Interview: Robin Luigi

Today we’re joined by Robin Luigi. Robin is a wonderful visual artist from New Zealand. He’s currently studying in art school. Robin does both traditional and digital art. It’s clear he’s a dedicated and passionate artist with a bright future ahead of him, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Art-Selfie

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

So, I’m a Visual Arts student and I make art that ranges from: Traditional illustrations and Paintings to Digital works. I try to include LGBTQIA+ themes and content when I can.

What inspires you?

I get inspiration from a range of different sources, most often from something I see in the world. I have a fondness for colour theory and I usually get inspiration from a colour I see. Sometimes it can be a number of colours and I use them as a starting point for the tone of my work. One of my favourite places to get inspiration is from the people in my life (be it in person, or over the internet via selfies or photos) and if I meet a new friend, making art of this person helps me to understand them better.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always enjoyed making things with my hands and because I find it a lot easier to draw/illustrate things, than I do with writing/calculating things and that became quite obvious to me, that this was where my strength was.

Having said that, I never really considered myself as an Artist and, though I guess there isn’t really a better description than that, I don’t always considered myself as one. I like the term Art Student as I identify with the idea that I am always learning about bigger and better things. Often, when I refer to myself as an artist it’s only because most people know the context of my ideas and interests.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t think I do? If I do, I don’t do it consciously or intentionally. I really like that idea however and I always admire artists that have their little mark or feature. I personally don’t have the capacity to be so consistent. Unfortunately.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Oh, man. I am not really the most eloquent person but I’ll give it a wack:

The best advice I could give would be, Go for it – unapologetically, Art is what you make it. And I don’t just mean you should be making stuff from nothing, I am saying if you see something/a concept that you think isn’t working or you can see a way to improve it, go for it, change it up. That’s an important and valid creative endeavour. Reminds me of a quote, from a great movie from my childhood:

“When something’s not working right, the best thing to do is tear it apart to make it better” – Drop Dead Fred.

Long-Day
Long Day

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a Trans-guy and I don’t experience sexual attraction/identify as asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I personally haven’t had to deal with ace prejudice or ignorance as I usually don’t disclose my sexuality to people often because I don’t view it as a major part of my life. If I did, I would assess the situation and perhaps educate whomever it was that needed to be enlightened.

Although I do make art related to sexual themes, there is a few times where I have made (in my opinion) regular pieces of work and people have given feedback about the sensual undertones, to which I apologise, or ask for further explanation. It’s not really ignorance but I felt that it was an interesting point to add because quite often, art means different things to different people and it always surprises me when people make that association.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I mentioned previously I am kind of a closet asexual to mostly everyone I know so It’s not often a topic of discussion, but I remember in high school we weren’t educated on non-heterosexual issues (this was 2009 or so) and during health class, while the teacher wasn’t in the room, we all talked about what we knew about gay and lesbian activities. Because I had previously researched into queer issues, I had to give a small talk on asexuality. Which got some comments of “that’s not a real thing” and “just means they can’t get it up” but that’s the extent of it.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

As I say, I am not the best at advice but I am going to go with:

You have all the time in the world to figure yourself out and don’t feel like you owe it to anyone else to do so. Also, if you don’t want to fit into a box at all, that’s fine too. Be yourself, Love yourself.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have an art-based Facebook page that has a lot of my work on it. I also have a Tumblr and Instagram where I post art sometimes, however, these are my personal blogs and I may also post personal things and other unrelated things. Most of the time, it’s just things I like or think is funny. Anyway, so the Facebook page is probably the most saturated place to view my art.

Thank you, Robin, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: NW

Today we’re joined by NW. NW is a phenomenal visual artist who specializes in fanart. She does mostly digital art, though she does occasionally dabbles in traditional media. NW does a lot of costume and character design. She enjoys doing mostly fanart, but will occasionally do original art. It’s clear she’s a passionate and dedicated artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

meeeeee

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

So, a lot of my work right now is done digitally — that is to say I don’t have an aversion to traditional media, it’s just more accessible to me at the moment — and usually it’s of people. Ranging from character or costume design, fan art, and a lot of my original artwork I don’t get to post. I love drawing portraits and faces, so right now, I guess the majority (that I post, anyway) is of that. I’m mostly self-taught; I’ve learned through practicing, studying classical paintings, and even watching Bob Ross as a little girl. I’ve had the traditional drawing courses (you know, still lives of apples or shapes) in addition to a lot of experimentation software like Paint Tool SAI, Adobe Photoshop, and Procreate.

