Interview: Bryn Kettle

Today we’re joined by Bryn Kettle. Bryn is a phenomenal animator from New Zealand. They draw a lot of fascinating and unique characters, frequently including bright vibrant colors to draw the viewer in. They’re clearly a dedicated and imaginative artist who loves what they do. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1. Putting the War in Reality Warpers
Putting the War in Reality Warpers

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m an animator who works on very cartoony nonsensical jazz that usually involves something meta or something that warps reality – most of my work is pretty much a tribute to something else.

What inspires you?

Cartoons – old, new, foreign, limited, in a weird medium, seconds long, hours long – whatever! if it’s animated, I’ll watch it!!

2. Atronus
Atronus

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I believe the first cartoon that got me into this mess was Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends – that, I remember, was about when I started to try and replicate smear frames that I’d get a glimpse at.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

The number ‘307.47’ pops up a lot. Everybody who I’ve worked with on shorts and what have you, that I’ve been able to sneak it in, have never questioned me about it – it’s probably because there’s a lot more cartoony nonsense distracting them from it.

It’s the DSM-IV code for nightmare disorder.

3. Butterfly Soldier
Butterfly Soldier

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

That isn’t keep making/practicing the thing? I think having a back log of your most favourite, most inspirational pieces of art to fall back on really helps keep me trucking along.

4

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Just a genuine ace!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not at all – I find my fellow artists are extremely accepting – the folks at work even use they/them pronouns for me.

That isn’t to say I haven’t experienced it anywhere else, of course – I’ve gotten my fair share of the old “you just haven’t found the right person” and “you’re young, you’ll grow out of it” every now and again.

5

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Oh criminy which one to pick – ace peeps had a bad experience, ace folks are all naive, the ace community are just picky – but I think the most common one I’ve gotten is the mindset that it’s curable in some shape or form.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

A month ago, I went to Wales to meet my second cousin Ian for the first time. he’s in his 60’s, retired and totally 100% ace goals – his apartment was full of treasures from his life, including a Salvador Dalí lithograph and he gets all the love he needs from his close friends and family. he’s never wanted, nor tried to get with folks and nobody really expects that of him. (they’ve given up at this point) So yes – it is absolutely possible to live a full and happy life without focusing on any of that jazz – just be you, focus on feeling before labels and live your best life full!!… of treasures, preferably.

6

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

At hoodboycartoons on InstaTwitterTumblr and Facebook and Hoodboy33 on Deviant art

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnCGOSQa4jg

7. Sean Expressions Chart
Sean Expressions Chart

Thank you, Bryn, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Inbar

Today we’re joined by Inbar. Inbar is a phenomenal visual artist and writer who has been running a webcomic for almost a year and a half. It’s entitled Just a Sidekick and it’s a superhero story that sounds fascinating. Aside from the webcomic, she’s also currently studying animation and is working on her final movie. When she’s not working on the webcomic or animation projects, Inbar also writes fanfiction. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and enthusiastic artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

5. My So-Called Face
My So-Called Face

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

The main project I am currently working on right now is a webcomic called “Just a Sidekick”, it’s a superhero ensemble story with a large focus on character interactions and character development. I’m also studying to be an animator, I’m in my last (fourth) year – and although I currently haven’t done any animation work that isn’t technically school work, I’m fairly proud in my animations. Currently, I just started work on my final movie, an urban fantasy called “Shoshi Ben-Abraham: Good Witch (Usually)” about a soft pastel witch and outgrowing the influence of toxic parents. In additions, I do some writing. The stories that I have online (and in English) are mostly fanfiction on AO3 (I’m currently writing for the Ace Attorney fandom), but I’ve also written original fiction before. Mostly short stories, but I’ve dabbled in poetry too.

What inspires you?

