Signal Boost: IDGAF Shareable

(Shared on Tumblr originally. Please visit there to see the accompanying video)

IDGAF is currently having a Weekend Pitch Party. Here’s the information:

Hi guys!

So IDGAF has just entered be in Stareable’s weekend pitch party! Winning gives us a chance to be featured in their newsletter which gives us a chance at having even MORE exposure and donors. All you have to do to help us accomplish this is go to the link provided below and LIKE the video! If you plan to share it with other friends and family make sure they like the original video as well and not the post that you share it on. It’s the only way the votes can count!

https://www.facebook.com/stareable/videos/792613157592700/

We’d really appreciate you guys helping us do this! Thank you thank you thank you!

Please log onto Facebook, signal boost, and show this webseries some love.

Also, they extended their fundraising deadline, so you can still contribute to getting this webseries made. Here’s the IndieGogo link: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/i-don-t-give-a-f-ck

1. IDGAFcakeposter
IDGAF Cake Poster

Signal Boost: Aromantic Project

Hello all!

I received an email from a lovely individual by the name of Arianna, who is working on a project for the aromantic community. She asked if I wouldn’t mind giving her a signal boost and I agreed. Note this is open to all members of the aromantic community, not just aromantic asexuals.

Hi! I am currently working on a project for the aromantic community, and am looking for aromantic artists willing to share their work. I am looking for visual art such as (paintings, drawings, etc.), poetry, books, and music. I will disclose the project in more detail for interested parties. Contact me [at] assemble-the-fangirls or through my email, arospecinitative@gmail.com. All artists will be credited and linked.

So if you’re interested, please drop Arianna a line. I’m super interested to see what comes of this project 😀

Interview: Midnightcity

Today we’re joined by Midnightcity.  Midnightcity is an amazingly talented visual artist.  They work professionally in animation and they sent along some incredibly striking images that I really enjoyed looking over.  One can just see the creative mind shining through.  My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Zero 2
Zero 2

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art tends to feature monsters, wizards and/or robots (my three fave food groups).

I started drawing with ink and markers at an early age, and slowly shifted to digital art somewhere in my teens. I was never partial to realism, so most of what I draw tends to be very fantasy based.

What inspires you?

Inspiration comes from a lot of different sources. Growing up, I devoured animated films like Miyazaki’s Spirited Away and Tim Burton’s Nightmare before Christmas. Those definitely left creative impressions on me in terms of the kind of aesthetic I enjoy in art, and also the kind of whimsy I enjoy in story-telling.

As I got older, I became more interested in stuff like theoretical sciences and philosophy. I like to attempt to use those abstract themes in my own stories and characters.

Zero
Zero

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing since as long as I can remember. As soon as I became old enough to realize that I’d have to pretend to be competent at something in exchange for money, I was determined to turn my hobby into a career, because to be honest, I had no idea what else I would be able to do, haha.

Animation was the field I focused on in particular, because I have always loved creating characters and telling stories about their lives, and I wanted to be a part of that process on a collaborative scale.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

EYES. Weird eyes, small eyes, eyes of an incorrect number. I’ll put eyes on anything so WATCH OUT.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Draw what you love, write what you love — make what you love! The more you enjoy creating, the more your passion will shine through in your artwork. It’s a real, quantifiable thing that people can see.

Marine
Marine

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual + aromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not so much out-right prejudice, but ignorance certainly seems to be pretty much everywhere. It’s definitely tough to find narratives that feature canon asexual characters. I would love to be a contributor to change in that way.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Usually either that asexuality isn’t a real thing, or that it is a disorder of some sort. Also, I think a lot of the underlying assumption about asexuality is that it means ace individuals are somehow ‘immature’. Sex and the desire to participate is such an overused, overrated aspect of what it means to be mature.