I don’t particularly stick to one “style”; I don’t really like doing line art, I find it too time-consuming and I have issues with tremor, no thanks to my medication I take. So my style is very “paintery”, if you like. What I’ve learned in painting courses (and, again, Bob Ross) and I paint over my mistakes. When I do traditional media, I usually go back to the pencil or watercolors. I’m a visual person and I love coloring and colors. My favorite thing about creating art is eventually coloring it.

What inspires you?

A lot of things inspire me.

Art has been a therapeutic thing for me and I’ve gone back and added my own feelings in them. I’m very guilty of day-dreaming and since I was a kid, those day dreams inspire art. I think of stories and they become my pieces. Things I see in real life, whether it be color combinations, fashion, or images I pass, I try to hold onto that visual memory and bring it back.  Nowadays, I carry my iPad and stop to at least get it out before it goes. Movies definitely do—I hadn’t realized how much movies affected my stories and images until I got older.

Other artists most definitely do, which is why I’m Tumblr a lot. Most of the blogs I follow are other artists. There are also a few blogs that post traditional and classical artwork that I love. And, really, the music I listen to also is a huge influence on me and I always listen to certain bands and artists to try and captivate a mood in my pieces. My usernames “ofborrowedlight” and “rainbowillness” actually come from one band that I listen to a lot when I do artwork, Wolves in the Throne Room. They’re titles to two songs, “Rainbow Illness” and “Queen of the Borrowed Light”. For my personal “project”, I listen to them quite a bit.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Well, I’ve been holding a pencil since I had an Etch-a-Sketch and I cannot recall the rest. And I keep bringing up Bob Ross for a reason—I watched him religiously as a little girl. I’d say that he was actually the first influence that wanted me to get into the field. By the age of five, my mind was made up: I wanted to be an artist. I struggled with dyslexia and bullying and art was my constant companion for me. Having that man on television taught me so much about color and composition at an early age and his attitude of “there are no accidents, only happy mistakes” is such a positive thing to have and he’s really still pushing me, to this day, with that attitude. If you ask me now, yeah, I still want to draw and create for a living. It hasn’t been easy working full-time and trying to earn money, though, but I have not given up. I still try to draw every day; unfortunately, I get really shy posting stuff online or I’m spending more time on it than I wanted to.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not in particularly? At least I don’t think so; maybe my coloring?

Maybe the closest to it if anyone notices that I incorporate a wave or a flow around my figures, sometimes. That comes from how Gustav Kilmt, Alphonse Mucha, and some traditional Japanese paintings that seem to have a special way to draw smoke and water. I can’t really write it, but anyone can find it in my sketches. But flat out, there’s no real unique symbolism, usually. If there is, it’s with my original stuff with little hints, but no one is going to know context, it’s just me, because I haven’t really presented the world with that story yet. It’s an inside joke with me, I guess.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep drawing, draw as much as you can, and don’t be afraid to expand your style. I was like a lot of artists out here on Tumblr; I’d print Sailor Moon illustrations and copied them. It’s good to do that to get up on your feet, but don’t allow that to be a dependency. Don’t be afraid to get books for the sake of illustrations—I still do. And don’t feel bad about your level of technique doesn’t match your friends or other artists out there. Art is all about your interpretation. While I can go on hours how stupid still lives and contour drawing is, they are essential to getting better. Take classic courses; if they’re not accessible to you, check out Udemy or Coursea.

With digital art, it’s a lot of practice. You just need to play around with features in software and you’ll find some really cool effects to enhance your coloring. Transitioning from a sketchbook to a drawing tablet is weird and don’t feel bad about not getting it; it took me years to get it and I’m still trying to play around with it. You’ll find a favorite program that you love! And even then, I would encourage you to have more than one digital art program. I hop around Paint Tool SAI, Photoshop, and Procreate all the time.

And really, I can’t stress it enough: don’t give up. You’re in an age where more of these things are accessible to you and it wasn’t when I was a kid. Keep drawing, draw more, and draw whatever you want.

versussmall
Versus

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Heteromantic asexual but more often gray-sexual. I think men are handsome, that’s about it. I’m not bothered by it and I really don’t care about relationships. Finding a man attractive is the furthest I’ll go; I don’t want much interaction after that.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

The closest I’ve experienced any sort of misconception have been at concerts, anime, or comic conventions (surprise, I draw there too) and having to really push back men that have approached me for a date or my number. If they really can’t take the hint or accept “no” for an answer, I’ll get up and leave. A few times I’ve had men at just concerts or gatherings telling me they can “fix” me or change my mind. Then I’ll just tell them to fuck right the hell off, literally.

