still not perfect in this, but I also try to always challenge myself in avoiding “same face” syndrome and to try and make my characters more diverse.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I know it’s easier said than done (and sounds cliché) but still: never give up. As you can see, it took me a long time to finally decide to pursue art professionally.

I personally think that talent is pretty overrated. Talent will only get you so far. Really one of the most valuable things I learned in art school is to be persistent and passionate about your art. Find something that you are REALLY interested in, a medium, a topic (I think this can also be applied to virtually any kind of art). Something you can spend hours and hours doing. Because if you have something like that, you will inevitably get better at it! And ultimately, I think people can always see if an artist is really enthusiastic about their work and will resonate more with it.

Use reference if you need it, it’s OK, we all do it. Don’t be afraid to copy art that you like for study purposes. But when you work on your own stuff, don’t try to blindly copy trends. Try and analyze why and what exactly you like so much about it and then try to translate those elements into your own style.

Knowing your fundamentals like anatomy, composition etc. is great but also know that you don’t have to be able to draw perfect realistic pictures if you want to be an artist. There are professional illustrators for example who don’t care a bit about exact anatomy but the pictures still “work”. Maybe you are more interested in telling a story or making people laugh with your art? Just find out what works for you.

jasmin_dreyer_sigils
Sigils

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I usually just identify as ace. I am probably somewhere on the aro spectrum as well, but who knows? Sometimes I just use queer when I don’t want to actually explain asexuality.

I do think it is great that we have such specific language and microlabels to describe ourselves and our experience nowadays. I just found that I personally tend to identify with too many labels at once (sometimes even contradicting ones) and get overwhelmed in trying to parse them out. So, for now, I have found it more useful to just use broader terms.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not in my current field luckily.

When I was still doing a lot of music and theatre though, I always felt very alienated. Everything was so incredibly centered around romance and sexuality. Like 99% of the songs probably and even stage directions I was getting. I could barely relate to anything at all. I still love singing and performing etc. but that was probably one of the main reasons I had to quit most of it sadly.

jasmin_dreyer_teamwork
Teamwork

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably that aces are cold, unfeeling and not passionate about anything. This is mostly about media representation, but I think a lot of people still don’t understand how important that is. I know that it is getting better right now. But it also still hurts a lot when you only get to choose between robots or serial killers, as far as ace representation in mainstream pop culture goes.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I would say that your experiences and what you are feeling are perfectly valid. That only you get to decide what you are feeling. That you are allowed to feel good about yourself and have pride in your orientation. Know that you don’t have to change, for anything or anybody. That you are not broken or abnormal.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find my artblog here: http://eulenstadt.tumblr.com/
Or my personal blog: http://theimpossumblepossum.tumblr.com/
(mostly just inspiration/fandom stuff)

And I just started posting on Instagram too: https://www.instagram.com/jasmindreyer/

jasmin_dreyer_halloween
Halloween

Thank you, Jasmin, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Red

Today we’re joined by Red. Red is a fantastic YouTuber and a digital illustrator. Her YouTube channel is called “Overly Sarcastic Productions” and according to the channel, is dedicated to “sarcastic, yet informative, summaries of classic and not-so-classic literature and mythology, as well as major historical events!” Who isn’t interested in that? Aside from the YouTube channel, Red is also a dedicated visual artist who draws some truly adorable characters, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

a-very-asgardian-christmas
A Very Asgardian Christmas

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a YouTuber with plans! My art is mostly digital illustration and comics, but I also write, sing, and am trying to get into voice acting. My channel is separate from most of the other visual art I do, which is mostly sketchwork, comics and illustrations for the worlds I’m writing in at the moment – currently my focus in that dimension is fantasy, but I’m planning on branching out. My YouTube channel is devoted to education, and is an attempt on my part to make stories and texts typically considered “boring” interesting for an audience with my attention span – that is to say, short. It’s also great practice for voice acting, sound design and music, and the number of frames I have to draw for a single video also means I get in a ton of linework and painting practice. I’m currently focusing on improving my digital painting and my voicework, and am planning on starting a webcomic if I ever find the time.

