Interview: S.C. Wines

Today we’re joined by S.C. Wines. S.C. is a wonderful author who recently published her first novel (which is available at this link: http://www.xlibris.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001147919). She specializes in YA fiction and it’s very apparent that she’s a passionate author, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a writer. I have a passion of YA and adventure novels that turn classic tropes on their head.

What inspires you?

My generation (millennials) inspire me the most. I have always heard the complaints about book/TV/movies and how they could be so much better if someone explored a topic or two. I became inspired to be the change instead of waiting for that to happen. In my stories I love to add LGBT+ characters because we are a tragically underrepresented group, as well as using characters of color, and other minority groups to give positive representation. I also get inspired to tell stories with a realistic representation of women (and their relationships with other women). Additionally I am inspired by social and historical events so I can depict real and honest topics in my writing.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have always loved to write. English and reading were my favorite subjects in school. I had always gotten great grades on my papers, and I even wrote short stories for fun. When I was 18 my teachers told me I needed to find a realistic career goal. I ended up going to college and majoring in Political Science (I had a small Elle Woods fantasy), but after a while I realized I wasn’t going to be happy, unless I was writing. I left school to become a writer, and I have never been happier.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I tend to base my main character after myself. I know that’s a classic writers signature, but considering I’m not your classic person, I feel like it brings something fresh to fiction. No matter if my character is a exactly like me, I try to at least bring my personality into the character so I can personalize and humanize their interactions within the stories.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you honestly believe you can make a living out of your work, do whatever it takes to get there. You will be so much happier if you listen to your heart, not the people who say you can’t.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am an asexual/biromantic/demigirl. As far as asexuality goes, I am pretty deep into the “no sexual attraction” classification. I’ve never experience anything I could consider as sexual attraction, but I am not fully sex repulsed. (I call it oral repulsed, if that’s not too much information.)

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

As a writer, I would love to be able to write about a character just like me, however the commercial value of an Ace is sadly small. I find myself struggling between staying true to what I want and what would make the best story for a wider audience.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The classic “So you just don’t like sex or…?” It’s the run of the mill disbelief that a person could lack sexual attraction. It’s just harmless ignorance about the topic. I don’t mind explain my sexuality it all that much, except when people don’t believe it, or make fun of it. It’s always the worse when someone makes a joke about something so important to me.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t be ashamed. It’s understandable to be afraid to come out, especially if your romantic/gender identifications are non het/cis. But be honest with yourself and be proud of who you are. It can be a quiet, personal celebration, but it’s important to know that you are valid and there is nothing wrong or broken about you.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I am have published my first book, a YA entitled Camisado. Updates can be found on the book’s Tumblr, Instagram, and Facebook all under the username “CamisadotheBook”.

Thank you, S.C., for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Adalyn Caroline

Today we’re joined by Adalyn Caroline. Adalyn is a phenomenal and unique writer who specializes in hint fiction. She dabbles in fantasy, though also does quite a bit of writing in a genre she calls “fictionalized nonfiction.” When she’s not working on fiction, Adalyn also likes to write poetry. She is an incredibly talented writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Am I Perfect Yet
Am I Perfect Yet

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a writer. I dabble in children’s stories and poetry. Most of my pieces are short story or hint fictions (less than 25 words).  The majority of my pieces are my own personal genre of “fictionalized nonfiction” but I do dabble in some fantasy. Like most writers, I tend to write in third person, however I am working on another piece that is in first person, and is chronicling the journey of discovering my sexuality and orientation.

What inspires you?

Everything, honestly. But I do tend to pull a lot from real life and from other literary pieces that really touch me. To quote Mark Twain, there is no such thing as an original idea.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My long term goal is to eventually get into the publishing industry as an editor, but I was always interested in writing. I remember writing these little books when was I was kid that helped me escape the harsh reality that was my life at the time. Although, I didn’t know then that’s what it was. And as I grew older, I focused more on refining my writing skills because of my anxiety.

Untitled5_HintFiction
Untitled 5 (Hint Fiction)

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

There are technically two. The protagonists are always demisexual, even if they don’t straight out identify as it. The other one is that each of my protagonists has an article of clothing, or a trinket or a pillow, etc. that is a turtle.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t feel like your work is subpar. Ever. And if you think your work is too similar to something that’s already out there, remember: There is no such thing as an original idea. We build off everything around us.