However, the most prejudice and ignorance I experience is outside of art and I experience it more with my family. It’s an odd mix of Irish and Mexican Catholicism where most of the women in my family married young (we’re talking 17-19) and they think there’s something wrong with me because I have no kids and I’m not married. No matter how many times I tell them “I don’t care, I don’t find anyone attractive” or “sex doesn’t interest me”, it doesn’t seem to sink in. Even when I told them there’s a community of other asexuals, one said “well, they must all be very depressed”. I make jokes about things like “this is why I don’t date” and use it to reiterate I don’t care about relationships.

So I’d say the run of the mill crap—“you haven’t found the right man”, “you’ll change your mind someday”, or “you must be very lonely”. I just shrug it off because I’ve had this conversation so many times with my family.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I’m not sure if this is common, but my father believed it was the same as bisexuality—I’m just glad he recognizes that even if I’m not!

One thing I’ve seen is people assume its celibacy and then I have to explain there is a huge difference between the two. It does get tiring having to explain it’s a lack of physical attraction and a desire for it and no, I am not going to change, I’m not worried about not being married, and I’m well over 20 years old and it’s not likely I’m having second thoughts. I am, myself, sex-repulsed, but other asexual people are not and that’s usually one assumption that people go with. Having other people chime in and say they aren’t hleps.

Unfortunately, I will say that because I struggle with PTSD from abuse, therapists assume that the asexuality may be a cause of it. I’m sure it’s a contribution, but more along the lines I just find general touch revolting, though I’m confident that it’s not the ultimate reason why I’m asexual. I feel like psychology needs to learn more about it because I am tired of that assumption is because its due to trauma. I don’t think it’s asking too much that therapists and psychiatrists learn about asexuality. We’re not all like this, not every asexual person is like that due to trauma. And this thinking let me believe that I was really, really destroyed for years when I was not.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If you also had a past of trauma like me, I’d say check out Aven and other communities geared towards asexuality so that you will know you’re not broken. I feel like this isn’t really talked about that much and it’s a shame. This isn’t part of PTSD or other forms of mental illness; you are not mentally ill if you’re asexual. When I first heard asexual at 18, I didn’t know about these things and I’m so happy other people have this access. Even now, at Pridefest here in Denver, there are asexuals and I haven’t seen them not even five years ago. My present employer, Ikea, even had “asexuality” listed on their diversity and inclusion talks—that’s really awesome.

There’s a lot of research and groups, there’s a whole world out there. But if you get the same spiel as I do, I think at this point, all we can do is just poke fun at it. Nothing makes me feel better than mocking these conceptions with other aces, it’s a nice reassurance. And if you’re in the same boat with me and family, yeah, post a link on Facebook or just print it off and be like “read this”. I don’t feel like we have the same level of resistance to people that are gay, lesbian, bi, and trans, so we need to also understand that. Watching a family member bullied out of the closet was horrific; I still couldn’t draw comparisons to their situation. Ours seems like a lot of people just can’t comprehend a life without physical attraction, I think. I just hope people remember that, especially.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Most of my stuff is posted on Rainbowillness.com, which is hooked up to Tumblr. If you’re in the American McGee’s Alice fandom, you know me, I’m sure you’ve seen my stuff. I’m also on Instagram under “ofborrowedlight”; sometimes I will post WIPs (works in progress) on my personal Tumblr, “ofborrowedlight”, but I urge everyone just go on my site and follow me there.

Thank you, NW, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Nikki

Today we’re joined by Nikki. Nikki is a wonderful fanartist who does digital art and is an avid cosplayer. She mostly sells digital art at conventions, where she also shows off her incredible cosplays. It’s clear she’s a dedicated artist who loves what she does. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a digital artist & cosplayer!  I sell fanart at cons, do commission work, and, well, build cosplays!

What inspires you?

For my cosplay, characters who I see part of myself in inspire me the most.  Strong women, mostly.  I’ve also just made cosplays because the character design/execution in the original media look cool.

For art, I find that real somber, sad scenes inspire me.  I’m not entirely sure the reasoning, but it resonates with me more than happy, cheerful stuff.

