Interview: Nikki

Today we’re joined by Nikki. Nikki is a wonderful fanartist who does digital art and is an avid cosplayer. She mostly sells digital art at conventions, where she also shows off her incredible cosplays. It’s clear she’s a dedicated artist who loves what she does. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

2

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a digital artist & cosplayer!  I sell fanart at cons, do commission work, and, well, build cosplays!

What inspires you?

For my cosplay, characters who I see part of myself in inspire me the most.  Strong women, mostly.  I’ve also just made cosplays because the character design/execution in the original media look cool.

For art, I find that real somber, sad scenes inspire me.  I’m not entirely sure the reasoning, but it resonates with me more than happy, cheerful stuff.

3. by Daily Bugle Photogrophy
by Daily Bugle Photogrophy

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been interested in art of any form, but I don’t think I actively wanted to be an artist until around 2 or 3 years ago.  I also didn’t know I wanted to seriously do cosplaying until maybe a year ago!  As for what got me interested in cosplaying, I think it’d have to be the utter confidence being in costume gives me.  I love putting in hours and days of work into a cosplay, putting it on, and showing the world what I made with my own two hands!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not that I can really think of!  I do have a little trinket given to me by Guerrilla Games, the company who made Horizon Zero Dawn that I wear when I cosplay from the game!  I also have a bracelet my best friend gave me that matches the aesthetic of the game that I wear, too!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Very cliched, but keep practicing!  Nothing has to be perfect, in art, cosplay, really anything, so don’t stress the small details.  That, and, if you put your heart and soul into your work, it will show, no matter your skill level.

4. by Final Eva Productions
by Final Eva Productions

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am fully Asexual, and most likely greyromantic, but I’m not sure about that.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not that I’ve seen, but you never know what people say when you’re not there.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I think the most common misconception that I see is that it’s about libido or interest in sex, which isn’t the case.  Just like there can be allosexuals can be uninterested in sex or have a low libido, an asexual can have interest in sex and/or a high libido.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

First and foremost, whether you’re asexual or not, that doesn’t change who you are.  If you feel comfortable identifying as ace, that’s wonderful!  If you don’t, you don’t have to! Maybe it will just take some getting used to, or maybe the label just isn’t what you’re feeling, and that’s perfectly okay.  No one else can decide who you are, only you can. All I can hope for is that you love yourself.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Anyone who is interested can find me on Tumblr and Instagram at AceArtCosplay, and on Facebook at Ace Art & Cosplay.  I try to post updates as much as I can, but it doesn’t always happen.

1

Thank you, Nikki, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jess Renae Curtis

Today we’re joined by Jess Renae Curtis, who also goes by Jess or Pup. Jess is the phenomenal artist behind PuppyLuver Studios. She does mostly fan work at the moment but has also recently branched out into original work. She is currently dabbling with creating an original universe. Jess is mostly a digital artist and creates both fanart and original characters through drawing. Her work is bright and colorful, capturing the viewer and drawing them in. It shows an amazing attention to detail. It’s clear she’s an extraordinarily talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. owl barber
Owl Barber

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m both a writer and a digital artist. My illustrations are generally focused on characters, both original designs and those from fandoms I’m involved in, and tend to use a lot of varied color. My writing is involved in both fanfiction (notable ones I’m working on at the moment include Chronicles of Tajiria, a Pokémon series but with the Pokémon as people with superpowers/magic, and Sonata in Triplicate, a Legend of Zelda AU series) and my original series Theia Historica, of which I have the first entry (titled A Kingdom of Children) published.

What inspires you?

I don’t really have a definite answer for that, it could be just about anything depending on what sort of thing or things it ends up inspiring. I’ve had small one-page comics based on something funny that happened to me while playing a video game, I’ve designed a character because a YouTuber I follow posted a video of himself shaving his beard with a razor that I initially thought looked like an owl, I’ve drawn pieces based on something funny a friend said to me, lots of things. In fact, the general art direction of Theia Historica has its roots in one very specific part in the PS2 role-playing game Okage: Shadow King, but it’s a long explanation so that’s a story for another time.

2. mermaids working out
Mermaids Working Out

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing ever since I was a little kid, and while I always liked drawing it wasn’t what I wanted to do with my life for the longest time. Funnily enough, my first career choices were astronaut and veterinarian, before I realized that the things in space kinda scared me and I was squeamish about blood and other bodily fluids, so around middle school I decided to try a career path that I already had some skill and comfort in. I started storytelling shortly after becoming literate, though unlike visual art that was always something I could see myself doing professionally, though more as an “after I’m done being an astrovet” thing than as part of my main career.