That’s the million-dollar question, isn’t it? Sometimes I feel like I’ve got stories overflowing in my brain all the time and I just need to grab the not-sucky ones and share those in the best medium possible. But I guess my biggest source of inspiration is… other works of art and storytelling media. Not in the sense that I consider myself a rip-off artist or that I steal ideas, but I just… I look at a work of fiction and find something about it I like; a particular character, a trope, a relationship, a plot point, a design aesthetic or even just a feel that the work inspires, and I go “That’s neat, I wonder what I could do with that. I wonder if I can give this idea a take of my own. A spin that takes the stuff that I like but makes it unique enough so it’s mine.” I used to go roaming on the TV Tropes website all the time, find a trope I think has cool potential and think what I could do with it. I’m a fan and analyst as much as I am a creator, and I think it reflects in my artistic process. Also, “Just a Sidekick” started out a middle-school piece of crossover fanfiction that mutated so much that I was better off just making it original fiction, so that’s something.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing and making up stories since I can remember myself. As a kid, I used to draw in any given opportunity, on anything I could find. On the final first grade, I had to stay after everyone had left to clean up the desk in my classroom as punishment for all the desks I doodled on. After that, my parents started buying me blank “drawing notebooks” to draw on instead. I filled them up, sometimes an entire notebook in one school day, with illustrations (and sometimes stories) I made up. I also always really liked animation, cartoon shows were my favorite form of entertainment as a child (I was always inherently biased against any kid’s show with live-action actors, they were always less interesting to me.) However, up until middle-school I didn’t consider animation, comics or art in general as a future career option. I thought of them as a hobby, my first dream (well, after I outgrew wanting to be a puppeteer-air hostess-cook-kindergarten teacher-robot scientist-farmer) was to be a zoologist. I love animals and I love reading facts about them, I thought I would enjoy becoming a scientist who studies them. But around middle school I started realizing it wasn’t a very realistic dream, I didn’t have a head for the sciencey subjects and I only really enjoyed knowing about animals from a distance and without all the icky stuff. Around that time, as I was reconsidering what I want to do with my life, I was watching some special feature about the history of Pixar in one of their DVDs (maybe the Incredibles?). Someone there said that they got into animation because they grew up watching Disney animated movies and so they wanted to do so themselves. That seemed like the right angle to go at, a lot of people answer ‘why did you decide to become an X’ with “well, I grew up inspired by X and I wanted to pay it forward to the next generation”. And what was my favorite form of media as a kid? The one I would like to advance forward to the kids of tomorrow? Cartoon shows! That’s when I decided that one I day I’ll be the creator of a cartoon show, or if that can’t happen – I’ll at leas be an animator. Also around the same time I was suddenly starting to have some problems with art class in school because it was starting to lean more ‘realistic’ and toward live-drawing – while I, I realized, care more about the art of telling stories via my drawing. The move to comics and animation is only logical from there.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My signature is the Hebrew Letter Ayin (the first letter of my name) stylized and with a dot in the middle to make it look like an eye (another meaning for the word “Ayin”). Although I don’t use it on a lot of online content. In terms of recurring storytelling motifs, I guess most of my stories have a mostly-female cast, and I really like the trope where a character has to face against a pre-character development representation of themselves.

4. My Signature
Signature

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Find something that you’re both pretty good at and have fun doing and focus on that. Also, originality is overrated. Having a unique idea nobody ever thought before is not nearly as important as presenting and delivering those ideas well.

2. Page 63
Page 63

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

The identity I feel most strongly about is “Asexual, period, full stop.” For the sake of communication, I can say that my identity is “Asexual Aromantic”, and it’s not that I’m ashamed at my lack of romantic attraction or that I don’t feel solidarity with other Aro people… but I’ve spent so much time questioning and second-guessing my own orientation and worrying that I might be ‘faking it’. But “Asexual” is the one label I’ve always come back to, the one that feels the most ‘right’, the most like home.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve encountered ace prejudice, but not in my ‘field’, so to speak. I’m not very vocal about my asexuality outside of the internet, and online (where I am very vocal) I’m just not that well-known as a creator. One time I made a piece of art as schoolwork about my AroAceness, and the teacher started out with “Oh that’s very sad that you felt like you have to fake attraction to a boy” but ended up constantly talking about her husbands and soulmates and how wonderful relationships were as if me talking about how I was hurt by heteronormativity is insulting her relationship somehow. That kinda hurt me, especially since it was such a personal piece. I am very afraid of the possibility I might be the target of ace prejudice, though. It’s an anxiety that’s constantly on my mind.