3. by Daily Bugle Photogrophy
by Daily Bugle Photogrophy

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been interested in art of any form, but I don’t think I actively wanted to be an artist until around 2 or 3 years ago.  I also didn’t know I wanted to seriously do cosplaying until maybe a year ago!  As for what got me interested in cosplaying, I think it’d have to be the utter confidence being in costume gives me.  I love putting in hours and days of work into a cosplay, putting it on, and showing the world what I made with my own two hands!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not that I can really think of!  I do have a little trinket given to me by Guerrilla Games, the company who made Horizon Zero Dawn that I wear when I cosplay from the game!  I also have a bracelet my best friend gave me that matches the aesthetic of the game that I wear, too!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Very cliched, but keep practicing!  Nothing has to be perfect, in art, cosplay, really anything, so don’t stress the small details.  That, and, if you put your heart and soul into your work, it will show, no matter your skill level.

4. by Final Eva Productions
by Final Eva Productions

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am fully Asexual, and most likely greyromantic, but I’m not sure about that.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not that I’ve seen, but you never know what people say when you’re not there.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I think the most common misconception that I see is that it’s about libido or interest in sex, which isn’t the case.  Just like there can be allosexuals can be uninterested in sex or have a low libido, an asexual can have interest in sex and/or a high libido.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

First and foremost, whether you’re asexual or not, that doesn’t change who you are.  If you feel comfortable identifying as ace, that’s wonderful!  If you don’t, you don’t have to! Maybe it will just take some getting used to, or maybe the label just isn’t what you’re feeling, and that’s perfectly okay.  No one else can decide who you are, only you can. All I can hope for is that you love yourself.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Anyone who is interested can find me on Tumblr and Instagram at AceArtCosplay, and on Facebook at Ace Art & Cosplay.  I try to post updates as much as I can, but it doesn’t always happen.

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Thank you, Nikki, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jess Renae Curtis

Today we’re joined by Jess Renae Curtis, who also goes by Jess or Pup. Jess is the phenomenal artist behind PuppyLuver Studios. She does mostly fan work at the moment but has also recently branched out into original work. She is currently dabbling with creating an original universe. Jess is mostly a digital artist and creates both fanart and original characters through drawing. Her work is bright and colorful, capturing the viewer and drawing them in. It shows an amazing attention to detail. It’s clear she’s an extraordinarily talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. owl barber
Owl Barber

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m both a writer and a digital artist. My illustrations are generally focused on characters, both original designs and those from fandoms I’m involved in, and tend to use a lot of varied color. My writing is involved in both fanfiction (notable ones I’m working on at the moment include Chronicles of Tajiria, a Pokémon series but with the Pokémon as people with superpowers/magic, and Sonata in Triplicate, a Legend of Zelda AU series) and my original series Theia Historica, of which I have the first entry (titled A Kingdom of Children) published.

What inspires you?

I don’t really have a definite answer for that, it could be just about anything depending on what sort of thing or things it ends up inspiring. I’ve had small one-page comics based on something funny that happened to me while playing a video game, I’ve designed a character because a YouTuber I follow posted a video of himself shaving his beard with a razor that I initially thought looked like an owl, I’ve drawn pieces based on something funny a friend said to me, lots of things. In fact, the general art direction of Theia Historica has its roots in one very specific part in the PS2 role-playing game Okage: Shadow King, but it’s a long explanation so that’s a story for another time.

2. mermaids working out
Mermaids Working Out

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing ever since I was a little kid, and while I always liked drawing it wasn’t what I wanted to do with my life for the longest time. Funnily enough, my first career choices were astronaut and veterinarian, before I realized that the things in space kinda scared me and I was squeamish about blood and other bodily fluids, so around middle school I decided to try a career path that I already had some skill and comfort in. I started storytelling shortly after becoming literate, though unlike visual art that was always something I could see myself doing professionally, though more as an “after I’m done being an astrovet” thing than as part of my main career.

3. brunswick manor front
Brunswick Manor front

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Can’t think of anything in particular except for the star that I use as my watermark (a five-point star with each point being a different color of the rainbow except for orange). Also in major writing projects I tend to find some way or another to put myself in there. Just…self-insert in the background, there I am.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you’re feeling discouraged about your skill level, remember to keep trying and that you can only get better. You’ve got wonderful visions that’ve been concocted solely by the processes of your imagination, and only you can bring them to life for the world to see. Also, don’t pay attention to what cringe culture says. Make that multicolor Sonic OC if you want. Write a short story about you getting transported to your favorite fictional world and becoming best buds with the main characters if doing so cheers you up when you’re feeling down. Don’t let anyone stop you from enjoying something that makes you happy and doesn’t hurt others.

