Interview: Amethyst

Today we’re joined by Amethyst. Amethyst is an amazing musician who has been playing the double bass for five years. Aside from playing, they’re also interested in music composition. Amethyst is absolutely brimming with enthusiasm and passion for music, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I have been playing the double bass for five years now! I play with my school orchestra, and also practice solo repertoire on my own for competitions. Playing bass inspired me to dabble in composition, so I have composed two pieces for orchestra. This year I just started playing the piano, which I am super excited about.

What inspires you?

My inspiration for bass is other bassists who are just so talented that I want to be able to play like them.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

My older sister played bass before me, and when I heard her practicing I knew that I wanted to play bass. I haven’t always wanted to be an artist, for a while I wanted to be a dancer, but for most of my life I wanted to be an interior designer. I only realized that I want to be an artist for sure last year.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

People tell me that my passion for bass is clear, so I guess just really showing my enjoyment of the instrument while playing.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing! It is hard to put in the effort some days, but it pays off!

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’m not out to anyone outside of my core friend group, so I haven’t encountered any prejudice.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Asexuality = not liking sex, not wanting sex, but all asexuality means is not feeling sexual attraction.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Find good, positive resources who can encourage you and answer any questions you might have! For me, it was really helpful to have a supportive friend group who didn’t judge and truly accept my asexuality.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

There isn’t anywhere currently for people to find out more.

Thank you, Amethyst, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

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