Cro
Cro

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t let people erase your identity just because they don’t understand it. You are the only person who knows who you truly are, and you’re the only person who has any right to label yourself. Your identity can change as you grow, too, so you should never feel rushed into figuring it all out.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Here, have a tumblr blog where I post both WIPs and finished art! midnightcityart.tumblr.com

Bons
Bons

Thank you so much, Midnightcity, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Teresa Santos

Today we’re joined by Teresa Santos.  Teresa is an amateur writer and photographer.  She’s a very versatile photographer and the images she sent along are absolutely lovely.  Her writing isn’t public yet, but if her photography is anything to go by, this is an artist who has an incredibly bright future ahead of her.  My thanks to her for taking part in this interview.

Cosplay photos
Cosplay photos

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m an amateur writer and photographer, two types of art I have dabbled in for years but never quite took to the next level. Fingers crossed that’ll change soon! In terms of writing, I write mostly short fantasy stories and have been slowly writing two YA novels, one fantasy, one contemporary.

As for photography, I do a little bit of everything: landscape, wildlife, urban, portrait – when I manage to go to a con or a medieval fair -, experimental, and travel photography. It all depends on where I go and what happens there that captures my eye.

What inspires you?

Nature, first and foremost. I’m a biologist by trade, so animals and the environment always seem to sneak into whatever I do. As do fairytales and everything magic. It may sound like a contradiction, but I’ve found that if there is a contrast between magic and science, there are also points where the two meet. Both the contrast and the blur, and the feelings they evoke, pique my interest. Current affairs and people’s perception also play a huge part in everything I make, especially LGBTQ+ issues and politics.

But nothing at all would come of it, if it wasn’t for the work of greater artists, whom I shan’t name because there are so many of them I’m bound to forget some and then chastise myself for it. Let’s just say it’s a combination of books, music (and musicals), films, and Flickr/DeviantArt artists.

Dwarf Mongoose I
Dwarf Mongoose I

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’m not quite sure, to be honest. I have liked writing and photography ever since I was a child. At the age of nine, I would make little illustrated books in the winter, and cut my family’s heads in a group photo in the summer. Even when my notebooks were full and my parents had hold of the camera, I’d be begging for more paper and a camera of my own so I could capture everything. At fourteen, I knew that the only way to be happy was to pursue science without letting go of art. At nineteen, I’d be binge reading a series instead of studying for exams and taking my camera to every field trip. Now, I use every free moment I can to immerse myself in colour and storytelling. Art was always part of me, I suppose. I just never learned how to turn it into a “job”.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not that I’m aware of. However, some friends have told me I have the tendency to heighten colours and contrasts, and use a lot of greens and browns (is that the influence of Biology again?) in my photography. Looking at it, it is probably a very good point.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Take your tools of the trade everywhere, be it a camera or a notebook (unless it’s very heavy, in which case, don’t or you’ll seriously damage your back and shoulders – nobody ever warns you about that!). Live life with wide eyes and pay attention. When you feel like giving up, take a walk. You never know what might happen. Sometimes the simple blowing of a leaf or the angle of the light can spark a brand new idea or breathe life into an old one.

Owl
Owl

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as aromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

All writers I communicate with are either 100% fine with LGBTQ+ or part of the community themselves, so I never spotted much prejudice there. As for the photography crew, it’s mostly composed of fellow biologists who feel such wonder about the world that they mostly don’t do or say anything horrible about asexuality. If anything, they ask me what it’s like, if there is any physiological or epigenetic explanation of it, and so on. It’s all very curiosity based.

I did say mostly though. I’ve had two instances where the reaction was not exactly positive, but not from photographers. They were two, at the time, fellow biology undergraduates. The first, who was convinced I was a lesbian because I had never had a boyfriend whilst everyone else in my year got around, was astonished at my explanation of asexuality. When he recovered from the shock, he proclaimed the now famous “So you’re an amoeba. Are you going to sprout an extra arm soon?” and laughed awkwardly. I suppose he acted like that because the concept was very new to him and he didn’t know how to react to someone “outing” themselves, especially in a way he did not expect.

The second case (or first really, if we’re doing this timewise) happened shortly after I began identifying myself as an aro ace. At the time, I was really lost on what to do. Should I out myself? Should I keep quiet? Did people in my country even know about asexuality?