4. journey-traveler's hub
Journey-Traveler’s Hub

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a sex-repulsed asexual. I’m not entirely sure yet of where I fall in regards to romantic attraction, but if I were to try dating I think I’d want my first attempts at romantic experiences to be with women.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not specifically in my field, no, and I don’t really know how I would handle it if I were to encounter prejudice that was physical or coming from a position of authority. Most people I’ve told about my asexuality are a bit confused as to what it means at first, but once I explain they’re generally supportive. I have had encounters with people who flat-out refused to believe that I was an adult who didn’t enjoy sex and couldn’t ever imagine doing so, but that one was on me for commenting on a video explicitly titled “Why Does Sex Feel Good?” and saying that I couldn’t understand why sex-havers craved it so strongly (I mean, I technically can, cuz if sex weren’t at least somewhat pleasurable to those willingly engaging in it then the species would die out because then no one would be boinking and possibly making babies) and I thought the whole societal obsession with it was a bit ridiculous. I kinda walked into that one, and I ended up just muting that conversation and moving on.

5. skull kid and deku tree
Skull Kid and Deku Tree

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

If they don’t outright dismiss the possibility of asexuality/aromanticism existing, they tend to assume all asexual people share my feelings in that sex is something they wish to avoid. While I am not one of them, there are obviously plenty of asexuals who either are indifferent or even enjoy sex as an activity. I’m put off by all the mess that I’ve heard results from a typical sexual encounter to even consider trying it, but I will never knock on any sex-positive or sex-neutral aces.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Not having a sexual or romantic attraction is just as normal as having a sexual or romantic attraction to people of a different gender, the same gender, or multiple genders. You’re not broken just because all your peers are ogling “sexy” celebrities and you find yourself feeling indifferent to the whole thing. And don’t listen to all the highly vocal exclusionists plaguing the internet that say a-spec people don’t belong. They are the minority given megaphones, and the majority of LGBT groups and spaces are inclusive of a-specs.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find my stuff on DeviantART under the username PuppyLuver, and on Tumblr, Twitter, FanFiction.net, and AO3 under the username PuppyLuver256. I also have a Redbubble store and a Patreon.

6. shiny mahina
Shiny Mahina

Thank you, Jess, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Meg

Today we’re joined by Meg. Meg is a phenomenal visual artist who specializes in photo manipulation and book cover design. Her work is gorgeous, showing a keen eye for detail and a vivid imagination. It’s clear she’s an artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I mostly do digital art with the program Photoshop CC. The majority of things that I make fall under the categories of photomanipulation and book cover design. I’ve been practicing doing digital art for five years now and I hope to continue in the future.

What inspires you?

Anything and everything. Sometimes I’ll be out walking on the street with my family and I’ll stop to take a picture of a design that I particularly like. They will confirm this.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was younger, I wanted to be the type of artist who did paintings and the like. Does that count? Of course, I realized I couldn’t draw for shit, so, you know, digital art. But yeah, I’ve always kind of wanted to do some kind of art.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I wish. I will say that the majority of my work includes the color blue as it has been a long time favorite of mine.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

As Dory says, ‘Just keep swimming.’ Don’t give up just because you see someone that you think is way better than you, or because you think that you aren’t good enough. It may sound cliché, but nobody starts off any art as Michelangelo. On that note, try not to be too harsh on your own work, something I’m frequently guilty of myself. Whoops.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

So, so, so asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Actually, I have not experienced a lot of prejudice in my field, and I’m very thankful for that.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexuals don’t have dirty minds. Oh my god, so not true. Speaking from personal experience.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s not ‘weird’ or ‘strange’ to be asexual. It is what it is.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I actually have a website! (Finally): pantographics.wixsite.com/pantographicdesigns

And an Instagram: at pantographics.

Thank you, Meg, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Ellen

Today we’re joined by Ellen. Ellen is a phenomenal freelance artist who does both traditional and digital art. She loves to draw and specializes in both cartoons and realism. Her work has an incredible vividness to it and demonstrates a masterful use of color. She’s a talented and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

pride part 2
Pride

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art is a combination of cartoons and realism. I have been developing my art for 8 years. I love to draw humans, animals or mythical creatures. I use drawing as an escape from the hardships that I face, when the pencil touches the paper or when my stylus touches the tablet, I enter a world where I can express myself without being judged for who I am. In some ways art can be very therapeutic, whether it’s because of school or life in general, I pick up the pencil and doodle away……until the lead snaps or the battery dies on my stylus.