3. Shoshi model sheet
Shoshi model sheet

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s not ‘real’. When I first mentioned Asexuality to my dad, before I came out, he dismissed it as “what crazy thing they’ll make up next” and it really hurt me. I’ve seen all sorts of crazy antagonism and misunderstanding about Ace People online, but the outright dismissal of our identities is still what hurts me the most.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Surround yourself with good friends who respect your identity. Even if the world can be really crappy sometimes, a good community to take refuge in can make you feel a lot better. Also, try and not get stressed about your identity the way that I did, okay? You’re probably not faking it or lying to yourself, and if asexuality feels like the most ‘right’ label for you and makes you happy – that’s all you need.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My webcomic, Just a Sidekick, is found at http://justasidekickcomics.tumblr.com/ and http://justasidekick.thecomicseries.com/.

My fanfiction is on Archive of Our Own under “Invader Ham” https://archiveofourown.org/users/InvaderHam

I might upload some animated projects to my YouTube channel soon, which is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTL3B4o0qQzpyd_cvzHw-jg

1. Dana
Dana

Thank you, Inbar, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alice Chrosny

Today we’re joined by Alice Chrosny. Alice is a phenomenal visual artist who specializes in animation and character art. She enjoys drawing fantasy creatures and mythical monsters. Her work is extraordinary, showing an incredible eye for detail and color. It’s clear she’s a remarkably talented artist with a passion for creating, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

00_MiniWeatherFriends
Mini Weather Friends

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a 2D digital animator and character artist that loves drawing cute, friendly content from fluffy fantasy animals to mythical monsters.

What inspires you?

Animation! From television to movies, I was always amazed at how fun and alive drawn cartoons could be. They completely captured my heart at a young age and I knew I wanted to work with cartoons. For more inspiration, my friends and a bunch of webcomic artists I follow inspire me to keep going with my art and stay motivated.

1. Ace Pride Sunny
Ace Pride Sunny

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Watching Dexter’s Lab and PowerPuff Girls as a kid and all sorts of cartoons in general on Cartoon Network along with Disney movies, Looney Tunes, etc. Ever since I was old enough to hold a pencil, I’ve wanted to work in the art field in some way, primarily in animation.

2. MerMary
MerMary

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always write my signature with a dash and a tiny heart. I always try to put or sneak hearts in my illustrations when I can.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you’re passionate about art and want to continue creating, don’t give up.

Everyone learns and grows at a different pace and we’re all walking our own different path. Life’s not a race and I know it’s hard not to compare yourself to others, but you have to remember how far you’ve come. Draw what you want for yourself, challenge yourself, take care of yourself, and be kind to others and yourself.

You got this!

3. Alphonse Cats
Alphonse Cats

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as a Romantic Ace

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

When I’ve had to explain to people, they don’t always get it or just assume I’m just a “late bloomer” or know me better than I do. However, I’ve never personally faced any ace prejudice in my field, so I consider myself very fortunate.

4. Super Blue Moon Eclipse Hide
Super Blue Moon Eclipse Hide

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That aces don’t want to have relationships or be married. It’s pretty easy for asexuals to be confused or automatically assumed to be aromantic, too, but that’s not the case for everyone. Some aces want to have relationships and some don’t and that’s fine. Romantic love isn’t greater than platonic love. Love is important and comes in many different ways and forms that we give and receive.

5. Solar Dance 3
Solar Dance 3

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You’re not broken and you’re not alone. You can’t let others define and label who you are. You only know what makes you comfortable or not. If a label or identity feels right for you, then awesome, but don’t worry if you’re not sure. Everything’s on a spectrum, not everything fits neatly into place and that’s OK. You’re gonna be OK. Keep going!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find my work at my website: http://alicechrosny.com/

And follow me on social media!

https://twitter.com/alicechrosnyart
https://www.instagram.com/alicechrosnyart/
http://alicechrosnyart.tumblr.com/
https://www.youtube.com/user/AliceApproved/featured

Thank you so much and I hope you have a Sunny Day!