We're All Mad Here
We’re All Mad Here

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am a biromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I tend to keep my sexuality to myself, aside from a few close friends. That being said, I have not experienced any prejudice. I find that those who are truly artistic, are more open-minded and aren’t as judgmental.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Well, there are several that I have gotten but the most common one is that asexuality doesn’t exist. Quite frankly, it’s the most heartbreaking thing I hear, especially when it comes from someone whom I’ve grown to trust and feel like I might be able to come out to. Alternatively, I also get a lot of comments that those who identify as asexual can be ‘fixed’ with sex-therapy.

Winter_HintFiction
Winter (Hint Fiction)

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I struggled with coming to terms of the biromantism portion of my sexuality for a long time. I had a traumatic experience when I was twelve involving a rape accusation and for the longest time I shied away from that part of who I was. I also didn’t realize I identified as asexual until I started to talk to a friend of mine who is extremely active and vocal with the LGBTQ+ community and she pretty much opened my eyes to asexuality.

My advice is this: don’t let anyone tell you you’re broken. You aren’t. Your sexuality and orientation plays a big part of who you are and it’s better to have a small support group of people you can trust than to try to change who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I am currently working on uploading my work onto a Wattpad account. However, that is taking me a little while to finish up due to some personal complications. I am hoping to have everything up by the end of the August. I am also in the process of potentially developing a WordPress site.

If you would like to receive an email of when my work is up, you can reach me at Adalyn.Caroline23@gmail.com

Wonderland_HintFiction
Wonderland (Hint Fiction)

Thank you, Adalyn, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Baylee Morris

Today we’re joined by Baylee Morris. Baylee is a phenomenal musician who has been playing the clarinet for almost ten years. When she’s not playing, Baylee teaches younger musicians. It’s very obvious that she’s an incredibly talented and dedicated musician, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’ve been playing the clarinet for about 10 years now and I still love it. I mostly played in school, but after I graduated high school, I still continue to play at church and teach up comers at my alma maters. I also teach children at my church how to read sheet music and piano basics. After I graduated, I didn’t think I would be able to continue music, but luckily, I found small, but meaningful ways to keep going.

What inspires you?

Mostly music. I can’t handle silence, and music feels empty space like no other substance. I’ve always felt this way. Plus, as a sufferer from ADHD, fidgeting was a problem I had in my younger days in school, so being able to use my own body to make music… it’s just fantastic.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My older brother was in band two years before I was and all his stories from marching band and the concerts that I witnessed myself pretty much made up my mind. I got my clarinet two years before I joined in 6th grade, and love every bit of it.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I was the youngest person in my band’s history to be section leader in marching band and also the first person in years to take on the section leader role, as well as another head role in the band- mine being Uniform Chief. I’m really proud of this and was incredibly happy to help younger students reach their own potentials.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Stick with what you love, and things will fall into place. In a group of 70+ people, you are going to encounter people that don’t appreciate it as much as you, or the work that you put into it. Keep going though. Keep doing what you love.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual/Biromantic

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Since band kids are sometimes labeled as “sexually active” (LOL mean girls), being not sexually active surprises some people. I’ve heard it all; “Why are you sooooo prude?”, “You just haven’t found the right guy!”, and “Maybe you could find someone if you’d just lighten up.” These were from people in band and out of band.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common (and most hurtful) thing that I’ve encountered were from past significant others is “You just don’t love me enough.” or “What’s wrong with me?” This can hurt your feels, but remember, you are not obligated to do anything, no matter how much you love the person or how guilty the try to make you feel.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Accept yourself the way you are! There are so many people out there that share your same views. Why focus on the negative people when you can befriend the amazing people who are willing to talk to you like an actual human being?

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

If you want to see my specific band, you can YouTube search Jackson County Bands NC. But if you want to see some wicked cool stuff, try look for BOA (Bands of America) bands, Drum Corps (Cadets are a personal favorite of mine), or head to your own school’s concert. Those band kids will appreciate it. Believe me, they will.

