Interview: Anna Perkins

Today we’re joined by Anna Perkins. Anna is a wonderful young musician who sings in their school choir. They plan to study music in college. It’s very clear that they’re a passionate and dedicated musician, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a vocal musician, in choir at school; and in a couple years will be going to college and major in vocal music.

What inspires you?

I’m not really sure. When I see a piece of music I just a this warm feeling inside me, then when I start reading it and singing

it the feeling spreads throughout my body and it’s just amazing.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

When I was younger I saw some people in their school choir and they looked so happy and the music I heard made me really happy and that got me to pursue music. One of the first memories I have it listening to a choir so yes I have always wanted to.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I do not have one.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t let anything get in your way. If you want to get to a certain level then work for it. And if you audition for something, or you submit a piece to a contest, or anything where your art would be judged, try your best. If you don’t win then learn from that. Not every piece will be a winner.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a sex repulsed asexual pan romantic Agender human 🙂

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not in my field, but in other places I have. Idk if that counts still but any kind or ace prejudice or ignorance, just try not to let it get to you. They do not define you. You do.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Well, most people think that I’m asexual because I was sexually harassed and that that means that one day I will want to have sex with my significant other. This is not true at all.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Just go with what you feel. If you think that you are asexual then go for it. If you want to change your mind or you think that you’re something else, that’s fine. You define you. Not anyone else.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

People can message my Tumblr or my Instagram (basementdelusion is the username for both) and ask any question they would like to. I don’t post videos of me singing because I don’t want to post something and then have people try to judge me or tell me what to do with my music so I just keep it for myself until someone asks to hear me then I send a video to them if they like.

Thank you, Anna, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: hicough

Today we’re joined by hicough. hicough is a phenomenally versatile artist who has done a bit of everything. Her main passion is performance art and she loves to act on stage. Aside from that, she does a little bit of drawing and is interested in film. She has a marvelous passion as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

ezio
Ezio

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do a lot of different art! As of right now I’m focusing more on the performing arts. I’ve been in seven stage productions (currently in my eighth) and I’ve filmed/edited 2 student films. One of these shows I’ve even performed at the largest international arts festival in the world – the Edinburgh Fringe Festival! I’ll sometimes doodle and I was into it for a while and I even cosplayed as well (spent a month creating an Ezio costume out of old bedsheets), but performing arts is my true passion! I’ve played the piano ever since I was 7 (AKA quite a while) and I was a part of my high school’s marching band and played in the pit! Did I mention I was also in ACDA (American Choral Directors Association) which is America’s international choir and claimed my middle school’s 1st place orchestra trophy at Disneyland for Music In the Parks twice?

Even though I’ve always been on stage I’ve recently gotten *mawkishly* attached to the camera and I’ve learned to enjoy being behind the scenes (what can I say? I love being in charge!). I hope to study script writing and directing in London in the future and bring more asexual representation to the big and small screen! I’m actually working on a TV show right now with an ace protagonist!

What inspires you?

Other artists. Granted, I will often get jealous by their abilities but I’ve been overcoming that and using their art to fuel my own passion. Sometimes circumstances I find myself in will also bring inspiration to me – heck, I was inspired to write my first novel when I was 10 by staring at a tree for long enough!

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I grew up in a very arts oriented family, so I was always submerged in this area. However, it wasn’t until I saw the film War Horse that I realized how amazing film was. I don’t know how, but it somehow made me realize different directors had a style and there were themes – colors, sounds, and camera angles really impacted the way the audience saw a movie. But my turning point for choosing future education was my high school drama teacher. When I performed at the Fringe we spent a few days in London – then, out of the blue, she tells me “You just fit here!” That’s when I officially decided I wanted to study art abroad.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really. I’d like to have one though!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Just keep trying, don’t give up on what you want, set goals, and explore opportunities!! If you asked eleven-year-old me what she wanted to be when she grew up she would tell you “A famous actress, of course! Or…maybe a famous author…” At that age I would never have thought of becoming a film director. Heck, if you had told high school freshman me that she would be performing in the high school band in two years she would have scoffed! And while I had to give up doing a high school show to go to marching band competitions, it opened up so many doors for me – brought new friendships, and expanded my future!

aro-and-ace
Aro and Ace

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Heteroromantic asexual. I might be demisexual but I’ve never been in a relationship, so it’s not like I’d know 😛