3. brunswick manor front
Brunswick Manor front

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Can’t think of anything in particular except for the star that I use as my watermark (a five-point star with each point being a different color of the rainbow except for orange). Also in major writing projects I tend to find some way or another to put myself in there. Just…self-insert in the background, there I am.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you’re feeling discouraged about your skill level, remember to keep trying and that you can only get better. You’ve got wonderful visions that’ve been concocted solely by the processes of your imagination, and only you can bring them to life for the world to see. Also, don’t pay attention to what cringe culture says. Make that multicolor Sonic OC if you want. Write a short story about you getting transported to your favorite fictional world and becoming best buds with the main characters if doing so cheers you up when you’re feeling down. Don’t let anyone stop you from enjoying something that makes you happy and doesn’t hurt others.

4. journey-traveler's hub
Journey-Traveler’s Hub

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a sex-repulsed asexual. I’m not entirely sure yet of where I fall in regards to romantic attraction, but if I were to try dating I think I’d want my first attempts at romantic experiences to be with women.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not specifically in my field, no, and I don’t really know how I would handle it if I were to encounter prejudice that was physical or coming from a position of authority. Most people I’ve told about my asexuality are a bit confused as to what it means at first, but once I explain they’re generally supportive. I have had encounters with people who flat-out refused to believe that I was an adult who didn’t enjoy sex and couldn’t ever imagine doing so, but that one was on me for commenting on a video explicitly titled “Why Does Sex Feel Good?” and saying that I couldn’t understand why sex-havers craved it so strongly (I mean, I technically can, cuz if sex weren’t at least somewhat pleasurable to those willingly engaging in it then the species would die out because then no one would be boinking and possibly making babies) and I thought the whole societal obsession with it was a bit ridiculous. I kinda walked into that one, and I ended up just muting that conversation and moving on.

5. skull kid and deku tree
Skull Kid and Deku Tree

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

If they don’t outright dismiss the possibility of asexuality/aromanticism existing, they tend to assume all asexual people share my feelings in that sex is something they wish to avoid. While I am not one of them, there are obviously plenty of asexuals who either are indifferent or even enjoy sex as an activity. I’m put off by all the mess that I’ve heard results from a typical sexual encounter to even consider trying it, but I will never knock on any sex-positive or sex-neutral aces.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Not having a sexual or romantic attraction is just as normal as having a sexual or romantic attraction to people of a different gender, the same gender, or multiple genders. You’re not broken just because all your peers are ogling “sexy” celebrities and you find yourself feeling indifferent to the whole thing. And don’t listen to all the highly vocal exclusionists plaguing the internet that say a-spec people don’t belong. They are the minority given megaphones, and the majority of LGBT groups and spaces are inclusive of a-specs.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find my stuff on DeviantART under the username PuppyLuver, and on Tumblr, Twitter, FanFiction.net, and AO3 under the username PuppyLuver256. I also have a Redbubble store and a Patreon.

6. shiny mahina
Shiny Mahina

Thank you, Jess, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Meg

Today we’re joined by Meg. Meg is a phenomenal visual artist who specializes in photo manipulation and book cover design. Her work is gorgeous, showing a keen eye for detail and a vivid imagination. It’s clear she’s an artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I mostly do digital art with the program Photoshop CC. The majority of things that I make fall under the categories of photomanipulation and book cover design. I’ve been practicing doing digital art for five years now and I hope to continue in the future.

What inspires you?

Anything and everything. Sometimes I’ll be out walking on the street with my family and I’ll stop to take a picture of a design that I particularly like. They will confirm this.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was younger, I wanted to be the type of artist who did paintings and the like. Does that count? Of course, I realized I couldn’t draw for shit, so, you know, digital art. But yeah, I’ve always kind of wanted to do some kind of art.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I wish. I will say that the majority of my work includes the color blue as it has been a long time favorite of mine.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

As Dory says, ‘Just keep swimming.’ Don’t give up just because you see someone that you think is way better than you, or because you think that you aren’t good enough. It may sound cliché, but nobody starts off any art as Michelangelo. On that note, try not to be too harsh on your own work, something I’m frequently guilty of myself. Whoops.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

So, so, so asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Actually, I have not experienced a lot of prejudice in my field, and I’m very thankful for that.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuals don’t have dirty minds. Oh my god, so not true. Speaking from personal experience.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s not ‘weird’ or ‘strange’ to be asexual. It is what it is.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I actually have a website! (Finally): pantographics.wixsite.com/pantographicdesigns

And an Instagram: at pantographics.