Thank you, Baylee, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Fiia

Today we’re joined by Fiia. Fiia is an amazingly versatile young artist from Finland. She does a bit of everything: writing, film, and plenty of visual art. She’s marvelously passionate about the art she does and has a very creative spirit, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do many kinds of art, especially now that I study media. Photography, all kinds of editing (photos, videos, sound), short films, graphic design… and the list goes on. And I love it all! I also like to draw and paint and whatnot. I’m not that great, but I like it. That’s the important thing, right?

But what I absolutely love to do, is write.

So I love to write. What I write has been ranging from poetry to fanfiction, and from regular short stories to screenwriting. The last year or so I’ve been concentrating on screenwriting; TV show scripts, to be precise. The genre is usually somewhere along the lines of action drama, because I can’t bring myself to be interested in “regular” relationship love dramas.

Also, I always write in English. I’m from Finland, so English isn’t my first language (it’s actually my third, Swedish being the second) but I’ve kept it from stopping me. I was around 13 when I started writing in English, and I haven’t stopped since. Nowadays I couldn’t write in Finnish even if I tried, because everything sounds so dumb to me!

What inspires you?

I’m inspired by a lot of things. Mostly just what happens around me; regular people. I love the idea of taking a normal person and throwing them into a completely different setting, like in a story I’m currently writing. It’s the regular life and regular people who inspire me to begin a story, but it’s the adventure that inspires me to work out the plot and write it down.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved writing, ever since I knew how to hold a pen and how to write Finnish. I don’t even know where the passion comes from, because even though I have artists in my family (mom is a tattoo artist and my big brother does comics for a living), I’m the only one who enjoys writing.

It’s probably just the power to create anything that’s got me hooked on writing. Pick a word, write it down, and a couple thousand words later I could’ve created a whole different universe. This isn’t, naturally, how I saw it as a kid, but it was probably something similar even if I didn’t actually realize it. I just wanted to tell stories.

One of my earliest dream jobs was to be an author. Over the years it shifted and I dreamt of becoming a psychologist, but I still wanted to publish a book. Then I wanted to become a nurse, a teacher, a translator … and now finally I want to be in the TV/movie business. Either as a screenwriter or a cameraman/editor. Or maybe even all three.

So being an author/screenwriter wasn’t always on the top of the list, but it was always there.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I love to explore friendships. They are important in whatever I write, because I love nothing more than a person willing to go to a great length for the sake of a close friend.

This isn’t as important as the above, but there is always (a lot of) action in my stories, and recently the stories have revolved around good and bad, as simple as it sounds. There is more often than not a criminal aspect, usually pretty important, and how the lines between good and bad are really shaky, blurry and broken sometimes.

To put it short, I have a certain style, like most artists. I try new things every now and then, but the above is what feels best to me and what I enjoy the most.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

This may be a bit cliché, but believe in what you do and work hard. It’s a sad truth that maybe it will never work out and you’ll have to settle for a job that isn’t an artist – but other people have made it, and you shouldn’t give up your dream without a fight. Get better at what you do, practice some more and never give up, and who knows? Just make sure to keep at least your other foot on the ground and remember that life goes on even if we don’t make it there.

image1

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Totally asexual, like 110%. I’m also biromantic.

Although, I must admit, I just usually call myself bisexual. I don’t think it’s anyone’s business, really, and it’s just less confusing that way.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

No, I’m lucky and I haven’t. Asexuality hasn’t really been a problem for me in any way, and since I’m still just a student with a few close friends in a small town, I’m relatively safe from anything like that.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’ll magically like it once I try it. I’ve been trying to explain it to my mom and my best friend, and they both keep saying I can’t know whether or not I like it since I’m a virgin. I keep telling them “I know I won’t like parachuting either, even though I haven’t tried it, because I know myself and I’ve seen enough of it to have a feeling of what it’s like.”

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Accept yourself, and understand that there’s nothing wrong with you. Sex is all over the place and we all know the pressure to have it, but just know that that’s not the case. You’re perfect just the way you are, and asexuality doesn’t define you. You can do and be whatever you want.