So who did I decide to turn to? Why, the only publicly gay man in my course. The conversation barely lasted longer than a minute. After I told him I was ace and explained it to him, he turned to me and said, “Come back to me in ten years and tell me that again.” I insisted I knew what I was saying. “In ten years, tell me again,” he repeated.

Other than that, I’ve just had the usual “oh you haven’t met the right man yet” or “you’re too young, there’s time” or “I used to think the same way but I changed my mind” from acquaintances and family members, but they’re neither in my fields, nor do they know I identify as ace. But again, I doubt they’ve ever even heard of asexuality.

Plants and Big Ben
Plants and Big Ben

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

From my personal experiences, that it doesn’t exist. Although I’ve scarcely ever put a name to it when speaking of how natural it was for people to feel little or no sexual attraction, people’s reactions are nearly always the same. They shake their heads, they laugh, they say that “no, everyone wants to have sex with someone. That’s what makes us human”, or they suggest that such people have a medical problem and should go to the doctor quickly. Ah, erasure, you clinging fiend!

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t force yourself into the shoes of someone you’re not. You don’t owe anybody sex, romance, children or anything else. Your body is your body. As is everything it contains, spirit, mind and organs. You don’t owe anyone anything, no matter what they say. Even though it’s hard, even if you just want to fit in, it’s alright to be different. Everyone is different from everyone, no matter what people say. Find out what you want for the moment and stick to it. If it changes in the future, well, that’s part of character development. If it doesn’t, it’s part of it too. Know your limits and wishes, and embrace them. And if you can, if you have the luck of living near other asexuals, go meet them. If you don’t, the internet is a wonderful place for meeting them, be it on Twitter, Tumblr, or even Facebook. Go ahead, talk to other aces or just watch them from afar. Understand two fundamental truths:
You’re not alone.
You’re not broken.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

To access my writing, you would have to find seven keys – one in each continent -, to open a chest buried in the pit of a sleeping volcano in a remote island, guarded by a six headed dragon. Inside, you would see a computer. But to access it, you would have to swim to the bottom of the ocean and find the stone under which the password is written. Beware, there are hidden mermaids and a mighty kraken awaiting anyone who comes near.

My photography, however, is much easier to find. Just go to my Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tessblack/ or to my blog https://tessellatedtales.wordpress.com/ that also features book reviews and other ramblings. Hope to see you there!

Sea of Clouds V
Sea of Clouds V

Thank you so much, Teresa, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Rose Titus

Today we’re joined by Rose Titus.  Rose is an author whose novella, “Night Home,” was released by Bathory Gate Press and is available through Amazon, Smashwords, and Barnes & Noble online.  Rose tends to write mostly horror and has a regular feature in Blood Moon Rising, an online horror magazine.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Author Photo

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a writer, but not a full time writer, I have a day job to support myself since I don’t make much from writing … like most writers and artists!  Anyway, I’ve had short stories published in literary magazines such as Lost Worlds, Lynx Eye, Bog Gob, Wicked Wheels, Weird Terrain, Blood Moon Rising, The Dead River Review, Mausoleum, and many others…  I have a regular feature in Blood Moon Rising called “The Rose Files,” which is basically “True Scary Stories From Life.”  My novella “Night Home” has recently been published with Bathory Gate Press and is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble .com, and Smash Words.  I write mainly fantasy and horror fiction, but also since I’ve had the experience of restoring a classic car I’ve had articles published in antique car magazines as well.  I also consider the old car project sort of a creative endeavor, by the way.

What inspires you?

Everything … every small thing that occurs in life is an inspiration.  Every little thing in life has significance, even if most people fail to notice.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved to read, but while reading someone else’s story or book, I often found myself saying, ‘I could have done this better.’