Thank you, Meg, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Ellen

Today we’re joined by Ellen. Ellen is a phenomenal freelance artist who does both traditional and digital art. She loves to draw and specializes in both cartoons and realism. Her work has an incredible vividness to it and demonstrates a masterful use of color. She’s a talented and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

pride part 2
Pride

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art is a combination of cartoons and realism. I have been developing my art for 8 years. I love to draw humans, animals or mythical creatures. I use drawing as an escape from the hardships that I face, when the pencil touches the paper or when my stylus touches the tablet, I enter a world where I can express myself without being judged for who I am. In some ways art can be very therapeutic, whether it’s because of school or life in general, I pick up the pencil and doodle away……until the lead snaps or the battery dies on my stylus.

What inspires you?

My friends, they have inspired me and stood by my side through thick and thin. They have supported me for the longest time and they’re the reason I’m still drawing! My dad is also my biggest inspiration, he has supported and inspired for many years. I remember when he would put up my pictures on the fridge when I was in preschool.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I started drawing in 1st grade. I would just draw the usual stick figures with noodle hair. But, one specific person kick started my love for art. When I was in 4th grade, this one girl taught me how to draw humans in a way that looked like a human it didn’t have all those advanced features that an actual human had. Ever since then I started to develop that style into what it is today. I never thought that I would ever become an artist but, look at me now!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Whenever I draw my main human character, I draw this little curl on the top of their head. This trait came from my love of anime as a child and it carried through my style for as long as I can remember. Also I draw the tips of shoes/feet very pointy.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Always take constructive criticism! It will help you in the future when you want to become professional!

two time
Two Time

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Biromantic Asexual 🙂 but I’m still contemplating if I really like boys or not

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Unfortunately, yes. Sometimes I’m really scared to go to a pride event because I’m scared that I will receive backlash due to my orientation. And I have been told constantly that “It’s just a phase, you’ll grow out of it” or “You don’t belong here because you’re basically straight!” Every time I make something pride related and I don’t add the lesbian flag or if I add the ace flag, I will get attacked by other artists who will flood the comment section saying that I’m homophobic for not adding the lesbian flag or that asexuality doesn’t exist and that I should remove it, and that really hurts my self-esteem. I try to ignore it and move on.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re all just whiny virgins who can’t get laid or that we are just “innocent space beans uwu.” another thing that I’ve encountered is that all asexuals are sex-repulsed, some asexuals can have dirty minds or they can view that kind of material, it’s all up to them what they do. If you’re sex-repulsed, that’s fine, but all of us are different.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are not alone, trust me. I was having trouble with my orientation when I was figuring out where I belonged in this community. You are valid! Don’t let anyone tell you that you are not, you are a part of this community and you matter! We are one huge asexual family.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can follow me on:

Deviantart: https://www.deviantart.com/datshinyzoroark
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/datshinyzoroark/

Thank you, Ellen, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Chip

Today we’re joined by Chip. Chip is a phenomenal visual artist and fanartist who uses both traditional and digital media. While she mostly does fanart, she’s hoping to do more original work. Though art is a hobby, her drawings show an extraordinary attention to detail and a vividness that is truly amazing. The use of bright colors draws in the viewer. It’s clear she’s an artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. PicsArt_03-23-11.25.12

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I always loved arts and crafts of all sorts but I usually share drawings on my blog (both traditional and digital). I tend to make more fan art than original but I wish to change that in the future

What inspires you?

Other artists mostly. I take my inspiration from Tumblr, Tapas and Webtoon. I love the way they show their personality in their work.

2. PicsArt_07-29-09.49.21

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My earliest memories are of my mum painting with watercolors. She used art as a way of self-healing and reflection and I always watched. I think I’m trying to do the same now.

Also one of my favorite memories is when my primary school invited Nicoletta Costa to talk with us about how she wrote and illustrated her kids books (which I adored)

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I think I’m too young of an artist as of right now 😉 stay tuned to find out

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I’d tell myself to try out and practice the new stuff as I learn it

To not buy beautiful sketchbooks I’m too afraid to ruin (get really ugly ones for practice)

To take a picture/scan/make a copy before you color in the lineart so you don’t have to worry about ruining it

3. 20171118_181905

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I fit in the spectrum and I don’t wish for a more specific label. I used to think I HAD to find my super specific custom “term” to be valid but I realized it’s just not the case. For some people it’s important but I’m happy with just knowing the direction I’m going instead of the coordinates y’know?

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I keep myself away from the discourse online and I’m only out to 2 friends irl so I haven’t faced any hardship. I do feel somewhat invisible and unwelcome in both worlds at times but I’d say my insecurities are the only “prejudice” I faced so far.