Also, you’ll find someone who loves you, asexual or not, and they won’t give a shred of an f. Just keep your head high, be yourself, and the right people will find you.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Unfortunately nowhere just yet, but who knows, maybe in some years you’ll see my TV shows on TV 😉

image3

Thank you, Fiia, for participating in this interview and this project. It is very much appreciated.

Interview: Clara

Today we’re joined by Clara. Clara is a wonderful and versatile artist who does a bit of everything. She’s been drawing for a few years now. When she’s not drawing, Clara loves to write and does quite a bit of fanart as well. She’s obviously a very passionate artist and it shows in her interview. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I consider myself a writer, fanartist and artist. I’ve written one complete novel and am constantly working on my writing skill, as an artist I’ve been playing around with creating a style in digital art and I’ve been expanding into the animation area and as a fanartist I use both of my ‘platforms’ in different ways by writing fanfiction or drawing fan art.

What inspires you?

Seeing other people their work and the things I see in the news or read online. In general I get my ideas either from seeing/reading what other people have made or seeing things online that I want to write something about or draw something like that.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Somewhat. Ever since I was little I’ve been playing games and thanks to those I’ve always wanted to work at a gaming company like Ubisoft or Bethesda. I’ve always been playing story-heavy games or RPG so when I discovered a certain thing called fanfiction I got hooked on reading it and eventually decided, why not? And so I started to write and by now I’ve written a complete novel in my second language, English. Drawing came from my obsession with Pokemon but I never planned on drawing as much as I am now.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really have anything like that. When it comes to my writing I’m certain I don’t have anything like that because I feel like my writing changes all the time and when it comes to art I don’t do anything special either, I’d like to reveal something but I don’t have anything.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I don’t have much as I myself am still quite young, I haven’t finished high school yet. The best advice I have is just to do what you love. If you’re being held back because you feel like you’ll never be good enough, there will be always be someone better but no one can be better at you being yourself so don’t worry too much about it. Do what you want, take criticism but only if it’s constructive and use it to continue but just never let yourself be held back because of other people.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as Asexual and Biromantic but as most people haven’t really heard of biromantic, panromantic, aromantic etc. I just tend to say I’m Asexual and attracted to both genders.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have never been the victim but I’ve seen it a few times though not necessarily in what I would consider my field. I’ve seen a big discussion of people whom were discussing if people who are Asexual but only attracted to the opposite gender belong in the LGBT+ community. In general when I see it if I know I can form a rational discussion I would engage but otherwise I wouldn’t, sometimes it’s hard to do that but I know that having a discussion with someone who isn’t willing to change views is pointless.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t have sex or aren’t romantically attracted to people. Asexual is just that you don’t desire or feel the need for sex. There are people who are Asexual and don’t have sex but there are also ones who do. Just as there are people who identify as Asexual and Aromantic but others who don’t.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t worry about it too much. Who you are sexually interested in or who you want to have a relationship with does not define who you are and it won’t make every decision in your life. It’ll have an influence but that doesn’t mean you need to let it rule everything you do. If there are people who are worried about a future, don’t. There are plenty of Asexual people who are adults or have finished University/college and are in a happy relationship with someone. Some people in those relationships have sex and some don’t. In the end a partner is someone who accepts you, not someone who only wants to be with you for sex because then it’s not a healthy relationship to start with.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

On Tumblr // doctorclarami.tumblr.com
Deviantart // doctorclarami.

Thank you, Clara, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Clara Quinion

Today we’re joined by Clara. Clara is a phenomenal science fiction writer who is quite prolific. To date, she has written three novels, a number of short stories, and some poetry as well. It is quite apparent that she has an incredibly bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write science fiction. Also bits of art, photography, and craft.

What inspires you?

