Interview: Zoe

Today we’re joined by Zoe. Zoe is a wonderful young up and coming author who writes YA and middle grade fiction. She has drafted three novels, all are in the genres of supernatural and magical realism. They feature a diverse cast of characters, most of them are LGBTQIA+, the kind of characters Zoe has often wanted to see in the books she was reading. It’s clear she’s a very passionate and dedicated writer with an incredibly bright future ahead of her, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write young adult/middle grade books that could also count as magical realism or supernatural. My current project centres on different supernatural/paranormal beings such as angels, demons, vampires, sirens etc. It is pretty diverse compared to a lot of books I’ve read recently, and includes a gender fluid vampire, a pansexual warlock, an aroace demon in a queer-platonic relationship, a bisexual demon, a biromantic angel, a lesbian werewolf, an aroace fae who is sex and romance repulsed (There are others, as well as heterosexual characters.) It also includes all the struggles they have to deal with because of their sexualities and genders, as well as their supernatural race. (While also trying to stop a very evil woman from taking her revenge out on the whole world)

I thought it should be a bit more diverse than the other young adult/middle grade books I have read because to me, having two or three LGBTQIA+ characters in an entire 16 book world seems very unrealistic. At school, I had at least three or four LGBTQIA+ kids in each class I went to for every lesson.

What inspires you?

Usually, books I’ve read. I didn’t really know what to write about to be honest, before I started. But then I read a few young adult books of the same type I wanted to write and something clicked. With every book I read, I had a new idea for something that could happen. Of course, I didn’t steal from the books. What I mean, is that I could picture how old spell books looked, and realised a King would probably care more about having a son for an heir than a daughter. This helped me picture a possible scene for an argument between a father and daughter, in which this point could have been brought up.

Also, music inspires me a lot. I always listen to music. Classical pieces, soundtracks from movies, actual songs even musicals. Whatever it takes to give me some inspiration, I even sleep while listening to music to help me better picture what might be giving me trouble when writing. Think of it like writing fanfiction in my head, of my own stories, while I try to sleep.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have always loved reading, and throughout primary school (ages 3-11) we had a lot of opportunities to write our own short stories in class. I loved it, and thought it was fun. I didn’t know I wanted to be a writer until a few years ago when I discovered NaNoWriMo (I won) and realised how fun writing could be and got back into it.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I haven’t done the math, but there’s roughly the same amount of LGBTQIA+ characters as there are heterosexual characters (not counting small children). In any book I will ever write, I will always try to keep it as close to 50/50 as I can, because that is the most realistic figure. There’s also hardly ever any angst revolving around romance, or any explicit stuff because I strongly dislike it and have no time for that nonsense of “he loves me, he loves me not.”

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t stop writing. If someone says you write too much, or you should spend more time doing something that benefits them, don’t listen and keep writing. I was told that I spend too much time reading and writing, the only two things I do for fun, by my family who wanted me to essentially become a third parent to my brother who is only 2 years younger than me. It upset me, and I stopped both. I didn’t read anything for ages, and eventually forgot about my writing for a few months. It’s good to take a break, but on your terms, or as close as you can get.

I still struggle trying to get into writing again, because I feel like it will be hard. Because I don’t remember what I was going to do with this sentence, or because I can’t remember what that character looked like or if they are even in this book. Don’t let anyone – and I mean anyone – tell you that it isn’t worth it. Write for you.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as a sex and romance repulsed aroace, and I experience aesthetic attraction. I also identify as pan because my aesthetic attraction can be to anyone of any gender.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t experienced any. However, when I was talking to my best friend and fellow Asexual about some of the characters, trying to work out a scene, I mentioned they were both Aroace. I also have an ace-biromantic character not in that scene. She asked “That makes three on the Ace Spectrum, right? Isn’t that a bit much?” No. it is not “a bit much” because I know several asexual people online, and together we make two. In real life, in a world with billions of people, at least 1% of which (7 million I think total) asexuals, it makes sense to have a few who know each other. She knew this, it was just more of shock at seeing more than one Ace character in a single book, and she wasn’t being mean or anything.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I have several, and they are all from my best friend’s ex-boyfriend, although I have heard other people say stuff along these lines too.

  • (asexual refusing to have sex with her boyfriend because she’s a sex repulsed asexual) “But biologically speaking everyone needs sex.” – This isn’t true. I’ve heard it can be fun, great, stress-relieving, and a bunch of other positive things from people who continuously talk to me about it even when I tell them not to. But biologically, you don’t crave it. You don’t die without it. Biologically speaking, it is how babies are made. Nothing more.
  • “You’re not asexual because you don’t need to photosynthesize” – hahaha, no. he said this sincerely, and he meant this to hurt. It isn’t a joke. There are multiple meanings for different words in the English language. “My nose is running” does not mean you’re nose is in fact running down your face and about to make an escape to go join the party next door.
  • “Asexuality isn’t a thing. It’s just an excuse. You’re a lesbian” – yeah she’s an Aroace lesbian, but she didn’t know it at the time. She’s still aroace. It doesn’t matter what else you identify as, if you think you are on the spectrum, no one can invalidate you like this. Asexuality is a thing. It is also annoying to hear this several times in the same conversation.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Asexuality, and the whole spectrum, is a thing. Aromanticism is a thing. Aroace is a thing. You can be both, you can be one or the other. You can be in a qpr, you can be single forever. You can have a partner, or not. You can be a third sexuality on top of this. You can hate sex/romance with a fiery passion or you can still enjoy it. Don’t let uninformed people try to tell you how you feel, because the person who knows you best is you. And if this means having your aroace-pan awakening at 2am and grinning like a fool for three days then so be it. Because you deserve to be happy. If someone you love says the words “but biologically-“or “you aren’t ace/aro” or any variation of “it’s a fad/you just want attention.” Even after you’ve explained it to them? Even after you’ve given them a chance to learn about your orientation? Get rid of them because you can do better. Any loved one who forces you to ignore how you feel, or invalidates you, or pressures you into things you don’t want to do, is not worth your time.