When I’m lonely I come back to this blog

When I feel unlovable I remind myself it’s a lie and when I feel like too much of a snowflake I tell myself that everybody is one

4. PicsArt_05-02-11.44.35

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re prudes (not true), that nobody will date us without sex (also not true) and that we’re just trying to hop on the “queer train” one way or the other (…no)

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

No experience is like the other. Do your research, listen to as many stories as you can and then just step back for a minute. You don’t have to figure it all now. Go for what feels right and allow yourself to change

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find me on both Tumblr and DeviantArt at c0uchpotatochip! Feel free to tag along

5. 20180724_102714

Thank you, Chip, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: goatbunny

Today we’re joined by goatbunny. goatbunny is a phenomenal visual artist who works in a number of different mediums, both traditional and digital. goatbunny has done shows in the past and has a number of different projects they’re currently working on, including creating her own Tarot Deck. It’s clear she’s a passionate and driven artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

2. HammerTPIG
Hammer

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I paint and draw using both traditional (pencil, ink, watercolor and illustration marker are my main tools, but I also use gouache, acrylic, spray paint, crayons, and pretty much anything else I find) and digital media (I’ve recently gotten back into digital media so I’ve been exploring more of that). I dabble in almost everything else, I’ll try anything once. I’ve sculpted in the past, and I sew a lot when I don’t really feel like drawing or painting, by hand and with a machine. I am currently creating my own Tarot Deck and collaborating with a fellow artist on a card game, activity/coloring books and I have started to experiment more with non-traditional styles of animation with him using “2-D” type of puppets using cardboard and even felt. I have recently created my second short film.

What inspires you?

I try to gain inspiration from everything around me. I try not to focus too much on other visual artists like myself as I try to avoid the trap of having other drawing styles impacting my own too heavily. I am very inspired by music, films, books, etc. I just try to be as observant as possible. Meeting up with other creatives also helps a lot. I have a lot of musicians and artists, and a couple of writers in my friend circle so I like to think we inspire each other.

3. llamacorn wm
Llamacorn

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve pretty much been drawing and creating since I was able to hold a pencil in my hand. I have always loved cartoons, comics, animated film and even videogames and had always wanted to be an animator, cartoonist, illustrator or character designer when I was younger. I HAVE always wanted to be in a creative field, even if I was steered in other directions. Even when I was studying the sciences in school or during my short career in the medical field, I never stopped drawing and now I can finally say that art is what I do full time.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I can’t say that I really have a unique signature, aside from signing “Goat” when I do remember to sign my pieces. Lately I have been watermarking any pieces I have posted publicly online, and have also been incorporating my Goatagram logo in digital work (It’s basically a pentagram with a goatbunny head – a bunny with goat horns).

1. RETRO GOATAGRAM NOBGig
Retro Goatagram Nob

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just keep creating. Even if you don’t end up being a full-time artist, always make time for art. It’s not the easiest career choice. I’m 35 and have only been a full-time artist for the past 3 years, so I can feel the difference, financially. I almost want to say my parents were right and that you should find a steady, well-paying job but to be honest, I traded said job for the sake of my mental health and I can say that, for the most part, it was worth it.

If you do choose art as a career, you may feel discouraged. You may feel like you want to quit. You may even become disgruntled about what you see in the art world. It’s important to remember why you create and why it’s important to YOU. It also helps to have a close, supportive network to help you through any of the rough patches you may hit.

4. vidscreen
Vidscreen

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I feel like I discovered asexuality waaaaay late in the game (early-30s) so I found it really difficult to figure out where I fall in the spectrum. In retrospect, I feel like I could be a grey-ace but it’s hard to really tell what I really felt and what I thought I SHOULD feel. So I generally just use the more general asexual term because I am at least certain about that.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

It’s hard to say as I tend to keep my personal life out of my work for the most part. My city has a large LGBTQ+ community, and a large arts community and they both overlap. I have been invited to fairs run by queer artists through a mutual friend but I feel like ace representation wasn’t strong on there at all. The community feels very overtly sex favorable, and most art is very inundated with social commentary, especially about sexuality, gender and orientation. It even felt like there was even a certain “dress code”. Since my art doesn’t have any specific themes about gender or sexuality, didn’t “look” like them, and am cis in relationship with someone of the opposite sex, I didn’t feel very welcome. Not to say that I wasn’t, but I didn’t feel very included by some of the merchants/organizers. I’m not entirely sure if that counts, but it felt like if I didn’t openly express my sexuality or orientation, I don’t really count or am truly accepted. I tend to not let situations like that get to me since I want people to relate to and judge my art, not who I am.