What inspires you?

My friends, they have inspired me and stood by my side through thick and thin. They have supported me for the longest time and they’re the reason I’m still drawing! My dad is also my biggest inspiration, he has supported and inspired for many years. I remember when he would put up my pictures on the fridge when I was in preschool.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I started drawing in 1st grade. I would just draw the usual stick figures with noodle hair. But, one specific person kick started my love for art. When I was in 4th grade, this one girl taught me how to draw humans in a way that looked like a human it didn’t have all those advanced features that an actual human had. Ever since then I started to develop that style into what it is today. I never thought that I would ever become an artist but, look at me now!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Whenever I draw my main human character, I draw this little curl on the top of their head. This trait came from my love of anime as a child and it carried through my style for as long as I can remember. Also I draw the tips of shoes/feet very pointy.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Always take constructive criticism! It will help you in the future when you want to become professional!

two time
Two Time

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Biromantic Asexual 🙂 but I’m still contemplating if I really like boys or not

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Unfortunately, yes. Sometimes I’m really scared to go to a pride event because I’m scared that I will receive backlash due to my orientation. And I have been told constantly that “It’s just a phase, you’ll grow out of it” or “You don’t belong here because you’re basically straight!” Every time I make something pride related and I don’t add the lesbian flag or if I add the ace flag, I will get attacked by other artists who will flood the comment section saying that I’m homophobic for not adding the lesbian flag or that asexuality doesn’t exist and that I should remove it, and that really hurts my self-esteem. I try to ignore it and move on.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re all just whiny virgins who can’t get laid or that we are just “innocent space beans uwu.” another thing that I’ve encountered is that all asexuals are sex-repulsed, some asexuals can have dirty minds or they can view that kind of material, it’s all up to them what they do. If you’re sex-repulsed, that’s fine, but all of us are different.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are not alone, trust me. I was having trouble with my orientation when I was figuring out where I belonged in this community. You are valid! Don’t let anyone tell you that you are not, you are a part of this community and you matter! We are one huge asexual family.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can follow me on:

Deviantart: https://www.deviantart.com/datshinyzoroark
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/datshinyzoroark/

Thank you, Ellen, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Chip

Today we’re joined by Chip. Chip is a phenomenal visual artist and fanartist who uses both traditional and digital media. While she mostly does fanart, she’s hoping to do more original work. Though art is a hobby, her drawings show an extraordinary attention to detail and a vividness that is truly amazing. The use of bright colors draws in the viewer. It’s clear she’s an artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I always loved arts and crafts of all sorts but I usually share drawings on my blog (both traditional and digital). I tend to make more fan art than original but I wish to change that in the future

What inspires you?

Other artists mostly. I take my inspiration from Tumblr, Tapas and Webtoon. I love the way they show their personality in their work.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My earliest memories are of my mum painting with watercolors. She used art as a way of self-healing and reflection and I always watched. I think I’m trying to do the same now.

Also one of my favorite memories is when my primary school invited Nicoletta Costa to talk with us about how she wrote and illustrated her kids books (which I adored)

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I think I’m too young of an artist as of right now 😉 stay tuned to find out

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I’d tell myself to try out and practice the new stuff as I learn it

To not buy beautiful sketchbooks I’m too afraid to ruin (get really ugly ones for practice)

To take a picture/scan/make a copy before you color in the lineart so you don’t have to worry about ruining it

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I fit in the spectrum and I don’t wish for a more specific label. I used to think I HAD to find my super specific custom “term” to be valid but I realized it’s just not the case. For some people it’s important but I’m happy with just knowing the direction I’m going instead of the coordinates y’know?

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I keep myself away from the discourse online and I’m only out to 2 friends irl so I haven’t faced any hardship. I do feel somewhat invisible and unwelcome in both worlds at times but I’d say my insecurities are the only “prejudice” I faced so far.

When I’m lonely I come back to this blog

When I feel unlovable I remind myself it’s a lie and when I feel like too much of a snowflake I tell myself that everybody is one

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re prudes (not true), that nobody will date us without sex (also not true) and that we’re just trying to hop on the “queer train” one way or the other (…no)

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

No experience is like the other. Do your research, listen to as many stories as you can and then just step back for a minute. You don’t have to figure it all now. Go for what feels right and allow yourself to change

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find me on both Tumblr and DeviantArt at c0uchpotatochip! Feel free to tag along

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Thank you, Chip, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.