6. Solar Dance 4
Solar Dance 4

Thank you, Alice, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jocelyn “Joccy” Saravia

Today we’re joined by Jocelyn “Joccy” Saravia. Jocelyn is a phenomenally talented visual artist. They do a lot of fanart, using mostly digital mediums to create their art. When they’re not drawing fanart, Jocelyn does a lot of art for school and hopes one day to be a professional animator. It’s very clear they’re an artist with an incredibly bright future, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

FullSizeRender 2

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I usually do the art that is for the fandom such as Ouran High School Host Club, and I also do the art that’s required for school and lastly, the digital art. Also, I am an artist for furry fandom, not the dark side. I just usually draw the cute stuff.

I love to take art classes at any chances I get. You could say that I am kinda like a doujinshi artist and a student artist aiming to be in professional animator field

What inspires you?

My inspiration is around me. It could be my friends, my parents, my disability, or any theme that I am very passionate in. When I usually draw, I feel the sense of the passion to inform people what I felt or thought about in that time.

FullSizeRender

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have to tell the story about that. Haha, when I was in second grade, I had the some unusual dream. It showed the infamous Mona Lisa art in dark black room, and I was standing there in my pajamas. I felt some urge to create the art that could be great as her artist did. But I never finished it in my dream. When I woke up, I knew I wanted to be an artist. I always have been an artist for years. I am still chasing that dream to complete my art until my death.

IMG_0575

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Well, I don’t usually have the special or unique signature or etc, but I usually hide the subtle theme that people with mental illness or disability could relate and feel that they are connected to me and I want to really connect with them.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Remember, the old phrase worked for me: practice makes the work perfect (not literally, but you know what I am saying!) :D<

IMG_0913

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Greyromantic Asexual , that’s where I identify!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Yeah, it’s hard. Some people tend to tell me that I am missing out the greatest opportunity that I could create work out of it or something. But that was the thing I ignore continuously.

IMG_3493

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception about asexuality is that people feel that I don’t want a relationship, while I am actively look for one.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Hey, one thing I thought that I was broken or just had mental illness associated with that, that we are not broken or just have something that influence, that’s okay. That’s something we can try to cope or live in the style.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

https://moose-chan.weebly.com/  (For now student/personal portfolio)
https://www.instagram.com/moose__chan/  (Social Media Platform)

IMG_3503

Thank you, Jocelyn, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Sami Mariano Vacari

Today we’re joined by Sâmi Mariano Vacari. Sâmi is a phenomenal visual artist who does illustration and animation. They’re currently studying animation at uni. They do some Overwatch fancomics and have an original webcomic entitled Dead Hearts, which is currently on a temporary hiatus while they finish up at uni. Sâmi’s work shows an incredible attention to detail and color, as you’ll soon see. It’s clear they have an incredibly bright future ahead of them. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

3

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I love designing characters and digital cut-out animation, but I also do illustrations and comics! I create mostly Overwatch fancomics for my art blog, at least they are the most popular thing I do and I try to keep them frequent. I’m an animation undergraduate in my last year of uni, I’ll be working on my conclusion short film for a year, and I hope I can create something very good to add to my portfolio!

I also have a webcomic project that’s currently on hiatus so I can focus on uni, it’s called Dead Hearts. The main character is an aroace trans woman, and it’s something that doesn’t follow her all the story but it has a big impact on how her life plays. It’s a project I’m hoping to go back to as soon as I can!

What inspires you?

What keeps me going forward is mostly the fact that I see so little of myself in animated TV shows. I’ve seen a growth in them the last years, but I see a lot of ace and non-binary characters alike being portrayed as robots or aliens. Very hard to find them as just common human beings who happen not to have sexual attraction. I try to create stories I would like to see myself.

All ponies
All Ponies

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I grew up with anime, specially magical girl animes. I’ve always loved Sailor Moon, it’s still my number one show! My first serious piece of illustration was a Sailor Jupiter fanart when I was in fifth grade, and I’ve never stopped creating since then. When I discovered I could go to university and get a degree in animation, I didn’t think twice!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I guess my work has a very cutesy feel to it, my color palettes all have pink in it somewhere. I’m fascinated by that fantasy sunset color palette with a pink-purple-blue gradient so they are pretty recurring in my work.

anamaria
Anamaria

 

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I guess, most of all, you need to be having fun with what you’re doing. I see many friends starting out and worrying too much about technique, and I see that hindering them from finding a style they can call theirs. You gotta have a base too but you can’t forget the creativity when creating.