Everything. I’m a highly sensitive introvert with synesthesia. I take in more sensory impressions than most people, spend a long time mulling them over, making connections, and come out with some interesting thought-experiments.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I used to draw all the time when I was a kid. During my teens I got more into photography, and thought that would be my career. That didn’t work out. I got into writing by serendipity: having failed to get into any arts courses at university, I applied for a bunch of other creative courses through clearing, and got into an English with Creative Writing degree.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I write in a multiverse called The Sustained World: all worlds capable of sustaining intelligent life lined up, separated by the Void, yet transversible. The denizens of The Sustained World are called Eltoids, which is a wider definition than humanoid, and means creatures capable of intelligence, communication, and manual dexterity, the symbol of which is a three-noded triangle. I’m also working a lot with black crow imagery: in The Sustained World, the Reapers who take the spirits of the deceased to the Void take the shape of crows.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Do your own thing. Not what’s popular. Not what you think will sell. Not what everyone else is doing. Your own thing. You don’t have to be the best at your medium. Being authentic is much more important.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual and biromantic/panromantic. And queer, as far as I think that gender roles are arbitrary rubbish.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Nothing comes to mind. In the past I haven’t actually spoken much about not wanting to have sex. Just kept quiet and nodded along when people bring such things up. I have a pretty filthy sense of humour and I don’t mind talking about sex at all, but I always get uncomfortable if I see sexual imagery.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Not directly, but I feel that it’s been indicated to me that being sexually active is like a further step in developing towards adulthood. Probably by the same sort of people who think getting drunk is a sign of maturity. Knowing yourself and what you like and don’t like is a great step in your development.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There is nothing wrong with you. Sex is not a fundamental need like eating and sleeping. It’s more like an interest. I have no interest in sex just as I have no interest in sports. We are all different, and that’s what makes us beautiful. Do your thing, and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re wrong because you don’t like what they like.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

http://thesustainedworldatransverse.tumblr.com/ and www.facebook.com/ClaraQuinionWriting

Thank you, Clara, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Cas Fletcher

Today we’re joined by Cas Fletcher. Cas is a wonderful writer who writes in a variety of forms. She writes short fiction, poetry, and fanfiction. Cas is currently working on a longer story, which might become a novel. It’s very apparent that she loves the art of writing, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I mostly write short stories and poetry, but I also write fanfiction and I am planning something of a longer piece at the moment. Not sure if it’ll be a full length novel, but I suppose I’ll find out when I get there.

What inspires you?

I feel like I have a lot of different stories to tell and I am mostly motivated by my characters demanding that I write them down, however I do feel like another major motivation for me is spite. Ever since Steven Moffat’s lovely ‘asexuals are boring’ comment, my main aim is to include as many asexual characters as possible in my stories, just to prove him wrong. That and his special interest in nonsensical plots and overindulgent twists have set me firmly on the course to prove myself better than him.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I read a lot of books as a child and I came across a book that had been written by a girl who was fourteen at the time, and my little girl brain thought ‘well I’m nine, I’ve got plenty of time to write a book’ (I haven’t and I’m twenty-one now, but oh well, I’ll get there) and I’ve been writing since then.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nothing particularly special, I don’t think. The strongest aspect of my writing is often the dialogue, so you’ll find a lot of that in the longer pieces.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

My advice would be, don’t be discouraged if you read back a first draft and it’s not exactly the way you want it to be. Editing and redrafting is the majority of the process and if you keep at it, it’ll get there eventually. Also try not to compare yourself to other authors’ published work. When you read a book, it’s been extensively polished and edited, and what you’re looking at is the result of month-years of hard work, arguing with editors and a lot of wasted ink. Finally, let your characters drive the plot, otherwise the plot just comes across as empty and forced. They are the core of the story.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual, bi-romantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Nothing especially in my field, but perhaps an abundance of forced, explicit sexual scenes. Once my scriptwriting tutor told me that my relationship is meaningless because I don’t have sex (not that she even knows this) and that was quite hurtful.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

When I first got together with my boyfriend, people kept asking me ‘so does that mean you’re not asexual anymore?’ It’s like they think that it just goes away as soon as you get a partner.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

My advice would be to find as much information as you can. Definitely check out AVEN. It helps a lot to know that you aren’t the only one that feels this way. I’m only just discovering the community myself and I’ve felt very welcomed.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My original works can be found on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/casfletcherwriting/ WordPress: https://casfletcher.wordpress.com/ and Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/blog/casfletcherwriting, whichever you’d prefer, and my fanfiction can be found on AO3: http://archiveofourown.org/users/Nurmengardx/pseuds/Nurmengardx

I’m working on my dissertation right now, but I hope to post a lot more once I graduate.

Thank you, Cas, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.