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really, but perhaps you would like to refer to my Author Rose Titus Facebook page.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It sound like a cliché, but, “don’t quit your day job, kid.”  Work all day, do creative stuff at night.  Stay sober, don’t get into drugs.  Too many creative people go down that path.  It leads to nowhere.  And just because you’re talented is no guarantee you’ll be famous overnight.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Aromantic Asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I am aware that there is so much horrible ignorance out there, and the stories I have heard from others, threats of rape, threats of death … I just don’t tell very many people.  I let people believe I’m nothing but a tragic spinster … with a cat.  I’d rather they simply just pity me than waste my time trying to explain.   I don’t anticipate many people of my personal acquaintance will be aware of the “Asexual Artist” project since very few people (in real life) that I associate with are even aware that asexuality exists, and probably won’t see this online anyway … 🙂  That is, I don’t anticipate many people of my acquaintance will even notice this, so go ahead and put it on your website, girl … (Oh heck, most people in my life don’t even know I had a book published because they will say, ‘you write about vampires!  Eeek!’ and wave crosses at me!)

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t exist, that we have no emotions, that we can’t be creative because of the myth that creativity “comes from the sex drive” – maybe for some people it does, but creativity can exist on its own, also … plus the usual stupid stuff, ‘you just need a good rape to straighten you out,’ etc.  People are terribly uneducated, so this is why these projects are important.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Just be yourself, don’t worry about trying to be like everyone else.  And be careful who you tell.  People can be a lot stupider and more vicious than a lot of young people realize.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Please look up Blood Moon Rising magazine online (http://bloodmoonrisingmagazine.com/index.html) to see some of my work – it’s a great online horror magazine that’s been around for about ten years with a lot of good writing.  Please look for my book on Amazon.  And if you would like, please visit my author Facebook page.

Thank you so much Rose for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Victoria Marina Rojas

Today we’re joined by Victoria Marina Rojas.  Victoria is a fantastically talented illustrator.  She’s an illustration major and plans to be a children’s book illustrator.  If her art is anything to go by, Victoria has a very bright future ahead of her.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

ACCORDION_PLAYER

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am an illustration major with a goal to become a children’s book illustrator!  I especially love drawing monsters!  I usually draw on Photoshop CS6, with the lasso tool and pen tool.  It’s super fun to draw with shapes and experiment with colors!

What inspires you?

Different things!  Stop motion, Cubism, old illustrated books, etc.  Book illustrations I really love, horror and fantasy.  I aspire to be a book illustrator myself, especially a children’s book illustrator.  Book illustrations inspire me so much, their and use of visual storytelling, composition, and colors (when an illustration has them) is just so fascinating and gorgeous.

DEL

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing since I was in pre-school, I think.  My interest grew as I got older.  The more I looked at book illustrations, the more my desire to become an illustrator grew.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nope.  Sometimes I just write my nickname (Vicky) and year.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Practice is great.  Challenging yourself is good as well from studying life and references.  However, I hear a lot of the “Draw everyday until your hand falls off, even if you’re reluctant!”  But I must say: Take breaks when you can!!  I’m not opposed to drawing everyday, but some just can’t do it.  And that’s OKAY.  Everyone progresses at their own pace, some fast, others slowly.  It can REALLY stress many artists rather than motivate them if they force something they’re not comfortable doing at the moment.  Take your time.  If you need a break or just don’t want to draw for the day, then that’s perfectly fine.  Art blocks will happen, too.  Drawing can be frustrating but that’s ok.  Set a comfortable pace for yourself and rest when you can.  Whatever your pace is, you’re still an artist.  You got this.

Art is a valid path in life, as well.  Many will think art is a pointless thing to go into and that your future is doomed if you wish to create for a living.  That is NOT correct.

Also, explore different mediums!  If you’re not comfortable with one, you may be with another.  And who knows, you may find multiple ones you love!!

HIM

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m an Aromantic Asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

No, because nobody asks about my sexuality.  Unless it’s a topic we’re discussing, or if they simply ask, I wouldn’t bring it up.  Though I have spoke to a few who were curious, they still understood and accepted afterward and that’s good.  My friends are accepting as well.  More acceptance is a must.