Also, animation has a very interesting concept that is, why is your film important? We are asked this question when presenting ideas to producers and studios. Creating content for others isn’t only you fulfilling your artistic need to share your ideas, but it also has a big social impact when it is experienced by other people, an impact we sometimes undermine. I carry this very close to me when creating my work. What will others experience when they see you work? It can change your perspective.

beforecontact story
“Before Contact” story

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m pan-demisexual/romantic, I have always been, it’s just easier to put it in words now.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

My animation classmates have been the best. I didn’t disclose me being ace to all of them, but the ones I did, were very understanding. But I also understand they are all pretty much outliers, and many others I know wouldn’t be too welcoming to it.

concept aliens
Concept Aliens

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I see the whole “humans can’t be asexual, they reproduce, they’re not plants” a very lot and it’s very annoying by the sheer plainness of argument. Also the whole “asexuality is just a phase” be it someone thinking that you’re just a late bloomer or anything else.

deadheartsavatar
Dead Hearts avatar

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Take pride in what you are. It’s you and if you’re ace, it’s great! It’s not just some phase and it’s something very real for many people all around the world.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My art Tumblr is faeri-sami, and I also post frequently on my Instagram stories faerisami. Some of my comics are on tapastic too.

header

Thank you, Sâmi, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Shay

Today we’re joined by Shay. Shay is a wonderful visual artist who specializes in a cartoon style. She is a self-taught artist and is currently working to get a degree in animation. Her work has a masterful use of color and a sense of whimsy, which just makes you want to smile. She’s clearly a dedicated and talented artist, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

me windbreaker teal
Me Windbreaker Teal

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a self-taught digital illustrator and I’m pursuing a degree in 2D animation! I prefer to use a very Western cartoon-like style. Picking out bright or pastel color schemes is my favorite!

What inspires you?

I often draw my favorite YouTubers, my friends, and my two adorable dogs! I also do a lot of self-portraits. Lately I’ve been trying to create my own original characters, but those are all still a work in progress. When I’m not sure what to draw, I sometimes will come up with a color palette that I love and go from there!

amy sick
Amy Sick

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been interested in drawing, but I didn’t set my mind on really trying to improve until about 6 years ago. Growing up I would only consider more “practical” careers like graphic design or marketing. That is, until a year ago when it suddenly occurred to me that real people with real lives actually get to illustrate and animate for a living. And it made me think “Why couldn’t that be me?”

chica colored
Chica

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not typically, but when drawing myself I often include daisies somewhere in the illustration just because I really love them, and four-leaf clovers because I have a knack for finding them and they just seem to appear everywhere in my life. And it couldn’t hurt to have a little luck on my side!

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to try out elements of a style from artists you look up to. As long as you’re not tracing or essentially/literally claiming their work as your own, it will certainly help you discover your own unique style. Everyone’s signature style is just a conglomerate of things they saw and just thought to themselves “Wow! I really like that! I wonder if I could replicate that!” Trying out styles like that really helps you come into your own with time.

ethan peace
Ethan Peace

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I am asexual and heteromantic!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really, mostly just those that have never had the concept of asexuality explained to them. People tend to associate sex with something artistic, and therefore assume that all artists want that in their lives, which is not the case at all!

jack and mark dudebros fixed
Jack and Mark Dudebros

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s just being picky or that an ace person just “hasn’t found the right person yet.” If you’re asexual you don’t have any interest at all. I have never once in my life looked at someone and fantasized about having sex with them, and I’m in college. That has nothing to do with not finding the right person.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Please don’t stress about it too much! You may face some prejudice and ignorance about asexuality in your life, but at the end of the day you know how you feel, and nobody else can change that about you no matter how much they want to. You are not broken!

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m most active on my Tumblr blog, but you can find me on these social medias:
DeviantART: https://sorrelheart.deviantart.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/sorrelheart_jpg
Redbubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/shaytastic

baylee happy
Baylee Happy

Thank you, Shay, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Signal Boost: Weird Middle School Smells

Hi everyone!

Foster Eber was recently interviewed by this site (Tumblr & WordPress) and he has just completed work on his first animated short.

He has written a post on his personal Tumblr about it, found here.

So please, check out the video on YouTube and show Foster some love. It’s great and he put a lot of work into it, which shows.