5. DSC_1697_1507070092659

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Of the few people I came out to and had to explain it, the main misconception was basically that I just don’t like sex. In the case of my husband before we were married, he thought it meant that I didn’t/couldn’t love him or didn’t want to have sex with him. After having explained it a few times, he finally understood that I am capable of love, but sexual attraction is something I don’t experience. I’ve come to realize that for a lot of people, it is very difficult to separate sexual attraction, romantic attraction, love and the act of sex itself.

6. Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 3.19.43 AM

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

That one’s tough, since I feel like I’m still learning a lot about my own every day. I guess: Keep reading up on it. Do some introspection. Be open to what you learn. Accept the fact that your orientation may change. Just learn to accept who you and what you’re going through at the moment. Finding community among others who accept and support who you are and what you are experiencing will also help, whether it’s in real life or online.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is http://www.church-of-goatbunny.tumblr.com/
And Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/churchofgoatbunny/, but it’s mostly just posts shared from my Instagram: at winner.gets.a.rake.
I do have a Patreon which is a huge help for self-employed artists: https://www.patreon.com/goatbunny
Work can be purchased directly through me or my Big Cartel shop: https://churchofgoatbunny.bigcartel.com/

7. Tarot 17 Scholar
Tarot 17 Scholar

Thank you, goatbunny, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Lucy Cyclone

Today we’re joined by Lucy Cyclone. Lucy is a wonderful visual artist and fanartist. She mostly uses digital mediums although she also dabbles in traditional ones as well. Lucy enjoys drawing comics and animations, which allows her to convey more emotions in her work. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and passionate artist with a lot of enthusiasm, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. mediccu

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I draw mostly digitally nowadays, rarely finishing sketches I do on paper. I like to tell stories with my drawings, and am very attracted to comics and animation, as those can convey a lot of feelings more efficiently than a single picture.

Externally I live to learn and can appear sturdy, while art is my vent of things I don’t trust to show in company as well as sources of enjoyment I can’t possibly show any other way.

I also suffer from the very common Can’t Draw Properly With A Tablet 2 At Pm But Definitely Will Make A Realistic Portrait At Midnight With A Ball Point On Lined Notebook Paper syndrome.

2. mybabtt

What inspires you?

Music, random ideas, other fanwork and personal thoughts. My biggest muse would be sitting up late while staring at the ceiling, and Sleeping at Last’s music. Currently really into Transformers comics and Boku no Hero Academia as well.

Once I get a good idea it tends to completely overwhelm me. I don’t finish a lot of them because I always find myself caught up in something else before I do. It takes a while for me to set foot on solid ground and decide that I want and I will do something.

4. 1c

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Currently – art is a hobby. I drew while young but only took it seriously around two years ago, when I started practicing more often. When I was 12 I got dragged into cartoons – most notably My Little Pony at the time – and I suddenly wanted to create more and more visions of fictional worlds – and create my own.

My appreciation for animation and expression grew from thereon. I still struggle with some human anatomy aspects (legs-) but overall I’ve come a really long way in the past years.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I settle on having my signature being legible. With style being the subject, I prefer to pander to natural proportions as much as I am able to. Big fan of Disney and western styles, and while I do refrain from anime and chibi, I do try to replicate the styles of eastern animation work I enjoy.

Even though chibi is always a go-to when I am tired and just want to draw something cute.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t take criticism personally, tracing is superb as long as you credit the original, and studies of photos do miracles

Also don’t be like me and spend 3 years of your life drawing almost exclusively cartoon horses. Ultimately it helps with general quadriped anatomy but… just don’t.

3. pinkd

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Ace and Bi – I prefer not to directly use SAM unless someone insists.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Luckily, no so far! Asexuality isn’t widely known (which I personally don’t mind) and I like to be hopeful enough to dare to say a lot of the young generation in the connected world doesn’t really care about which way one swings. We’ve come a long way!

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Being somewhat young, I can understand people suggesting it is just a phase, and I accept that as a possibility, but I notice that a lot of other aces experience this as well. Whether or not it is a phase, if the shoe fits I’ll wear it.

5. egge

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay not to know and never okay to hurry! Take some time to know yourself, it’s a very long way and ultimately has meaning only to you, but can still affect others, so keep your head cool. Reason is the best road.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

On Tumblr, I post my work at lucy-cyclone, and I try to post at least once per week. I plan to reboot my DeviantArt soon, though this is enough for now.

6. ljhgv

Thank you, Lucy, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.