When you come out to people, be ready for the inevitable vocab lesson, but don’t be upset about it and if they ask a lot of questions, try not to be offended. In all likelihood, they have no idea what any of this means because when they were growing up it wasn’t as widely known. Take a few minutes to explain. They might get it, they might not. They might be supportive, they might not. But at least they know. And if they get confused somehow and think you just came out as a lesbian, please, for the sake of your sanity, correct them. Do not let them think you and your best friend are lesbian lovers unless you, for some reason, want them to think that. It is about what you are comfortable with.

Tell the person you are dating what your boundaries are, or what you are uncomfortable with. For example, I personally despise all physical contact with all but 2 people. Maybe they can work their way in, but for now, tell them. Don’t let yourself be uncomfortable just so you don’t have to have the awkward conversation where you tell them you don’t want to be kissed or you don’t want to have sex. And if they don’t respect your boundaries, get rid of them. A person who is willing to just be platonic cuddle buddies with no pressure on either side is much better than a person who refuses to understand your orientation and the things you don’t want to do.

Also, don’t listen to aphobes, at all.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I haven’t published anything anywhere, but I’m always up for questions about my work in progress, or anything to do with writing (or my orientation really). My Tumblr is at solangelo3088.

Thank you, Zoe, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Miranda Mundt

Today we’re joined by Miranda Mundt. Miranda is a phenomenal visual artist who specializes in fantasy. She enjoys drawing mostly humanoid creatures and really loves experimenting with bright colors. Looking through the images she sent and her Tumblr, there is a remarkable beauty and bright liveliness to her art. Miranda captures an amazing amount of expression and emotion in her work, as you’ll see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

sketchysketch

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

With my art I draw primarily fantasy art — focusing primarily on humanoid creatures (elves, angels, mermaids etc.). I enjoy drawing different expressions and pretty flowy things. I suppose the thing that I do most is try to do different fun/bright colors and color schemes. Still learning about that bit though, hah.

thuja016

What inspires you?

I have been inspired greatly by Disney as well as so many artists that I’ve seen on tumblr. Many artists who are also animators that have really beautiful expressions/poses. I am inspired to try and make my art capture a moment. Where you can see the movement. I also really adore seeing people’s unique characters or their creative take on already existing works.

tumblr_nbkuxgBaxE1qbsoeco2_400

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember but only really started to think about it seriously in 6th-7th grade. Where I started developing original characters and trying to draw comics. Over time I switched from wanting to do comics to wanting to be an animator. So I attended VFS for classical animation and had the time of my life. Turns out that life had other plans for me however, I became a freelance illustrator and worked mostly in fan art posters and children’s books. I do adore it though, both experiences have allowed me to improve my work tremendously.

tumblr_nfuzcclugL1qbsoeco1_1280

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I guess my signature would be sort of the sketchy/quick line art, bright colors and usually some sort of splattery effect lol! I have a weakness for splattery effects.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I would say my advice would be to not pin yourself to one particular thing. I mean obviously have goals- but be open to finding new things that you love as you learn. For example- how I ended up doing kids books instead of animating. I didn’t fail in my goal to get an animation job- I just found a different thing that I was better at and more confident in. Also- on that note. Keep trying. Keep pushing. It takes a long time to build up the work needed to be ‘successful’ in freelance. And you’ll probably have to do some things that aren’t very fun, but you’ll get through it!

tumblr_o8sbtmnQkF1vudub5o1_540

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as Asexual Aromantic! (ace aro) for a while I just identified as asexual and was demiromantic. Before I realized it wasn’t that I was romantically open to everyone it was that I was romantically available to no one. I’ve felt way better about myself now that I don’t have to stress about that part of my identity.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

In my field it hasn’t really come up. Because I work from home over a computer so it never really comes up. I have mentioned it a couple of times to a couple of coworkers. One of them was understanding and seemed to get it right away, the other one I think… just sort of brushed over it. I think the most frustrating part is realizing that they all just assume that I’m straight.

tumblr_o335djpyqm1qbsoeco3_400

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I will get over it. Or that it is a choice. When I explained it to my mother she seemed to understand before mentioning in a later conversation that I was “still young” and that things would change.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

My biggest bit of advice is to say… There is nothing that is permanent. While I don’t see myself being anything other than Aro-Ace for the rest of my life… The idea that once you subscribe to a label that it’s all that you can be forever is harmful. If you find peace in calling yourself Asexual, if even just for a while, then that is most important. There is a strong windfall of relief in calling yourself something you identify with.

Do not force yourself into ANY situations that are uncomfortable for you (I.E relationships/sex/etc) just for the sake of “proving” that you are Ace. If you believe you are, then you are. That’s that.

tumblr_o4096hDEhD1qbsoeco1_400

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

http://miranda-mundt-art.tumblr.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Mirandamillustrations/
http://mirandamundt.blogspot.com/  (older stuff, I don’t update it as much anymore)

tumblr_o66ijw5Oeb1v89pjfo1_540

Thank you, Miranda, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.