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have encountered a lot of ignorance. I only came out just this year and I haven’t told everyone, but a lot of people were confused by what that meant – which was totally fine, I didn’t even know what it was until about a year before I started identifying myself as ace. I’d just ask what they didn’t understand and try to explain it to the best of my ability. There have been times when I couldn’t quite answer their question and that’s okay! I’d just be honest and point them in right direction to find answers.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“It’s just a phase.” “You’ll find someone eventually.” OH MY GOSH this is so annoying. I’m pretty sure everyone who falls on the ace spectrum has encountered this and it can be so very irritating. Especially if it comes from your parents, which was my case. However, I don’t let it get me down or make me question myself – I try to explain what I can and let these kinds of people believe what they want to – it’s not my fault they choose to be ignorant. However, I am still kind and open to these people. And while I don’t openly discuss my sexuality, whenever they say something incorrect about asexuality I will simply politely correct them – hopefully these small influences over time can make a difference.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay if you aren’t sure yet. Heck, there are days when I still question myself. Things can change and often do. As soon as I learned the term “asexual” I began to question my “heterosexual” orientation and I’m glad a did. Like I said earlier, I don’t know if I’m demi or not because I haven’t been in a relationship – you’ll always be learning new things about yourself as time goes on. Reach out and learn more about what’s out there; you may find something you think fits you better or you may further solidify yourself in your orientation – not to mention you learn more about the LGBTQ+ community. It’s a win-win!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have too many accounts for too many things, so I’ll stick with my main ones, haha. My Tumblr is aglon-author, my YouTube is also AglonAuthor, my Wattpad is JustAnAuthor-Captain, and I’ve got a Kahoot! if any ya’ll are interested in that – my username for that is hicough.

Thank you, hicough, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Kate Urquhart

Today we’re joined by Kate Urquhart. Kate is a phenomenal artist who does a number of things. She participates in choir and chorale, a talented singer. Kate also does a lot of writing. When she’s not doing either of those, Kate is a dedicated crafter who does a number of things, including embroidery. She has included a truly gorgeous embroidery that took her two years to complete. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a singer, a writer, and a craft lover. I’m currently a member of two different choirs/chorales. I’m still not sure what the different is between choir and chorale, but anyway… One is definitely a choral, and the other is a small church choir. Between the two I get the opportunity to sing and perform heaps of different songs. So far this year I’ve performed Beatles classics, cheesy love songs, old show tunes, a small Latin number, and a lot of songs about Jesus (church choir, obviously).

My writing is just something small I do on the side as a way of coping with life. Sometimes I write poems, sometimes its snippets of stories, and sometimes it’s just a stream of consciousness to clear my head.

Alongside singing and writing, I also do knitting, crocheting, quilting, embroidery (cross stitch), and baking.

What inspires you?

I guess the need to cope ‘inspires’ my singing, writing, and craft. It gives me an outlet to deal with emotions. When my mind feels cluttered and fuzzy, I need a way to redirect whatever I’m feeling, and this is the best way I’ve found.

The internet is also a big source of inspiration. If I see a cute blanket or scarf online that is too awesome to be real, I can’t help but give it a go. Sometimes I’ll just happen upon an image that fills my mind with words, but I also follow a few writing prompt blogs to help generate ideas.

What got you interested in your field? Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always had an interest in creative outlets. Over the course of my (short) life so far, I’ve had a go at all sorts of things. I have little to no talent in drawing, painting, photography, dancing, acting, or playing a musical instrument, which I discovered in each and every one of them. But along the way I found where my true passions lie.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Ace characters. Literally always. Every single character, narrator, or persona in my writing is somewhere on the ace spectrum. Even if you don’t know anything about their sexuality, they are secretly ace.

I am also particularly fond of the oxford comma, so if you read a story or poem and it doesn’t have said grammatical necessity, please know it was not written by me.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I’m not sure I really have any advice to give. Just do whatever you love. Be passionate about it. Even if you think your work isn’t great, it is, and if you love it you should keep doing it. The world is an ugly place at times, so by being an artist– by making beautiful things in an ugly world, you are doing something wonderful and brave and amazing.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual and biromantic (I think – I haven’t quite figured myself out yet, but that label has worked so far). More specifically, I’m a sex repulsed ace. Quite frankly I’d rather eat a bowl of brussel sprouts. Ew.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field? If so, how do you handle it?

I’m not all that out there, both with my sexuality and with what I do, so I haven’t really come across prejudice. Generally speaking, though, I have come across a bit. My mum initially told me I’d grow out of it but she’s become a lot more accepting/understanding recently, and some of my friends had never heard of the ace spectrum before (but they fully supported me after they found out).

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“It’s just a phase.” What more do I need to say? It’s not a phase, I’m not being dramatic or ‘unique’ or picky or prudish. It’s just who I am. I was born this way; I will most likely die this way. Asexuality is valid and real.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t let anyone else tell you who they think you are. You know yourself best. If someone tries to say that you’re too young to know, or you’re not valid, or it’s just a phase, bite their head off. Seriously, bite. Their. Head. Off. You get to pick which labels you want, and you get to decide who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Please visit (and follow) my blog: http://www.passive-soldier.tumblr.com/.

Thank you, Kate, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.