What inspires you?

Mostly other people’s art, heh. It drives me to improve my own work and experiment in new directions. Also cartoons! It’s a great way to learn and absorb a lot of voice-acting.

jttw
Jttw

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Both my parents are artists – my dad is a writer, and my mom is a painter – so yeah, I’ve pretty much always wanted to do art in general. The voice acting specifically, though – I can’t remember what specifically got me interested in it, but it’s definitely a more recent development.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nope

mermaid
Mermaid

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Practice, practice, practice. It’s the only way to improve. Look at other people’s art in terms of what it can teach you, not how much better or worse it is than your own. Don’t be afraid to try new things, and REALLY don’t be afraid to mess up.

And remember – perfection doesn’t exist. Your work will never be perfect, and that’s okay! Just strive to improve, and realize that improving doesn’t mean you were bad before you got better!

powerhouse-recolor-copy
Powerhouse

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual, but pretty solidly romantic. Recently I’ve started questioning exactly what my romantic orientation is; currently I’m sticking with “panromantic” as it seems closest.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Er, not really? The closest I’ve gotten is the occasional plant joke.

shard
Shard

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it means you don’t want a relationship. It’s a little rough being written off as a non-viable partner just because you’re neutral on the subject of sex. I’m not a robot, I just like cuddling!

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t be afraid to get it wrong. I went through a lot of labels before I clicked with “asexual” and am currently trying to settle on a romantic one – there’s nothing wrong with saying “I’m not sure yet!” or even “I’m picking a new one!”

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The Crew

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My YouTube channel is my biggest endeavor right now, so by all means check it out! It’s called Overly Sarcastic Productions (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCodbH5mUeF-m_BsNueRDjcw), and most of it is summaries/retellings of old books and myths.

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The Tempest

Thank you, Red, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Luna Tiny

Today we’re joined by Luna Tiny. Luna is an amazing visual artist who writes a comic entitled Anonymous Asexual. It’s about the trials and tribulations of being queer and it’s really freaking cool. I highly recommend checking it out. Luna also does other sorts of visual art such as character and creature design. It’s very apparent they’re incredibly passionate about their art and it shows, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

anonymous artist
Anonymous Artist

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a digital illustrator primarily, and mostly create comics, fanart, and creature/character designs. Most of my work, particularly my comics, focus on issues of gender identity and sexuality.

What inspires you?

Personal experiences from my life.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve wanted to be an artist from a very young age, but digital art came to me after watching speed paintings on YouTube. I didn’t realize what I specifically wanted to do, illustration, until much more recently through schooling.

final image

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I almost always include my signature somewhere in my art.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Never give up trying to make art- no matter how hard it may seem, anyone can learn from it and be inspired to create. Follow and make what you love, regardless of what others think about it, and you’ll go far as an artist.

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Girlfriend, Girlfriend

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a sex-repulsed asexual, but I also identify as panromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have; people often question how I can be in a relationship if I am unwilling to have sex, or that I just “haven’t found the right person” to have sex with. I’ve received hate for how I identify, particularly as anonymous messages online, and have been rejected as a possible romantic interest because of my orientation. I handle these comments calmly and try to respond by educating the person insulting me to the best of my ability. It doesn’t always work, but I find it’s more effective than losing my cool.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“You can’t be in a romantic relationship without having sex”

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s OK to be confused about it, and it’s OK to not be sexually attracted towards anyone; your identity is what you make of it, and you shouldn’t let other people try to convince you that you are someone you’re not.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find me at anonymous-asexual.tumblr.com, where I have links to a few of my other blogs as well. Just look up Luna Tiny, and you should find me pretty easily!

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Poses

Thank you, Luna, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.