MR_SMILES_ILLUS

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I haven’t met any who gave me trouble for being an aromantic asexual since I don’t get asked about my asexuality.  I still see misconceptions online, though, even If not directed at me personally.  A lot think that having sex is a must, and that is not true.  There’s nothing wrong for not wanting it, or not wanting a partner in general, whether sexual or romantic.  It’s also not good to think that asexual and aromantic are the same thing, or that asexuals don’t love at all.  I’m perfectly happy with no partner, but that doesn’t mean other aces aren’t interested in romantic relationships!  Resources and research are friends.

PIRATE

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If ANYONE says you’re weird, unnatural or broken, they’re wrong.  You are awesome.

Questioning your orientation and where you are on the spectrum is totally fine, and it’s ok if your orientation shifts over time.  You know you best.  And whoever dares to shame you for who you are, they are gross jerks.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Mainly here on tumblr!

http://victoriamrojas.tumblr.com/

RARITY

Thank you so much, Victoria, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Rylie

Today we’re joined by Rylie.  Rylie is a wonderfully talented aro-ace poet and fanfiction writer who is incredibly enthusiastic about writing.  As she states in her interview, she writes a lot.  Chances are we’ll be seeing a lot of her work in the future.  My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

butdepressionwasn27tlogical0adepressiondefiedlogic0aateveryturnyoucouldn27t0areasonyourwayoutof0adep-default

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write. A lot. Like, seriously a lot. Most of it is fanfiction, but I also do a lot of poetry, and I’ve dabbled in some slam poetry. That was actually how I came out to most of my friends.

(Sometimes I pretend I can draw or make other types of art, but the only people who are impressed are under the age of 8, so.)

What inspires you?

For poetry, usually reading other poetry. Listening to slam poems. For fanfiction, sometimes nothing, or sometimes the strangest things. Sometimes I write for prompts, but not all the time. Inspiration is a fickle thing for me.

quotescover-JPG-10

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a writer. I remember when I was young, sneaking into the bathroom at night because I hid a notepad and pen underneath the bathtub. That way I’d have an excuse if my parents caught me.

Being a writer was sort of always a job option, but medicine took precedence. Writing will always be a hobby though.

quotescover-JPG-35

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in our work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really? A lot of my work is pretty concise, and not overly detailed. Eloquent, I suppose.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Oh man. Keep going, I guess. Just keep going. Don’t ever delete anything or throw anything out. Sure, it may be awful, but you’ll look back on it one day and be happy that you kept it, because you can see how far you’ve come. Progress is important.

And some days you’ll feel like everything you come up with is shit. That’s okay too. Keep going. You’ll get through it.

quotescover-JPG-46

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual aromantic.

(Although to be honest, I don’t know how to tell friendships apart from romantic relationships, but that’s more a social skills deficit than anything else, I think.)

quotescover-JPG-63

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’m not out to most people (family), but my friends had a great response to my coming out slam poem. That was really great. (A girl actually came up to me and thanked me for it, because she thought that there was something wrong with her. That made me happy.)

When I’ve posted things for ace awareness week, people have asked me about it, and made some comments that made me uncomfortable.

There was also an incident in a LGBTQ group at school where someone made a comment about asexuality that was kind of hurtful, especially for it being a safe space.

Mostly it’s tough because no one knows it exists.

quotescover-JPG-65

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Its existence. A lot of people don’t know about asexuality, or demisexuality, or aromanticism at all. That makes it tough to come out when you constantly have to defend yourself and explain.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It’s okay if you don’t figure it out right away. Don’t let anyone tell you that your experiences aren’t valid, because they are. You’re the one who knows you the best.

quotescover-JPG-70

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Most of my fanfiction is on AO3. (http://archiveofourown.org/users/whitchry9/works)

Some of my poetry can be found on my tumblr (http://ijustreallylovedaredevil.tumblr.com/tagged/i-write-things), but I often don’t share it all. As for slam poems, I’ve only ever performed the one, so it’s hard to share them.

quotescover-JPG-85

Thank you so much, Rylie, for participating in this interview and this project.  It’s very much appreciated.